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John B

MILFORD, NEW JERSEY, United States
  • 16
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 83
  • ratings
  • London Fields

  • By: Martin Amis
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 21 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 105
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 105

The murderee is Nicola Six, a "black hole" of sex and self-loathing who is intent on orchestrating her own extinction. The murderer may be Keith Talent, a violent lowlife whose only passions are pornography and darts; or the rich, honorable, and dimly romantic Guy Clinch. As Nicola leads her suitors towards the precipice, London--and, indeed, the whole world--seems to shamble after them in a corrosively funny novel of complexity and morality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Gary Regan on 06-30-13

This needs to be listened to by more people

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-14

This was a fantastic book. I have been a fan of both Martin Amis and Steven Pacey in the past. They are both excellent at what they do, and to have them come together for this title made this one excellent work to listen to. This book kept me enthralled for its entirety. I don't know if it is marked as a thriller, but I was still wondering what was going to happen until the last 10 minutes.

Martin Amis' characters are all terrible people. Accept and enjoy that and you will love this book. Other than that, they are funny, and flawed, and excellent characters. Sure, they may ride the lines of being stereotypes, but they're portrayed in an interesting way.

Then there is Steven Pacey. I am not afraid to acknowledge that Pacey is the best narrator I've listened to and I have over 100 audiobooks completed and he is in fine form here. His characters all sound great and easily distinguishable. He really added a lot and almost tips the scale to make listening to this book the superior choice.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Scrolls of Xavier

  • Xavier, Book 1
  • By: John Ashley
  • Narrated by: Matt Weight
  • Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 24

In the year 2067, a new world is discovered amidst the dark expanses of the universe. Harvesting the resources of this vast new planet, known as Xavier997, may be the only hope a post-apocalyptic Earth has for survival. Upon arriving, however, the explorers of this promising new world soon discover they are not the only ones interested in Xavier's rich resources, forcing mankind to fight for the new home they need so desperately, as well as defend the one they already have.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Crude, militaristic sci-fi

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 04-06-13

Commendable effort

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-24-13

What did you like best about The Scrolls of Xavier? What did you like least?

The thing I liked and disliked the most were the planet that the story took place on. John Ashley obviously had a plan, and if it were expressed more it could have been very interesting, but there is no real picture painted of the world other than a thought about a quarter of the way through that only described it as "Earth-like"

I would have liked to have his vision of the planet conveyed in a better way so that I could attempt to see what he sees when he thinks about the world.

Would you recommend The Scrolls of Xavier to your friends? Why or why not?

No. The people I would recommend the book too are middle schoolers (and that is in no way an insult). There is a lot of leeway in science fiction, but even still there were a lot of plot holes and some lazy writing that could be a hang up for older readers.

What aspect of Matt Weight’s performance would you have changed?

I hated, and I mean HATED that Mr. Weight changed the voice for the same character for narration and speaking. The book is written in the first person and so when the main character is not talking Mr. Weight spoke the text normally, but then when the main character does speak Weight adds unnecessary gruffness. It gave me a real Christian Bale as Batman vibe. The first person narration was Christian Bale as Bruce Wayne, and the speaking was Christian Bale as Batman... It was ridiculous.

Another thing was the accents. Mr. Weight seemed confident with his russian and english accents, but not so much with his irish and israeli (though one can argue that an israeli soldier doesn't have to be from israel I'd think that their force would mainly be from that area in the future). I'd prefer no accents to a couple, but there wasn't much dialogue from any but the english character, so this complaint is negligible.

One thing I did very much like was Mr. Weight's french and russian. Those were very good.

Could you see The Scrolls of Xavier being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Maybe, but it'd need a few rewrites.

Any additional comments?

I'll start by saying that this is a very commendable first effort.

The problem, however, with this audiobook is a mix of questionable writing and narrating. I've already pointed out the problems with the narration I had, but as far as the writing goes, a lot of it just seemed lazy.

(I don't consider it a spoiler, but alert just in case)

4 of the 5 sub missions in the book were, essentially, the same. Fly there, find enemy's base, stir up trouble, bring main character inches from death, save main character, planes come before the horde gets to the group.

There are a few other things that I'll write somewhere else, but it all combined to make me a little disappointed. However, I acknowledge that I may not be the intended audience.

  • The Blade Itself

  • The First Law: Book One
  • By: Joe Abercrombie
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 22 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,057
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,068

Inquisitor Glokta, a crippled and bitter relic of the last war, former fencing champion turned torturer, is trapped in a twisted and broken body - not that he allows it to distract him from his daily routine of torturing smugglers.Nobleman, dashing officer and would-be fencing champion Captain Jezal dan Luthar is living a life of ease by cheating his friends at cards. Vain and shallow, the biggest blot on his horizon is having to get out of bed in the morning to train with obsessive and boring old men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Violent, Ironic, and Absorbing Epic Fantasy Noir

  • By Jefferson on 01-30-13

Examines the genre and exemplifies it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-13

I'll put it bluntly to start. Both Abercrombie and Pacey are masters at their craft.

Joe Abercrombie has penned a series that not only examines, and at times parodies, the fantasy genre, but also created a brilliant example for it. All of main characters are very well written.

