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Christine Newton

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  • Skeletons in the Attic: More Tales from a Mortician

  • By: Michael Gore
  • Narrated by: J. Stempien
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10

With 15 dark and twisted tales, the mortician is back to terrify you once again. The author of the hit horror anthology Tales from a Mortician has masterfully woven a new collection that will turn your stomach and have you checking under your bed, locking your doors, and leaving the lights on as you listen. From finding a body in your parents' attic to serial killers, cannibals, werewolves, gut-wrenching Halloween tricks, and even a sweet old lady who kills dozens, Skeletons is sure to terrify, disgust, and enthrall everyone who dares to listen to it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Really Twisted Short Stories

  • By Spooky Mike on 11-13-18

Mix of horror stories, some harcore

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

Some of the stories in this audiobook lean towards the lighter, fun side of horror, while others definitely tread into deeper waters with splatterpunk and 'boobs and blood'. Like some other reviewers here have noted, I'm not entertained by stories featuring sexual violence towards women. (Indeed, while reading/listening to them, I'm often distracted thinking about what kind of minds write and read them with such relish and enthusiasm.).

Sexual ultra-violence aside, I enjoyed many of the other story ideas in this collection. For example, 'Paralyzed'had a flavour of the 'Saw' movies. 'Skeletons in the Attic' finished with an ironic twist that made the entire tale darkly humorous. 'Time is Everything' showed us how the possibility of immortality can bring out the worst in some people. 'Ripe' was a twisted story of soulmates. 'Four Halloweens' followed a victim's quest for vengeance. I liked the ideas in all of the aforementioned stories, although I think some of them would have been more satisfying if the endings had been written a wee bit differently.

The narration was enthusiastic and I can understand why other reviewers gave positive ratings for performance. My subjective, personal preference is for male narrators to use less exaggeration for character voices (especially female character voices), and for a deeper sounding voice that resonates more. This narrator sounds very young, which seems to suit some of the stories in this collection better than others.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Hero Hunter: A Superhero Gamelit Saga

  • The Heroes Rising Series, Book 1
  • By: Darren Hultberg Jr
  • Narrated by: J. Scott Bennett
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 34

Terrax Prime is one of the safest places in the galaxy, a world-spanning metropolis built on the foundations of order, justice, and law. Terrax also happens to be a birthplace of heroes; humans born with powerful, world-altering super-powers. In service to the prime government, these heroes work to keep the streets of Terrax safe, acting as the world's super-hero police force, or so it seems. Terrible secrets lie deep within the core of Terrax Prime’s hero program, and one man will do whatever he can to bring those secrets to the surface..

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I just wish it were longer!

  • By TU on 11-27-18

3.5*- More Superhero fiction than GameLit

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

I've read both superhero fiction and LitRPG in the past few years - although not too deeply into either genre, so take my review with a grain of salt. My two cents are that this audiobook is predominantly superhero fiction and is light on elements of GameLit. If you take away the occasional descriptions of power/speed/agility/etc stats, this story walks and talks just like the pure superhero fiction stories I've read during the past few years. Yes, our (anti-)hero has an AI-assisted inventory of weapons at his disposal, but this seems to be unique to him and not the other superheroes in the story; it's part of his superhero powers/identity. Yes, he's on a quest, but it's not a game-related quest - it's a revenge mission to redress an incident that happened in his past.

Personally, I'm completely comfortable with that, since my preference skews towards superhero fiction rather than LitRPG. But if your preference skews the other way, I'm not certain that your thirst for GameLit will be quenched in this first book of the series.

It's hard to penalize the author for things like lack of character development, since this may come gradually in future installments. We know what motivates his main actions but we don't really get a sense of the main character's (Aidan's) personality. Based on many of his behaviours, he seems to be generally immature and selfish - he doesn't have much depth to his character. I also got restless at times, with secondary characters popping in and out of the story without a smooth transition (e.g., Candace seems to be an integral part of the story for the first part of the book, but then she completely disappears and doesn't even seem to pop into Aidan's mind at all for the rest of the story). Finally, Aidan's revenge quest has been underway for a few years and he has a dauntingly powerful main target in sight, but I definitely had the impression that he hadn't done any pre-planning about how to put down an essentially invincible foe. For a guy who has been stewing in the tarpit of vengeful thoughts for years, it doesn't seem that he did any actual plotting.

It sounds like a lot of negativity here, but the author gives us a sharp little twist at the end of the story - a mini-cliffhanger, I suppose - with an enticing hook that will likely compel readers to check out the next story in the series. I can certainly see why this story receives positive reviews. It's darkly entertaining and I think the author has set the stage for interesting times ahead with future installments.

