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Magpie

  • 22
  • reviews
  • 894
  • helpful votes
  • 429
  • ratings
  • Breathe

  • By: Kristen Ashley
  • Narrated by: Emma Taylor
  • Length: 21 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,145
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,966
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,968

In Carnal, Colorado, Faye Goodknight is the town's quiet, shy librarian. She may also be Carnal's last remaining virgin. For years, Faye has had a crush on Chace Keaton, but the gorgeous cop has always been unattainable. She's resigned to live contentedly with only her books for company-until Faye suddenly meets Chace alone in the woods.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another Excellent Installment in This Series

  • By Sharon on 08-28-14

This is not remotely sexy.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

Could someone explain to me how it's at all sexy to have a man grabbing you by the neck every 5 minutes? This dude is outrageously controlling. Sure, he's been through a lot, and his moodiness is understandable, but the condescension... chick may be a virgin and a dreamer, but she's not a five year old. And if you think she's that much of an idiot, perhaps you should move on. Then there's the incessant swearing - and it's not even creative! Just F- this and S-that.

I am a serious nerd. I think the only way I made it even halfway through this book were the scifi shows referenced. That being said, how a nerd woman who admires Mal and Inara from Firefly could find this man at all acceptable is super beyond me.

Honey, you couldn't PAY Inara to put up with this guy. Do yourself a favor and get him outta your system, move to Denver, and find a nice geek boy who'll respect you, understand your BSG references, and never EVER hold you by the back of the neck.



  • A Man Called Ove

  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64,459
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,982
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58,885

Meet Ove. He's a curmudgeon - the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Laughed and I Cried

  • By Bill on 08-22-15

Absolutely Lovely Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-17

So I admit it: I despised Ove at the beginning of this book. So much so, I almost stopped listening. I'm so grateful I didn't. I caught myself smiling as I listened to this story quite often. And even laughing out loud. The characters are beautifully rendered and I loved Parvaneh so much, I want her to be my neighbor. If you enjoy character driven stories this book is absolutely for you - they don't get much better than this. The pacing was also perfect, and while there was past/present jumping, you always knew where you were thanks to the chapter headings.
The narration was practically perfect, George Newbern's voice never overwhelms the story, and there were only a couple of mannerisms that caught me out, but never enough to remove me from the flow of the book.
Lovely story, I highly recommend it.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Nothing Girl

  • The Frogmorton Farm Series, Book 1
  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Lucy Price-Lewis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,575
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,406
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,401

Getting a life isn't always easy. And hanging on to it is even harder.... Jodi Taylor brings all her comic writing skills to this heartwarming tale of self-discovery. Known as The Nothing Girl because of her severe stutter and chronically low self-confidence, Jenny Dove is only just prevented from ending it all by the sudden appearance of Thomas, a mystical golden horse only she can see. Under his guidance Jenny unexpectedly acquires a husband - the charming and chaotic Russell Checkland.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not To Be Missed!

  • By Kindle Customer mmr on 03-28-15

This book makes me smile

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-16

If you're looking for solidly good writing, clever turns of phrase, and a delightful listen that seems to go too quickly, you've found it. There is even an element or two of mystery and a tiny yet mighty donkey - all narrated very skillfully by Lucy Price-Lewis.
This is not some twee romance. Do yourself a favor and pick this up, then smile your way through a long drive, doing the dishes, cleaning fish, or any other seemingly endless, tedious activity.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • You

  • By: Caroline Kepnes
  • Narrated by: Santino Fontana
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,135
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,183
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,165

Beck is everything Joe has ever wanted: she's gorgeous, tough, razor-smart, and sexy beyond his wildest dreams. Joe needs to have her, and he'll stop at nothing to do so. As he begins to insinuate himself into her life - her friendships, her email, her phone - she can’t resist her feelings for a guy who seems custom-made for her. So when her boyfriend, Benji, mysteriously disappears, Beck and Joe fall into a tumultuous affair. But there's more to Beck than her oh-so-perfect façade.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow. This. Book.

  • By Em on 07-17-15

Well Written, Yet Horrible

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-15

From a purely mechanical/intellectual perspective, this book is great. It's well written and from the stalker's first person perspective, the characters are not one dimensional, there's some humor, and many fun literary and pop culture references. If you like hanging in the head of a narcissist/psychopath in mild mannered book seller's clothing - you'll really enjoy this.
From a totally personal perspective, I was grateful when this book was over. I did *not* like hanging out in Joe's head, and I wouldn't have even given this book a chance if I hadn't gotten the impression from the summary that Joe's obsession would give as good as she got. I won't give spoilery details other than to say: she doesn't.
The narrator is, indeed, as fabulous as everyone says. So if you like a well narrated, well written book set in the head of a highly intelligent, super sick bastich - you will enjoy this. If you're not a fan of hanging out in the irredeemable dank and dark, give this one a pass.I wish I had.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust

  • Flavia de Luce, Book 7
  • By: Alan Bradley
  • Narrated by: Jayne Entwistle
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,209
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,096
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,093

Flavia de Luce - "part Harriet the Spy, part Violet Baudelaire from Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" ( The New York Times Book Review) - takes her remarkable sleuthing prowess to the unexpectedly unsavory world of Canadian boarding schools in the captivating new mystery from New York Times best-selling author Alan Bradley.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Doesn't live up to it's promise.

