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Tony Loman

St. Louis, MO
  • 19
  • reviews
  • 65
  • helpful votes
  • 26
  • ratings
  • Evolution 2.0: Breaking the Deadlock Between Darwin and Design

  • By: Perry Marshall
  • Narrated by: Perry Marshall
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52

One-hundred-fifty years later, the creation-evolution debate still rages. Both sides are half-right. And both are wrong. Meet the opponents: in one corner - Proponents of Intelligent Design like William Dembski, Stephen Meyer, and Michael Behe. Many defy scientific consensus, maintaining evolution is a fraud. They challenge decades of data in biology, chemistry, genetics, and paleontology.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clear

  • By Tony Loman on 04-12-19

Clear

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-19

Okay, when I saw this was written by an electrical engineer, I almost rejected it out-of-hand. But it promised to address something that has always been a question of mine about evolution. Yes, descent with modification over billions of years is undeniable. But where is the evidence that modification as natural selection occurs only through random mutations. I kept looking but never found any. The empirical evidence of change has been presented often in many books I have read but never with any evidence of random mutations. Marshall presents five alternatives, each with massive experimental evidence. At the same time he resists the temptation to go the route of many intelligent design advocates who make God the direct designer of countless trillions of modifications over 3.7 billion years of life on earth. Get the book as well for references because you will want to go beyond his presentations.

  • Extracted

  • Extracted, Book 1
  • By: R. R. Haywood
  • Narrated by: Carl Prekopp
  • Length: 12 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,230
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,006
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,001

In 2061 a young scientist invents a time machine to fix a tragedy in his past. But his good intentions turn catastrophic when an early test reveals something unexpected: the end of the world. A desperate plan is formed: recruit three heroes, ordinary humans capable of extraordinary things, and change the future.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fast-Food Science Fiction

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 04-07-17

I add my approval

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-17

What made the experience of listening to Extracted the most enjoyable?

Superb dialog, sympathetic characters, great story line at least for this volume, an outstanding reader (Prekopp brings the characters to life), and, oh yes, a time travel plot that makes sense. Not deep, however. Just "fast food scifi" as another reviewer indicated. Please hurry up and get the second volume recorded or I may have to buy the printed book and (horrors) actually read it.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Unspeakable

  • By: Chris Hedges
  • Narrated by: Chris Hedges, Michael Quinlan
  • Length: 4 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 262
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 229
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 225

Chris Hedges has been telling truth to (and against) power since his earliest days as a radical journalist. He is an intellectual bomb-thrower who continues to confront American empire in the most incisive, challenging ways. The kinds of insights he provides into the deeply troubled state of our democracy cannot be found anywhere else.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Complexity of corporate neoliberalism explained

  • By Dwayne on 11-09-16

Like and dislike

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-17

Any additional comments?

Let me start by saying the Chris Hedges book War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning is wonderful. One of the best books on society and war ever written in my humble opinion. It should be required reading in high schools. I found so much that I agree with in the present book, which is a long edited and respoken interview of Hedges, such a corporate influence and control of government, income and resource disparity, disregard by elites of people in need , etc. What I found disconcerting is Hedges need to stereotype everything and everyone. For example, you come away thinking that Hedges believes that all rich elite people are evil, callous and nonredeemable. He tends to throw everyone and everything into one of two baskets: good or evil. For example, Hilary and Donald are both in the evil basket. No need to make any distinctions between them and both should be equally condemned. How simplistic. The interview was good because it informed me about Hedges whom I think is influential on the left but it also convinced me that I should not spend time reading him further. The world is more complex.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Corpse Reader

  • By: Antonio Garrido, Thomas Bunstead (translator)
  • Narrated by: Todd Haberkorn
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 225
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 195

Cí, a young scholar-turned-gravedigger in medieval China, has survived enough horrors and pain to last several lifetimes. He finally has the chance to return to his studies - only to receive orders from the Imperial Court to find the sadistic perpetrator of a series of brutal murders. With lives in jeopardy, Cí finds his gruesome investigation complicated by his old loyalties - and by his growing desire for the enigmatic beauty haunting his thoughts. Is he skilled enough to track down the murderer? Or will the killer claim him first?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A serious disappointment

  • By Jody on 07-13-13

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-16

Great story. Garrido is good. Motivates me to begin reading Chinese history of the period. The main character is well known. Also Todd Haberkorn is as usual a superb reader. He is one the few readers that I search for in selecting books. Check out his reading of the Risk Agent books. Captivating.