I've listened to other audiobooks with this narrator. He's a good narrator and I like the way he uses his voice. I increased the playback speed somewhat, to find a narration pace that suited my personal preferences. The only reason why I deducted a star for narration is because I think he's a great narrator but I don't think this was the right project for his particular voice. He doesn't have a young, brash (anti)super-hero voice; the tone and timbre of his voice doesn't align with my mental image of Aidan. I've listened to audiobooks with this narrator in other genres (e.g., dystopian fiction with a wild-west flavour) and the fit seemed to be more authentic and seamless in those other stories.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Deep Six

  • Just Cause Universe, Book 4
  • By: Ian Thomas Healy
  • Narrated by: Leslie Howard
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

When criminals are convicted, they go to jail. When they have parahuman abilities, they go to Deep Six, the most secure prison facility in the world. Six thousand feet underground, nobody has ever escaped from the maximum security facility. Until now. A parahuman terrorist called Misrule engineers a mass breakout, and it falls to a pair of prison guards to stop the world's most dangerous criminals from reaching freedom.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better then I expected.

  • By cosmitron on 10-11-18

entertaining standalone superhero story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-18

I'm usually hesitant to jump into a story part-way through a series, feeling that I might be bewildered by characters that I should already be familiar with. However, as a newbie to the series, I was easily able to follow the story and didn't feel like I was at a disadvantage. As for the story itself, it was entertaining and held my attention throughout. We're given a soft cliffhanger at the end, but the main story wound down sufficiently so that I didn't feel like I was left dangling by the author. I also liked the budding romance between the two main characters and was glad to see the connection develop gradually rather than having the two main characters fall in love/bed instantly. I liked the good guys and wanted to see them prevail over the bad guys (which is a good thing -- sometimes when hero characters aren't well-developed, I feel no connection to the good guys and cross my fingers that they meet their doom!).

Some of the other reviewers had mixed feelings about the narrator's whispery, feminine voice. I found that if I increased the playback speed to 1.25, the pitch and pacing flowed best (for me, anyway). Some of the narrator's character voices made me wince a bit (e.g., the voice for T-Rex), which is why I knocked a star off of the narration rating.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Year's Best Hardcore Horror, Volume 3

  • By: Scott Smith, Nathan Ballingrud, Brian Hodge, and others
  • Narrated by: Angel Leigh McCoy
  • Length: 15 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32

It was a killer year for horror fiction of the harder kind. Authors, editors, and publishers presented readers with some startling works of horrific imagination, stories graphic in the extreme yet with subtleties suggesting larger meanings, tales that explore humanity by plumbing depths of soulless inhumanity and, in some cases, outright depravity. The stories here represent the best of them, disturbing tales that dig deep and take you into the dark heart of horror itself, unrelenting and unapologetic.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • GREAT ASSORTMENT!

  • By G C on 09-25-18

More hits than misses in this collection

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-18

I know that when I read/listen to short story compilations, I won't enjoy every single story. I call it a win if I can pick out a half dozen that resonate. In this audiobook, I'm happy to have found several stories here that I really enjoyed: "Burnt", "Til Death", "Bernadette", "Reprising Her Role", "Treehuggers", "West of Matamoros, North of Hell", "Ultra", and "The Dogs" were the ones that stood out for me personally. Everyone has different preferences and thresholds when it comes to hardcore horror, and I"m not sure that I'd classify all of my favourites here as hardcore. Of my handful of favourites, I'd consider "Burnt" and "West of Matamoros, North of Hell" to definitely align with my internal definition of hardcore horror, and maybe also "The Dogs".

When I see a book titled "Volume 3", my subconscious grades the content as somehow inferior to the stories that would make the cut in "Volume 1" or "Volume 2". That's why I suppose I was pleasantly surprised to find that some of these stories were so compelling (in a hardcore horror sort of way).

I really enjoyed the narrator - I'm a fan of alto female voices for narrators and I liked her dispassionate tone as she was narrating. It seemed to fit well with this genre of audiobook because it shifted the focus to the stories and let the words speak for themselves. A hyper-emotional narration would have been overkill, I think. It occurred to me as I was listening to the audiobook that the narrator does good accented voices, too. I'm not sure how authentic they are to the specific regions where the stories took place, but I found them to be quite compelling. I didn't give five stars for narration because I felt that the pace was a bit too slow; once I increased the playback speed to 1.25x, I hit a sustainable comfort zone with the narration.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Pandora’s Card Game

  • By: E E King
  • Narrated by: Genevieve Sibayan
  • Length: 6 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

 

Fate, Destiny, Chance and Luck play cards beneath a new October moon. A wind destroys their game and the cards begin to move. Each card tells a tale.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting idea, stories themselves are less so

  • By Margaret on 11-05-18

Some stories were quite interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-18

The other reviews here have been overwhelmingly positive, so I guess my tastes and preferences are different than most.

My thoughts: Most of the stories didn't resonate with me at all. In a short story compilation, there are bound to be some stories that hold one's attention and others that don't. Ideally, you want the majority to be in the first category but I found (in my opinion) that most of the stories didn't pique my interest at all. A handful of stories in the middle were really, really good, though. They included: "Evolution", "The Dream Rental", "Footprint in Time," and "The Hearing Aids".

So, why didn't I enjoy the other stories in this compilation? I liked the author's wordcrafting - I admire the ability to write lyrically, which is a talent that I absolutely do not possess. I think it was the plots of the stories themselves that were less compelling. Also, the author 'linked' the stories together in the context of round-robin storytelling by four immortal sisters. I liked the idea of using this as a means of connecting the stories, that's intriguing! However, the themes of the stories themselves weren't linked. One sister would tell a story and the sisters would chat about it, usually in a 'this is the moral of the story' fashion, an 'I don't understand what that story was about' fashion, or a 'it's too bad that story had a sad ending but such is life' fashion. Then it would be the next sister's turn to tell a new story and an overarching arc or thematic progression wasn't apparent to me. Throughout the audbiobook, there was a foreshadowing of the coming of the sister's dreaded brother (Despair), but when he appeared at the end of the book, the scene turned out to be less suspenseful than I thought it would be.

Again, most other reviewers gave the narration 4 or 5 stars, but my personal tastes and preferences are different. The narrator has a whimsical, fluid style of speaking and I enjoyed the emotionality of her voice. However, I found the pacing very slow. I couldn't listen to it at regular speed, but increasing the playback speed to 2x worked better for me. Also, my preference is for alto voices in female narration and this narrator's voice was usually more high-pitched and childlike. So, generally not to my taste but I could see how other listeners might find the narration more appealing.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • The Distance

  • By: Jeremy Robinson, Hilaree Robinson
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer, Heather Costa
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 437
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 409
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 409

The human race has turned to dust. August Morrison faces it after rising from the depths of a dark matter research facility in Arizona. His co-workers. His daughter. All of them: dust. Friends and colleagues around the world don’t answer their phones. The city of Phoenix burns. He is alone. As a world without mankind starts to crumble, August fights not just for survival, but for his very sanity. On the other side of the country, Poe McDowell watches her parents crumble into dust just moments after being shoved inside a coffin-like device that spares her from the same fate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • He's done it again!

  • By Sandra on 09-02-18

All is explained in the final scenes...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

I can see why many other reviewers gave this audiobook high ratings. The writing styles of these co-authors is great for this type of story. I’m ambivalent about the use of present first-person tense – I think I absorb and enjoy stories more when they’re written from a third-person omniscient perspective. Because it’s written in a first-person style that alternates between a male point of view (POV) and a female POV, it’s necessary that we have a male and a female narrator. I’m glad the authors made this decision! Having one narrator voice both the male and female POV would probably have been less effective (especially when narrators exaggerate the other-gender voice, usually to ridiculous extremes), so two thumbs up for using two narrators.

The narrator for the female voice was very effective and authentic, in my opinion. She sounded youngish and a wee bit naïve, good-hearted, and stubborn -- just like my mental picture of Poe. The narrator for the male voice grew on me after a while, but at the beginning I was distracted by the drawl of his voice (reminded me of the actor Patrick Warburton, which was not the mental image that I had of August). I increased the playback speed a bit, and things were fine after that. No major complaints.

Regarding the story itself, the main reason why I gave this story four stars instead of five was because of the pacing and placement of the ‘big reveal’. It’s like, for 95% of the story, as we’re narrowing the distance between August and Poe, we learn about their strange experiences (which I won’t describe, to be spoiler-free) as time passes. However, near the very end of the story, we’re suddenly given the entire explanation, which is kind of complicated and hard (for me, anyway) to absorb. I think it would have been easier for me to process if the authors had dropped more breadcrumbs along the way. As it is, don’t be surprised if you have to rewind a few times and re-listen to the explanation of what the story was about. It kind of felt like the authors were telling a joke, and they told the punchline… but then felt like they had to explain what the joke was because the audience got confused looks on their faces. So, don’t be surprised if you get through most of the story without understanding what’s happening – all will be revealed at the end!