  • By Magpie on 02-04-15

Doesn't live up to it's promise.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-15

There was so much more Alan Bradley could have done with this book that I find it especially disappointing. Flavia is marvelous, as always, and I was really looking forward to reading about her in a school setting. The joys of having access to a whole new set of information, meeting kids her own age, making lifelong connections – this could have been several books of watching Flavia grow in an environment that could hone her skills and with people who could challenge her in new ways. Instead, we got an uneven and choppy book that felt like filler rather than something that advanced Flavia’s story.
Flavia noticing things other people don’t at home made sense a combination average village life dulling the senses of the adults around and an extraordinarily precocious child make for a perfect combination. Miss Bodycote’s is, however, supposed to be home to a group of people dedicated to turning out, for lack of a better term, spies. And yet Flavia easily gets away with her tricks, no one has noticed the bits of the mystery that she does, and no one will really talk to her about what’s going on when she's supposed to be part of an inner sanctum. Quite honestly, the story practically doesn't make any sense at all.
So why three stars when I really wanted to give it two? Because it’s Flavia. I really do adore the character and there are a few others introduced I thought were fun and interesting.
As for the performance – Jane Entwistle always gets 5 stars. Her narrative style is terrific: pronunciation, pacing, and characterization are always top notch!

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Soul Mirror

  • A Novel of the Collegia Magica
  • By: Carol Berg
  • Narrated by: Angele Masters
  • Length: 18 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191

With no magic talent of her own, Anne de Vernase must take on her sister's magical legacy to unravel the secrets behind the dark sorcery besieging the royal city of Merona-and to uncover the truth behind her sister's death. For Portier de Savin-Duplais, failed student of magic, sorcery's decline into ambiguity and cheap illusion is but a culmination of life's bitter disappointments.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Story!

  • By Karen on 01-08-12

A frustrating listen

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-14

The story was entertaining, if not earth shattering. Honestly I think I would have liked this book better had I read it myself. While the narrator's voice wasn't bad (if a bit flat), her pronunciation was terrible (Especially considering the narrator of the first book was quite good). The biggest example is the word "mage." In Brit or American English it has a single pronunciation, and if she was trying to use the french pronunciation, even that was wrong. Considering how often the word "mage" is used, it's incredibly grating. Then there are the inconsistencies in pronunciation from book to book of character and place names. The editors on this audio didn't do their job.
If poor pronunciation drives you to distraction, give this one a pass.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Happy Hour in Hell

  • Bobby Dollar, Volume 2
  • By: Tad Williams
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 393
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 368
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 368

I've been told to go to Hell more times than I can count. But this time I'm actually going. My name's Bobby Dollar, sometimes known as Doloriel, and of course, Hell isn't a great place for someone like me - I'm an angel. They don't like my kind down there, not even the slightly fallen variety. But they have my girlfriend, who happens to be a beautiful demon named Casimira, Countess of Cold Hands. Why does an angel have a demon girlfriend? Well, certainly not because it helps my career.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Mixed feelings

  • By A. Hogue on 10-09-13

Let me explain. No, there is too much; let me sum up

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-14

So you don't waste your credit on this book I'm going to sum up the entire middle of it for you: Hell is awful, Bobby Dollar is an idiot, Cas is really beautiful. No, really Hell is every bit as bad as you ever imagined, Bobby Dollar has the decision making skills of a hormonally carbonated adolescent, and Cas is the hottest thing since the sun! We know that cause we're hit over the head with it over, and over, and OVER.
I kept expecting Dollar to stop at some point and say "Hey, something must be up here, because I'm this angel who was a pretty big bad ass, so this thinking with my genitalia about a woman, whose only redeeming quality is her looks has to stop." At which point the plot would advance.
Nope.
The only reason this thing makes 2 stars is the beginning and end were decent. Not enough to make up for the middle, though. Not even close. Also the narrator was good, so should be acknowledged.




11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Midnight Riot

  • Peter Grant, Book 1
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 9 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,824
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,421
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,412

Probationary constable Peter Grant dreams of being a detective in London's Metropolitan Police. Too bad his superior plans to assign him to the Case Progression Unit, where the biggest threat he'll face is a paper cut. But Peter's prospects change in the aftermath of a puzzling murder, when he gains exclusive information from an eyewitness who happens to be a ghost. Peter's ability to speak with the lingering dead brings him to the attention of Detective Chief Inspector Thomas Nightingale....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I LOVE this Book!