  • Tiona

  • Vaz Series #2
  • By: Laurence E. Dahners
  • Narrated by: Stephen R. Thorne
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 82

Tiona, Vaz's daughter, is starting grad school in physics, has a "bad boy" musician boyfriend, and does her own strange variety of charity work at a homeless shelter. Her professor has her start work on a project to try to achieve high-temperature superconduction by doping the graphene membranes her lab partner has figured out how to precipitate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great follow through with Vaz and family

  • By Paula G. on 10-10-18

Better and better

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-16

Liked Daz. Tiona is better. Wonderful depiction of a man on the spectrum and his family. Tiona character is sufficiently complex to hold your interest. overall good science... okay, maybe a little far out but it is science fiction isn't it? Also the plot is satisfying for those of us who like morality tales.

  • Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen

  • The Miles Vorkosigan Adventures, Book 17
  • By: Lois McMaster Bujold
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 12 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,342
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,245
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,242

Future imperfect: Three years after her famous husband's death, Cordelia Vorkosigan, widowed vicereine of Sergyar, stands ready to spin her life in a new direction. Oliver Jole, admiral, Sergyar Fleet, finds himself caught up in her web of plans in ways he'd never imagined, bringing him to an unexpected crossroads in his life. Meanwhile, Miles Vorkosigan, one of Emperor Gregor's key investigators, this time dispatches himself on a mission of inquiry into a mystery he never anticipated - his own mother.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Back to Barrayar

  • By Don Gilbert on 02-04-16

Great performance by Gardner, Slow and Boring book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-16

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

If the plot had been structured like those of the other books in Vorkosigan series. They all combined interesting characters, evolving and devolving relationships with action and interesting adventures. This book was simply a romance novel set in the future. Really disappointing.

Would you ever listen to anything by Lois McMaster Bujold again?

Yes. She is one of the best scifi/fantasy writers ever. I realize that some may like the book but, for me, many of the romance sections could have been excised or shortened and something involving tension/conflict/action/danger should have been introduced. Her earlier book on Miles' courtship did this and was wonderful reading.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Fifty Degrees Below

  • Science in the Capital, Book 2
  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim, Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Length: 20 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100

Best-selling, award-winning, author Kim Stanley Robinson continues his groundbreaking trilogy of eco-thrillers - and propels us deeper into the awesome whirlwind of climatic change. Set in our nation's capital, here is a chillingly realistic tale of people caught in the collision of science, technology, and the consequences of global warming - which could trigger another phenomenon: abrupt climate change, resulting in temperatures. BONUS AUDIO: Includes an exclusive introduction by author Kim Stanley Robinson.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Read for the hearing impaired?

  • By Jonathan Gwiazda on 07-08-14

Domestic comedy, serious underlying climate theme

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-14

Would you listen to Fifty Degrees Below again? Why?

Yes, in a year or two because I enjoyed so many of the scenes. Robinson's affection for his fictitious characters is contagious. And so much of the book rings true, at least in my experience with children, scientists and academics.

Which character – as performed by Peter Ganim and Kim Stanley Robinson – was your favorite?

Liked several but would have to say Charlie.

Any additional comments?

Several have commented on the reader Ganim. He narrates very deliberately and I know this irritates some people who want the narration to be very dramatic. I just focused on the content rather than the slow reading style. I think he did a great job on the dialogue, though, using different voices, inflections and accents. As to the underlying theme of the book, Robinson is able to insert important little treatises on climate change and on the role of scientists in society without coming across as pedantic. I liked that.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Price of Inequality

  • How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future
  • By: Joseph E. Stiglitz
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 854
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 733
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 740

The top 1 percent of Americans control 40 percent of the nation's wealth. And, as Joseph E. Stiglitz explains, while those at the top enjoy the best health care, education, and benefits of wealth, they fail to realize that "their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live." Stiglitz draws on his deep understanding of economics to show that growing inequality is not inevitable. He examines our current state, then teases out its implications for democracy, for monetary and budgetary policy, and for globalization. He closes with a plan for a more just and prosperous future.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • An explosion of ideas with no depth

  • By P. Smith on 02-03-15

Convincing arguments

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-12

Would you consider the audio edition of The Price of Inequality to be better than the print version?