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Zombie Airman

  • By: David Guenther
  • Narrated by: Randolf Rebrick
  • Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

The night of the plague follows sunset on April Fool’s Day around the world. By sunrise, less than fifteen percent of the world’s population is uninfected. The airborne disease is invulnerable to any air filter or disease barrier. The fifteen percent uninfected are still vulnerable to the disease when spread via bodily fluids as the infected seek to spread their disease. These are the stories of those just trying to survive.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting twist to the zombie genre!

  • By RJ on 09-15-18

3.5* zombie adventure

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

3.5* -
As another reviewer mentioned, there are lots of abbreviations used by the author in this audiobook. After each new abbreviation, the author indicates what the abbreviation means. The use of extensive abbreviations is interesting. Abbreviations make communications more efficient for people who understand what the abbreviations mean, but they make communications less efficient for people who don’t know the abbreviations and need the explanations. Also, abbreviations are like a secret language that distinguish members of the ‘in-the-know’ group from individuals who aren’t ‘in the know’, either reinforcing inclusivity or reinforcing boundaries (depending on whether or not you’re ‘in the know’ about the abbreviations). This is a long-winded way of speculating that the author likely gained fans who have military (and related) backgrounds by the use of those abbreviations, but had some of us outsiders scratching our heads in confusion each time an abbreviation was used. Yes, the author gave us the explanation after the abbreviation but it caused confusion first, and then we were given the explanation. I think it would have been better for us noobs if we got the explanation first and then the author followed that with the abbreviation. Less confusing for people like me, while also letting the military readers know that the author is ‘in the know’ about the terminology/abbreviations. Sounds like such a minor thing! But there are a lot of abbreviations in this audiobook and each time the abbreviation was mentioned, it jolted me out of the narrative until the narrator could explain the term.

The only other observation that I would make about the story is that this a very action oriented story and less of a character-driven or plot-driven story. My personal preference (your mileage may vary!) is to understand and engage with the main characters emotionally, but this story focuses more on what the characters are doing rather than what the characters are thinking/feeling. It’s like watching old Godzilla movies. When you watch those Godzilla movies, you hardly get to empathize with any of the human characters. There’s usually an underlying moral message of man’s relationship with nature, but that’s more subtle and instead the focus is on the action and the carnage caused by the monster(s). I think Zombie Airmen is kind of like that.

The narration is good for this type of story and this setting. If I could make one suggestion, it would be that the narrator take slightly longer pauses after each sentence -it would have been easier for me to absorb what he was saying.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Alphabet Soup

  • Horror Stories for the Tormented Soul
  • By: Tobias Wade
  • Narrated by: Paul Jenkins
  • Length: 6 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Discover original horror stories from around the world. Each author chose a letter of the alphabet and was given complete artistic freedom to make something horrible happen. Some stories will be mysterious, others creepy or even profound, but all are crafted to thrill and terrify you to the last word. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting idea, theme adds cohesiveness

  • By Jesse on 08-26-18

Re-listen to connect the stories

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-18

As other reviewers have indicated, this is a compilation of short stories and (like most short story collections) some are more engaging than others. Also, there is an over-arching narrative that connects stories together. Like others here, I started to realize within the first three or four stories that stories were linked. For better or worse, that focused my mind on trying to understand these connections and figure out what it was all about. I say 'for better or worse'. For 'better', because I really like the idea of connected horror stories - it's an interesting way to present a short story collection. For 'worse', because (as other reviewers have noted) things start to get really weird towards the end of the book. The more information that was revealed to me, the more confused I became. I think this is because there were more than two dozen stories to try and connect, and sometimes the connections were very fleeting indeed - in some instances, a mere handful of words in a sentence tugged you back to a previous story. Again, that's very cool! But... um, it might have been easier on my poor brain if the author had used a theme of seven days in a week, or 12 months in a year (fewer stories to connect!). This is definitely a short story collection that I'll want to listen to again, this time with a pen and paper to take notes. It's definitely possible that if I re-listen to the audiobook, things will become more cohesive and clear.

The narration was well done and reflected the rising and falling tension in many of the stories. A minor disconnect for me was that the narrator spoke with a UK accent but the stories were set in the US. There's nothing specifically wrong with that. But, to use a flipped example, if I listen to an audiobook about British history, my preference is that the narrator have a British accent, to make it easier for me to become immersed in the context of the book. So as perverse as it may seem, if this collection of short stories were set in the UK, I'd probably have given the narration 5 stars. Since the stories were clearly set in the US, the British accent of the narrator distracted a small part of my brain that was wanting to hear a more authentic-sounding accent for the region where the stories were occurring.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • The Tree of Penance

  • Society Lost, Volume Three
  • By: Steven Bird
  • Narrated by: J. Scott Bennett
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

Join former sheriff Jessie Townsend as his journey takes him across a nation that is a mere shell of its former self after suffering numerous devastating blows from an orchestrated collapse and the attacks that followed. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hatfields vs. McCoys!

  • By RJ on 09-13-18

Sheeps, wolves, and sheep dogs

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

I took a bit of a risk by jumping into the third installment of this series without having listened to/read the first two volumes. You never know if the author will bring seamlessly into the story arc or if you'll be bewildered by what's going on (like somebody's told an inside joke that you don't 'get'). So.... my review doesn't have the broader context that other reviewers may provide, because I didn't start the series from the beginning.

Well, the good news is that, yes, it is possible to enjoy the third book without reading the first two. The author does a good job with character description, so you can easily get the measure of the main characters. Plus, this story has a VERY small flavour of the old David Carradine series 'Kung Fu', where that protagonist wandered into a new situation with a new cast of characters and plot each week. I got the same sense with 'The Tree of Penance'. The main hero (I believe) has been in the story since the beginning but the rest of the characters in the story are unique to Volume 3. I could be wrong, but that's how I understood it from my perspective. So, no, it's not imperative that you start from the first Volume; the author drops bits and pieces of back story into the narrative so you can sense the recent tragedies in the protagonist's life and the purpose of his larger quest (which he resumes in the final chapter).

The main reason why I deducted a star for the story is that the author doesn't give any details about why/how society collapsed. I'm assuming that this is covered in Volume 1 or Volume 2? All I know from reading Volume 3 is that society DID collapse and we're now in a 21st century 'wild west' environment. To get one more star, I would have loved to know what happened to cause the situation that we're in during Volume 3. If the author didn't want to integrate it into the main story of 'The Tree of Penance', even a brief Forward/Prologue/Introduction would have been sufficient to orient new readers into the series. I have a feeling some serious stuff happened, but there's no mention of armed forces or military, no mention of viruses, no mention of zombies, no mention of government, or anything like that. I would have loved to know what happened to bring down civilization!

I didn't deduct stars due to the brutality of the events in this story, although there is certainly a lot to be uncomfortable about. As my header indicates, we see sheeps, wolves, and sheep dogs. And the wolves are very, very bad. Are humans capable of the kind of brutality that we read about in this story? Yes, I suspect that we are. Interesting, but I wasn't able to identify any female wolves in this story; women were mostly victims, with a few transforming into Charles Bronson 'Death Wish' personas. Perhaps female bad guys made appearances in earlier volumes of this series, but their absence here stood out in my mind (it's something worth reflecting on, I think).

I'm glad I read this story. The author writes very well and tells a compelling story. The narrator was a good pick as well. J. Scott Bennett's style is very complementary to the story - good work! I increased the playback speed a bit, but that's a personal preference for me.

"I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review."

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Ancient Enemy

  • By: Richard A. Bamberg
  • Narrated by: Melissa Williams
  • Length: 11 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

When Greta and her husband move home to Ash Grove, Alabama, they learn they are not the only newcomers to town. The ancient enemy of Greta's family has finally found them and he is there to destroy the family. For a hundred years, they had been safe, and now, even though most of the family no longer believes in their eternal hunter, he is there to prove them wrong. As Greta feels each grisly death in her family, she realizes that it is up to her to stop their ancient enemy once and for all, or die trying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great book

  • By TU on 08-22-18

Supernatural suspense

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-18

I really liked the beginning of this book, which brought us back in time to events in the late 19th century. Dread, tension, and the supernatural - very successful in catching my interest! Fast forward to present day, and the tension relaxed as we were introduced to the main characters. However, as the book progressed, the tension and supernatural menace started to ratchet up again. At the very end, the supernatural plot element took a twist that I'm not sure I liked, though. I suppose I was expecting a certain sub-genre of supernatural thriller and ended up with a different sub-genre at the last minute. As a result, the motive for the 'Ancient Enemy's' existence/behaviour was hard for me to absorb/ understand/ appreciate. I don't want to get into spoiler territory, so I'll leave it at that.

The narration was well done, although my personal preference was to increase the playback speed to pick up the pace a bit.

"I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review."

2 of 2 people found this review helpful