Steven Pacey's performance in all of the books are the best bit of narrating I've ever heard. He has amazing ability and it really makes the audio shine. He can make all of the characters unique and interesting to hear, and he brings all of the subtle emotions to the surface with his brilliant acting ability.

The only reason that this book was not 5s across the board is that this, the first book in the series, is mainly just a set up for the rest of the series. The first alone does not accomplish much in it's own right, but the set up is still entertaining and definitely leads to a great series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Red Country

  • By: Joe Abercrombie
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 19 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,905
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,587
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,571

They burned her home. They stole her brother and sister. But vengeance is following. Shy South hoped to bury her bloody past and ride away smiling, but she'll have to sharpen up some bad old ways to get her family back, and she's not a woman to flinch from what needs doing. She sets off in pursuit with only a pair of oxen and her cowardly old step father Lamb for company. But it turns out Lamb's buried a bloody past of his own. And out in the lawless Far Country the past never stays buried.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Justice can have what's left when I'm done.

  • By Lore on 10-02-13

Not a single gripe!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-13

This is my first entry into the first law universe, and I was very pleased.

Abercrombie and Pacey make an amazing duo. What is an extremely entertaining and brilliant story is only enhanced with great narration. I can only say good things about the epic story, the interesting characters, and the world I can't wait to hear more about. I am just so very glad that the First Law trilogy is also narrated by Mr. Pacey! If you are interested but still on the fence, listen to this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • City of Thieves

  • By: David Benioff
  • Narrated by: Ron Perlman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,137
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,187
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,178

A writer visits his retired grandparents in Florida to document their experience during the infamous siege of Leningrad. His grandmother won't talk about it, but his grandfather reluctantly consents. The result is the captivating odyssey of two young men trying to survive against desperate odds. Lev Beniov considers himself "built for deprivation." He's small, smart, and insecure, a Jewish virgin too young for the army, who spends his nights working as a volunteer firefighter with friends from his building.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning Tale. Great Narration.

  • By Paul on 10-24-09

I wanted to like it less!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-13

This is very difficult. You see, dear reader, I wanted to like this book a lot less. That may seem very harsh and unfair, but it is true. It is for the sole reason that the premise is kind of ridiculous. A looter and a deserter are tasked with finding a dozen eggs in Russia during WWII. That's right, eggs. Not to mention that it seemed the author thought that, while the middle of the chapters could seem a little too light hearted at times (the protagonists pick some strange times to talk about girls), the end of the chapters always seemed to have a scene intended to add to the drama whether it was the protagonists actually finding themselves in a precarious position, or just a sad scene the characters stumble upon.

Like I said, these happened at the end of every chapter, but to give credit where credit is due, they never feel too forced. I wanted to like this book less for these reasons, true, but I couldn't and found myself having enjoyed the book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • You Are Not So Smart

  • Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself
  • By: David McRaney
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,165
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,766
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,756

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise. You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's official, I'm an idiot

  • By Christopher on 07-04-12

A review for the not so smart

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-13

It's ironic to write a review for a book that has a section that slightly mocks reviews, but I'll do it anyway.

This is not my first trip into a psychology book, but it is the one of the most interesting. I've heard a lot of the studies before, and at the beginning I was worried that I'd have heard every single piece of evidence that was going to be mentioned. Luckily, I was very wrong. I found many new studies and they were all told in a way that I found both entertaining and informing.

Most psychology books are a pretty easy 4 stars with me, but the way this one was presented made me have to give it a boost above the other ones.

  • Healey's Cave

  • By: Aaron Paul Lazar
  • Narrated by: John Thomas Fraser
  • Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 13

Sam Moore's little brother vanished 50 years ago. No body. No answers. What Sam has is a boatload of guilt, since he failed to accompany Billy on his final, fateful bike ride. While struggling to eliminate the rapacious Japanese Knotweed from his gardens, Sam discovers a glowing marble. It warms to his touch and whisks him back in time to his childhood. Billy and Sam's childhood pals appear beside him - breathing,sweating, laughing - and very much alive.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Tidy little mystery

  • By Fran on 02-10-13

Print may be the way to go.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-13

It was my pleasure to be given a copy of this audiobook in exchange for this review.

I'm going to start with the elephant in the room, by which I mean the narration. Now, I had no problems with Mr. Fraser's voice. I thought he was a pretty good fit for the retired Dr. Moore. That said, there were a few choices that I found to be less than ideal and that took me out of the story for a few moments.

For example, and in my best attempt to avoid spoilers, there was a scene that involved Sam and his son in which I would have expected the characters to be flooded with a range of emotions like concern or compassion, but the way it was read made the characters seem like nothing had just happened and that they didn't have a care in the world (If you listen to this, you may have an idea of the scene I am speaking of).

I found this to be odd, because it seemed as if Mr. Fraser wanted to include some feeling of immersion. When the narration stated that a character had chuckled, Fraser chuckled the line. It just seemed wrong that the narrative included more emotion than the actual dialogue did.