I think it is easier to listen but the print or Kindle (which I have) version helps with tables, charts, and statistics provided in the text. In order to recall it later I find that it helps to read as well as hear that type of material. Also, the book contained detailed footnotes and references. By having the print version, I was able to look up reference materials and read it myself.

What did you like best about this story?

This is nonfiction but there is nonetheless a story line tracing the development of inequality over the 20th Century. The most important message is that inequality hurts everyone including those at the top and that a certain amount of income and wealth leveling is good for everyone.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Winner Take All

  • China's Race for Resources and What It Means for the World
  • By: Dambisa Moyo
  • Narrated by: Ken Perlstein
  • Length: 9 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 27

Winner Take All is about the commodity dynamics that the world will face over the next several decades. In particular, it is about the implications of China’s rush for resources across all regions of the world. The scale of China’s resource campaign for hard commodities (metals and minerals) and soft commodities (timber and food) is among the largest in history.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Reader is Terrible

  • By Barton Berg on 07-13-12

Great book, poor reader

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-12

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I agree with most of the other reviewers that Ken was not the best choice for narrator. He seems to read words rather than sentences, and often emphasizes the wrong words. In some cases I had to restate the sentences in my head before they made sense. Pronunciation is generally good but he sometimes skips articles, like "a" and "the" when he comes to a word that is going to be difficult. This distracts from an otherwise excellent book. Nonetheless, I think it was well worth my time in spite of the reader. I was gratified to discover that the book is about much more than China. Moyo sets each resource in its international context before telling us how China is reacting. The book evidently has many charts and graphs and it would have been nice to have those available while I listened, andI think I am going to buy the print version so that I can go back and look at the graphics. I will put it next to Gilding's, The Great Disruption, another book worth listening to.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Ken Perlstein?

The great Grover Gardner would have been better.

  • Revelations

  • Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation
  • By: Elaine Pagels
  • Narrated by: Lorna Raver
  • Length: 6 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 357
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 300
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 297

Elaine Pagels explores the surprising history of the most controversial book of the Bible. In the waning days of the Roman Empire, militant Jews in Jerusalem had waged anall-out war against Rome’s occupation of Judea, and their defeat resulted in the desecration of the Great Temple in Jerusalem. In the aftermath of that war, John of Patmos, a Jewish prophet and follower of Jesus, wrote the Book of Revelation, prophesying God’s judgment on the pagan empire that devastated and dominated his people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Revealing "Revelations"

  • By Diane on 05-13-12

Historical view of Revelations

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-12

In this book, Pagels puts Revelations in its historical context and shows how it lies in the tradition of Jewish prophetic/apocalyptic literature and how it may be related to gnostic-Christian literature. She described, correctly in my opinion, how it was really a rather close thing that the book came to be included in the New Testament--still being debated in the 3rd and 4th centuries, as the canon was solidified. Pagel's book is required reading for anyone who thinks the New Testament and particularly the book of Revelations was simply dropped out of the sky by God one day. She devotes a good deal of space in the book to Athanasius, the bishop of Alexandria. Was he a saint, a villain, or both? Fascinating account--how he co-opted the monasteries, how his Life of Anthony, the book that so influenced later Christians, is likely rather pure fiction to promote Church control of monasteries. Athanasius was responsible for suppressing gnostic writings (and, of course, Arius) and may have been the ultimate cause of the gnostic books being hidden at Nag Hammadi. Since this was the time of Emperor Constantine, Athanasius had to reinterpret the beast in Revelations to refer to Christian heretics rather than its rather obvious original 1st century reference to the Roman Empire. This is but one example, as she points out, of the continuing reinterpretation of the symbolism in this book over subsequent centuries to explain present calamities or to predict future ones. Lots more to the book than I can cover here. I thoroughly enjoyed the it. I also liked the reader--strong female voice for a strong writer.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful