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  • Bridgeworld, Volume 1

  • By: Travis McBee
  • Narrated by: KC Johnston
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Will's life had always been normal. Normal school, normal friends, normal small town. But he had always thought that his parents might be a bit abnormal. Little does he know that they have been hiding a secret from him his entire life. Not only are they not normal, they're not even from Earth. And when Will is suddenly given a chance to attend the Bridgeworld Academy, his parents' alma mater in space, he finds out just how little he knew.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Small town, small world, great listen!

  • By BB on 03-23-19

Calling Gary Stu

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-19

Will, our main character, is a male version of a Mary Sue. He has no flaws and anything bad that happens is never his fault. As an example, Will's football team, for which he is the quarterback, loses "The Big Game". the High School coach for the team that Will is planning on joining, congratulates Will for his efforts and says "You'll make a great receiver". Will's response? "Thanks coach but I'm not a receiver, I'm the quarterback." Later in the same chapter, Will's girlfriend turns on him for losing the game. I might have cared more but the relationship between the pair came off as shallow from the beginning.

I like the premise, I could probably come to like most of the characters but everything will accomplishes feels completley unearned. I don't think I'll be continuing this series.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Firstborn

  • The House War, Book 7
  • By: Michelle West
  • Narrated by: Eva Wilhelm
  • Length: 27 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Jewel ATerafin has never wanted to be a power, but to protect what she built, to protect what she values above all else, she has accepted that power is necessary. But with power comes responsibility. Jewel has forced herself to do what would have once been unthinkable: She has surrendered her den-kin, Carver, to the wilderness, because she must if she is to have any hope of saving the rest of her family, and the city in which they dwell. But she cannot leave him with nothing. Into his hands, she has placed the single, blue leaf that came from the wilderness and the dreaming combined.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • good story but wordy

  • By Christina Rich on 03-15-19

Visceral Stupid Silence

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

The three words of the title seem to be the author's favorites for this book. Our main character Jewel spends a lot of time viscerally feeling things, hearing "speaking silences" to her questions and, according to her cats, being "stupid". Jewel is not stupid. Jewel who once was a dynamic and engaging character in "The Hidden City", a character who had agency, has been transformed into a plot device.

One of the most irritating things is that Jewel -- and others -- mention events that occurred in the "The Sword" series. A series not on Audible. The issue becomes that Jewel has essentially remained the same. Yes she's gained titles, she gained some form of power but she's lost all agency. She does not act, she reacts. She is forever that orphaned child despite now being an adult, despite the fact that she's gained so much.

In Ms. West's desperate need to show just how "Stupid" Jewel -- and the the reader -- is, she has exceptionally characters speak in circles, vagueness and partiality. I'm not asking that Jewel be handed everything. I'm asking that if she asks a question we're given at least a semi-straight and complete answer occasionally. The author is so in love with this story telling style that she sucks what could be a tense situation dry of any tension, any believably. Instead of trying to desperately overcome a situation that apparently has killed gods int he past, Jewel and her party spend minutes (if not hours) discussing things that are only partially relevant to the situation. I'm being vague not to frustrate but in an effort not to spoil the scene because some might like it.

there's a point late in the book where Shadow finds Carver. This is frustrating because Shadow knows Jewel is looking for Carver. Instead of the author letting Shadow offer assistance in locating Carver, we spend endless pages of Jewel tramping around and being told how stupid and boring she is. At one time I found the cats interesting, now their just annoying. Especially because none of them work to help Jewel correct her stupidity.

I completely disapprove of Jarvin's plot line. Again I won't detail it to avoid spoil it for those that might enjoy it.

Oracle spent pages having the characters do nothing. This book spends pages having the characters -- slowly -- doing something that accomplishes nothing. I can't even find joy in the epilogue when I should.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Through Fiery Trials

  • Safehold, Book 10
  • By: David Weber
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 32 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 746
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 697
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 691

Those on the side of progressing humanity through advanced technology have finally triumphed over their oppressors. The unholy war between the small but mighty island realm of Charis and the radical, Luddite Church of God's Awaiting has come to an end. However, even though a provisional veil of peace has fallen over human colonies, the quiet will not last. For Safefold is a broken world, and as international alliances shift and Charis charges on with its precarious mission of global industrialization, the shifting plates of the new world order are bound to clash.   

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I miss Oliver Wyman

  • By Ofer on 01-12-19

What a horrible mess

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-19

Let's deal with the narrator. It's different then the last few books but Jonathan Davis makes every character sound either like Jack Nicholson or a texan... well almost any character. The major exception is any Harchong (aka Chinese) character. I don't know if the author "helped" the narrator with the pronunciations but it doesn't sound like that.

Now let's turn to the book itself. There's weird grammatical errors that really should have been caught -- for example how does one bobble a laugh? I don't know if this is because the author uses voice-to-text software or just sloppy editing.

