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L. W.

Boston, MA
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  • 19
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  • Killers of the Flower Moon

  • The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
  • By: David Grann
  • Narrated by: Will Patton, Ann Marie Lee, Danny Campbell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,216
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,621
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,600

In the 1920s the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An outstanding story, highly recommended

  • By S. Blakely on 06-22-17

Tragic and All-Too-Believable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

I'd love to say that I found this story to be be incredible, but unfortunately it's all-too-easy to believe that White Americans devalued and disregarded the lives of people of color. The only thing that is mildly surprising is how thoroughly-planned the terrible actions were, and how pervasive the conspirators. My stomach turned and my heart ached while reading this.

I would say that everyone should read this, but it should especially be read by White Americans with deep roots in the West and Southwest.

Wonderfully written and researched by Mr. Grann. All three narrators were wonderful, and I appreciate what each brought to his or her respective section.

5 stars.

  • The Last Black Unicorn

  • By: Tiffany Haddish
  • Narrated by: Tiffany Haddish
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,257
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,659
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,566

Tiffany can't avoid being funny: it's just who she is. But The Last Black Unicorn is so much more than a side-splittingly hilarious collection of essays - it's a memoir of the struggles of one woman who came from nothing and nowhere. A woman who was able to achieve her dreams by reveling in her pain and awkwardness, showing the world who she really is, and inspiring others through the power of laughter.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sad it ended

  • By HerHighness on 12-08-17

Roses out of the Poop

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-18

Not brilliantly written, but a sincere, funny, and wonderfully narrated tale of overcoming incredible obstacles. She's a true talent.

  • Anatomy of a Miracle

  • A Novel
  • By: Jonathan Miles
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
  • Length: 13 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 87

Rendered paraplegic after a traumatic event four years ago, Cameron Harris has been living his new existence alongside his sister, Tanya, in their battered Biloxi, Mississippi, neighborhood where only half the houses made it through Katrina. One stiflingly hot August afternoon, as Cameron sits waiting for Tanya during their daily run to the Biz-E-Bee convenience store, he suddenly and inexplicably rises up and out of his wheelchair.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Astoundingly good

  • By Anonymous User on 08-08-18

We See What We Want to See

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-18

Really fantastic.

Told as if a narrative nonfiction account, this novel explores issues of faith--in religion, in science, in love, in other people--from the perspective of a narrator who is decidedly not omniscient.

What would you do if you witnessed something that appeared to be a miracle? Would you accept it as that? Or dismiss it as a scientific anomaly for which no explanation has yet been proposed? Or would you try to profit it and make the entire situation about yourself? All these questions and more are explored with humor, compassion and an eye that somehow combines cynicism and idealism. I quite literally laughed and cried at various intervals throughout this novel.

How wonderful.

  • Hunger

  • A Memoir of (My) Body
  • By: Roxane Gay
  • Narrated by: Roxane Gay
  • Length: 5 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,088
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,827
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,812

In her phenomenally popular essays and long-running Tumblr blog, Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and body, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as "wildly undisciplined", Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brutal and raw and honest

  • By S. Yates on 07-17-17

A Stunning Book on Unruly Bodies

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-18

"I know that I am breaking the unspoken rules of what a woman should look like.

"I am hyper conscious of how I take up space. As a woman, as a fat woman, I am not supposed to take up space. And yet, as a feminist, I am encouraged to believe that I can take up space."

Brilliant and moving. I had originally thought to myself “every day person should read this” but as I got further and further into the book, I thought “every person should read this.”

While the book focuses on Roxane’s personal story, her intelligence and insight allows her to speak on how the world treats everyone with an “unruly” body. How fat people are dehumanized, treated as objects of pity at best and disgust at worst. How it is especially bad for women, who patriarchy would have been small objects designed to look pretty for the pleasure of men. How the medical field treats fat people as cautionary tales and seems to take delight in thinking of them as the “walking dead.”

An absolutely stunning and powerful book.

5 very enthusiastic stars.