  • By Nancy J on 02-26-13

Nothing Like Harry Potter - which is just fine!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-13

Don't get me wrong, I *love* the Harry Potter series - but this is a totally different animal. The only things they have in common are magic and infinitely listenable writing styles.
I don't know what I can add that others have not - I have never read/listened to a police procedural that was quite this detailed before - but I also haven't read many. I really enjoy the way Peter, the main character takes what he's learned from being a cop in general and transitions it to dealing with his wholly new experiences with the supernatural.
This is a very adult novel, it's got some horrific scenes, as well as use of language, and sexual situations. None of it is gratuitous, however, it all slides well into the story.
I read a couple of pans involving how british this book is - in that there are some words and phrases americans wouldn't necessarily get. The book was written for a british audience and I don't mind popping over to google to look up "punter" (cause it certainly isn't talking about football players) and other such words as well as place names I wouldn't know by hearing in the book.
As a narrator, for the most part Holdbrook-Smith does a bangup job. He does most of the accents so well, that when he flubbed one by not being able to maintain it, I still gave him a pass. The only thing that really gets on me are the occasional mouth noises that leave me wanting to say "swallow!". I enjoy that he acts the book as opposed to just reading it and I'm glad he does the whole series as it's been published in the US so far.
I really recommend this book to those who enjoy urban fantasy. Particularly fans of Harry Dresden. He has some fun takes on issues Dresden has encountered (such as magic farbing technology) and the main character's enjoyable wit, along with self expressed flaws put me in mind of that series. Though once again - different animals, but equally as enjoyable.

23 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • An Unquenchable Thirst

  • A Memoir
  • By: Mary Johnson
  • Narrated by: Mary Johnson
  • Length: 19 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44

An unforgettable spiritual autobiography about a search for meaning that begins alongside one of the great religious icons of our time and ends with a return to the secular world. At seventeen, Mary Johnson saw Mother Teresa’s face on the cover of Time and experienced her calling. Eighteen months later, she entered a convent in the South Bronx to begin her religious training. Not without difficulty, this bright, independent-minded Texas teenager eventually adapted to the sisters’ austere life of poverty and devotion, and in time became close to Mother Teresa herself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A light reader enjoys the deep

  • By Magpie on 03-26-13

A light reader enjoys the deep

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-13

I admit it: I’m a scifi, fantasy, YA kinda reader/listener. I like light reading; “The Help” is the deepest book I’d gotten into for a loooong time before this one. So why did I pick this up? A woman I know is Mary Johnson’s sister, and she mentioned it, so I read the synopsis and thought “Why not?”
Never did I think a book this deep could “read” so easily. It was marvelous to have the author do the reading as well. She did most every accent brilliantly and I could see her “characters” through the voices she used. Mary Johnson’s story is fascinating, even if it’s difficult because of it's deeply personal nature. There were times I cringed for her, but her style of writing made is so clear and lovely, I couldn't stop listening. I wanted to know what she would choose to do next.
The thing that was toughest for me was the feeling that in the early years of Mary’s involvement with the MC’s had too many parallels to an emotionally abusive relationship. Add to that the king rat tangle of Mother Teresa’s focus on suffering and slavish devotion to dogma, the inability of many sisters to truly lead rather than intimidate, and a lack of methods for proper communication within the order and you can't help but see what hinders a group that does so much good, yet could be so much more not only for the poor, but for the sisters themselves.
To balance that, for all Ms. Johnson does to reveal the faults and flaws of the Missionaries of Charity, her obvious love for the good of it shines through. She shows clearly those sisters and Priests who are amazingly real human beings that manage to transcend the limitations and reveal the love that is Mother Teresa's most basic message for the order.
Mary Johnson takes us down a rough road with such integrity, intellect, and thoughtfulness; you can’t help but want to take this trip with her.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Hounded

  • The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 1
  • By: Kevin Hearne
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 8 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,061
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,003
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,939

Atticus O’Sullivan, last of the Druids, lives peacefully in Arizona, running an occult bookshop and shape-shifting in his spare time to hunt with his Irish wolfhound. His neighbors and customers think that this handsome, tattooed Irish dude is about twenty-one years old - when in actuality, he’s twenty-one centuries old. Not to mention: He draws his power from the earth, possesses a sharp wit, and wields an even sharper magical sword known as Fragarach, the Answerer. Unfortunately, a very angry Celtic god wants that sword, and he’s hounded Atticus for centuries....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Finally, a modern day fantasy that really hits the

  • By Chris on 01-02-12

Tasty if Not Terribly Filling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-13

This book (and the series in general) remind me of a good beer. It's unlikely to change your life, but an enjoyable way to spend some time away from your everyday.
What really *makes* this book though (aside from the interactions between Atticus and Oberon) is Luke Daniels' narration. Does passable accents, smooth reader and characterization of the Widow McDunnah and voice for Oberon is flat out fun. Takes the book from a drinkable Corona to a flavorful microbrew..

9 of 12 people found this review helpful