There's sections where previous canon was ignored. For example Merlin spent the first nine books agonizing about how he dare not get too close to the temple in case he wakes something bad up. and yet in this book he wanders into the temple. If not worried then why couldn't he worry before? We're not told.

The bombardment system hasn't been taken care of, you would think that would be a priority now that the war is over but nope.

The pace of the book is fast, breezing over events could have emotional impact. Lots of telling, at least there was more showing in this book then in previous installments. It's clear the politics that we're leaving through are seeping into the book. I just don't know if the author is a trump supporter or not. It doesn't matter really but I read sci-fi (or are they calling this alternative fiction now?) for enjoyment. I slogged through nine books of the author's attack on the catholic church. I'm to really sure I want to slow through another nine about the author's politics.

There were some gems buried in the hay but I'm not sure I want to shift any more hay to find them. But as with other books there's lots and lots of characters but I'm really not sure which ones I should care about.

5 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Thunderhead

  • Arc of a Scythe
  • By: Neal Shusterman
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 13 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4,585
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,298
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,282

Rowan and Citra take opposite stances on the morality of the Scythedom, putting them at odds, in the chilling sequel to the Printz Honor Book Scythe from New York Times best seller Neal Shusterman, author of the Unwind dystology.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a roller coaster!!!

  • By Nathan on 01-15-18

What a borefest

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-18

This is sold as the sequel, where we follow the main characters from the last book. We don't really, at least not very much. Instead this book presents new characters and brings back characters the author killed off (which I find ironic given his death fetish).

I didn't care about Citra in the first book and the little we see of her in this one makes me care even less. I can't even say that she was a two-dimensional character. She just existed.

The ending was very disappointing and seemed to leave everything setup for a third book. I won't be picking that up if it does make an appearance.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Scythe

  • By: Neal Shusterman
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 10 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,009
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,498
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,493

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery: Humanity has conquered all those things and has even conquered death. Now Scythes are the only ones who can end life - and they are commanded to do so in order to keep the size of the population under control. Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe - a role that neither wants. These teens must master the "art" of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best book I have read this year.

  • By Jonathan Purcell on 10-15-17

A bad reprise of "Logan's Run" without Logan

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-18

I couldn't get immersed in the world, mainly because there were two Points of View. The second, and more annoying bit, was that the "villains" were almost cartoonish in there appearance and actions. Instead of sticking with one main character, and following their journey to becoming a Scythe, we get two and really I didn't care about either.

We don't spend enough time learning about the society naturally. Instead we're told it. And some of that society doesn't make a lot of sense. Where the great and wonderful AI solved all of mankind's problems, why do they have ruffians? It would make sense that there would be criminals but their motivations are not explained. There was a mention of a robot. If there's somuch over population why is there a robot? For that matter how are their small towns and villages still?

I don't think the author that things through more then what was necessary to get the ending he wanted.

After thinking on it a little more, I realized this was a form of "Logan's Run" without the driving narrative of the character Logan.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Sorcerer's Saga: Books 1-3

  • By: Rain Oxford
  • Narrated by: J. Scott Bennett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34

It’s not easy being the youngest of seven sons in a family of notorious sorcerers, especially for Ayden Dracre. In a world where sorcerers practice only dark magic and wizards practice only light magic, Ayden has a problem: He is very bad at being bad. Try as he might, all of his spells to cause mayhem go awry. When he finds out that his family has had enough of his mistakes, he decides to take destiny into his own hands.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Sorcerer's Saga

  • By Deedra on 01-15-19

Not much beyond the interesting premise

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-18

I'll admit the, very brief, Sarah Palin cameo made me laugh. The Donald Trump one just ruined the humor.

Having gotten that little bit out of the way, what can I say about this book? It's an interesting premise. Sadly the execution just doesn't deliver. I could like Ayden, except that through the first book he whines constantly. He also falls, sometimes literally, into the solutions for ever obstacle he faces.

The entire concept is that Ayden comes form an evil family and he needs to prove that he can be as evil as they are. The problem is, the author is unwilling to even let Ayden try... at all. Ayden's motivation for wanting to be evil is so that his mother wouldn't kill him. It's never really explained why Ayden just doesn't become a wizard. He's clearly suited for the role. He's even told that he has both "good" and "bad" magic.

I gave up after the first book. I might come back to read the next two but I'll have to be really bored to do so.

2 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Extreme Medical Services Box Set, Vol 1 - 3: Medical Care of the Fringes of Humanity

  • By: Jamie Davis
  • Narrated by: Roberto Scarlato
  • Length: 20 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

New paramedic Dean Flynn is fresh out of the academy. When he gets assigned to the unknown backwater ambulance Station U, he wonders what he did wrong. Then Dean learns that his patients aren't your normal 911 callers. Dean and his partner Brynne Garvey serve the creatures of myth and legend living alongside their normal human neighbors in Elk City. With patients that are vampires, werewolves, fairies and more, will Dean survive his first days on the new job? Will his patients? Not all is well on the streets of Elk City, and some humans are striking out at their mythical neighbors.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting angle on the paranormal.

  • By Mark on 12-23-18

Flat characters and very repetitive.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

I liked the premise and I was looking forward to a fun read. Dean, our main character is a cardboard cutout and boring. Gibby and Ashley who are secondary characters are much more fleshed out.

The author spends precious words repeating the same things again over and over and it doesn't advance or add to the plot. The "emergencies" might have been interesting but there's little emotion and what there is seems faked.

I don't know I'll continue reading after book three.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Lies Sleeping

  • Rivers of London, Book 7
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 899
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 841
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 837

The Faceless Man, wanted for multiple counts of murder, fraud, and crimes against humanity, has been unmasked and is on the run. Peter Grant, detective constable and apprentice wizard, now plays a key role in an unprecedented joint operation to bring him to justice. But even as the unwieldy might of the Metropolitan Police bears down on its foe, Peter uncovers clues that the Faceless Man, far from being finished, is executing the final stages of a long-term plan. A plan that has its roots in London's 2,000 bloody years of history and could literally bring the city to its knees. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A very satisfying read

  • By Tim on 11-21-18

What happened to Peter?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

Peter Grant used to have a flare. I found him a fun character to follow, watch as he struggled to be both a police officer and wizard. In the last few books that flare has died. While I will pick up the next book, I won't be anxiously waiting for it as I did after reading the first few books.

In this book Peter is, at least to me, boring. Even his encounters with Leslie are bland, especially the ending one. While Peter's magic seems to have progressed some his cousin Abigail seems ready to outpace him. One of the special things about Peter was that aside form Nightingale, he was really the only none-Fae who practiced magic. In this novel, Peter's rare abilities are handed out to other characters like candy.

I suspect part of the issue is that some of Peter's stories are told in Graphics Novels and these non-graphic novels rely on events that take place in the Graphic Novels. Since I cannot read the graphic novels I miss both context and am left wondering at things that are mentioned. For instance the Folly now sports both a BMW and a Firari. I don't why they are at the folly nor why they have the "most haunted car in Britain". I know this last comes form one of the series comic book story but again I rely on audiobooks so comic books take away form the story.

It's almost as if the author got bored so threw this book together to tie up most of the loose ends. I'm rapidly starting to not care about the characters. As I said before, I'll read the next book but I won't be hoping it comes out soon.

18 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Skyward

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Suzy Jackson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12,864
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,199
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12,183

From Brandon Sanderson, the number one New York Times best-selling author of the Reckoners series, Words of Radiance, and the internationally best-selling Mistborn series, comes the first book in an epic new series about a girl who dreams of becoming a pilot in a dangerous world at war for humanity's future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Has Sanderson been reading Craig Alanson???

  • By Barry on 11-18-18

Teenager SF

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

I hadn't realized this was categories as "Teen" by Audible until I was a few chapters into the book. Even as a "Teen" book, I found the writing to be geared more towards younger teens then older teens. On the positive side of things, there was no insta-love going on.

The story premise was interesting and there were a few original bits. The writing style just made the story drag. When I can skip most of a chapter and still understand what is happening, then I feel it's filler that adds nothing to the story. I guess my biggest issue was I wanted to care what happened to Spensa but I just couldn't. I can't put my finger on why though. She was the typical spunky tomboy who was going to show the world what she could do. I liked that part of her. I think it was her reactions to some events, they just didn't seem to fit with the personality.

1 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Ted and Ann

  • The Mystery of a Missing Child and Her Neighbor Ted Bundy
  • By: Rebecca Morris
  • Narrated by: Lee Ann Howlett
  • Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

Ted Bundy killed at least 35 girls and women, and possibly hundreds. Was his first victim eight-year-old Ann Marie Burr who disappeared from their Tacoma, Washington neighborhood in 1961? Her body was never found and there were no clues, just two tenacious detectives who spent the rest of their lives trying to solve the case.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Two stories intertwined

  • By Karen on 10-01-13

It's not really about Ted or Ann

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-18

This book tries to tie the disappearance and probably murder of Ann to Ted but it relies on speculation and coincidence to do so rather then fact and logic.

I had bought this book thinking it would lay out, in some coherent manner, how Ted came to abduct Ann, or at least detail the evidence. It didn't, instead it speculated, talked about other possible suspects, some who were much better suspects in my opinion. I think the author used the infamy of Ted Bundy coincidence to propel sales.

0 of 5 people found this review helpful