There also seemed to be a complete lack of spacing between chapters. Instead of a new chapter starting at the beginning of a new paragraph, it seemed as if the chapters started right in the middle. Again, this can be an example of the narrator's attempts at immersion (or an example at my attempts at nitpicking). An attempt to keep the flow of the story going with little distraction, but instead it caused me to pause and take notice.

This story is award winning, and with good reason. Its an excellent read, and I'd hate for people to disregard it because the narration isn't all it could be. I still would suggest people take the time to read this book, just maybe that they stick with print and read it on their own instead.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Set the Night on Fire

  • By: Libby Fischer Hellmann
  • Narrated by: Diane Piron-Gelman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

Someone is trying to kill Lila Hilliard. During the Christmas holidays she returns from running errands to find her family home in flames, her father and brother trapped inside. Later, she is attacked by a mysterious man on a motorcycle ... and the threats don’t end there. As Lila desperately tries to piece together who is after her and why, she uncovers information about her father’s past in Chicago during the volatile days of the late 1960s ... information he never shared with her, but now threatens to destroy her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Mystery / Thriller

  • By Snoodely on 01-18-13

I'm no child of the 60's, but it was still great.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-13

I got this audiobook for free in exchange for this review, and it was a true pleasure to be given the opportunity to listen to this book, and I'll do my best to fulfill my obligation in a way that does justice to an excellent audiobook.

The story itself was a great thrill. It was fast paced and kept my interest throughout. I found myself going from present, to past, and back to present in a way that flowed very well. The author was able to keep the expert balance in mystery/thriller novels that many simply cannot, and that was her ability to reveal while also never making it obvious, and the whole time avoiding plot holes that can easily plague a title of this genre. The ending was satisfying, and I never felt my excitement lessen throughout the reading.

The reading itself was good, and Diane Gelman did a fair job in portraying characters in a realistic way. She was able to express the emotions that the characters were feeling, but never went overboard with it. By that, I mean that there was no sense that something was being done overdramatically. With that style, some parts could come off as flat, but all the more subtle emotions in the speaking were there and well presented.

Again, it was a great listen, and I am very grateful that I was given the opportunity to listen and review this work.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Avengers and Philosophy

  • Earth's Mightiest Thinkers
  • By: William Irwin (editor), Mark D. White (editor)
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Arthur
  • Length: 6 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

Avengers assemble! Tackling intriguing dilemmas and issues that no single great philosopher can withstand, this powerful book enlists the brainpower of an A-list team of history's most prominent thinkers to explore the themes behind the action of Marvel Comics' all-star superhero team. This thought-provoking book will help you understand this band of superheroes better, whether you've followed the Avengers for years or are a Joss Whedon fan just getting to know them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Super? Eh, not quite.

  • By John B on 12-28-12

Super? Eh, not quite.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-12

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

I'd say so. I was hoping for more wide ranging psych ideas, but it was not completely disappointing.

Would you be willing to try another book from William Irwin (editor) and Mark D. White (editor) ? Why or why not?

I've seen the other titles and most follow the same "____ and psychology" setup. Most of which I'm, unfortunately, not interested in.

Any additional comments?

I did enjoy this book. It took many characters and events for the avengers under the microscope, but there was some things that just felt missing. I thought some important characters were left out in favor of lesser characters. We all love our favorite archer Hawkeye, but did he deserve to take spotlight away from the Hulk, one of the listed Avengers founders who was not examined? I walso would have liked to hear the psychology aspects applied in a broader sense, as I have seen in other comic hero psych books. But, these things do not completely take away from a quick and entertaining listen.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • King of Thorns

  • By: Mark Lawrence
  • Narrated by: James Clamp
  • Length: 13 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,971
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,814
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,811

The follow-up to Mark Lawrence' s thrilling debut novel Prince of Thorns, King of Thorns continues the tale of antihero Jorg Ancrath. After wresting back control of his kingdom from those who murdered his family, Jorg sees the land erupt with hundreds of battles fought by lords and petty kings. More daunting still, he faces an enemy many times his own strength. Jorg may not be able to win this battle in a fair fight, but he wields a rage and cunning that just might even the odds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Still no Unicorns ,,, but

  • By Todd on 05-27-14

The second step to becoming my favorite trilogy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-12

The title is not an exaggeration. This trilogy is shaping up to become one of my favorite reads in a long time, and this, the middle child in all of it, does not disappoint in the slightest. If you've read the first one you already know of the dark prince, and it should not be surprising that he remains dark even when his title advances to king (even if that title is somewhat self proclaimed), but we the listeners are also treated to hearing how Jorg Ancrath evolves over the years. And its a believable evolution because it keeps the perfect balance of being significant, without being drastic. So, in some ways he is the same prince we learned to love in the first book, but he also is maturing. This book also reveals more about the world of the Hundred War, something that is extremely interesting to learn, and added a lot to my enjoyment of the tale.

But enough about how amazing the book is, the narrator also deserves his praise!

Once again, James Clamp has done an AMAZING job. He nails every part of his performance. All the characters retain their individuality, and the acting is superb. Setting him with the task to read this book was really a match made in heaven and I simply can not wait to hear him reading the last installment.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful