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Nathanial

ALBUQUERQUE, NM, USA
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 49
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  • The Map of Heaven

  • How Science, Religion, and Ordinary People Are Proving the Afterlife
  • By: Eben Alexander M.D.
  • Narrated by: Eben Alexander M.D.
  • Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 395
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 343
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340

The author of the number-one New York Times best seller Proof of Heaven teams up with the sages of times past, modern scientists, and with ordinary people who have had profound spiritual experiences to show the reality of heaven and our true identities as spiritual beings. When Proof of Heaven was published, some people contacted Dr. Eben Alexander to argue that his near death experience was impossible. But many more have written to say his story resonated with them in profound ways.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lovely sequel to Proof of Heaven and NDE studies

  • By Elan Sun Star on 10-07-14

A hopeful perspective - faith oriented.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-18

I'm pretty skeptical about this topic, but the author held my interest fairly thoroughly. I look at it as science fiction, or faith fiction. Apparently the brain contains or can synthesize DMT - perhaps the brain generates these amazing NDEs via a chemical synthesis. Regardless, the subjects in the book relate fascinating experiences, and, at times, I was quite compelled by the narrative. Other times the book was a bit slow. The faith/spiritual element of the book is unobtrusive, and will likely be very affirming for the religious reader/listener. What do I know? Try it for yourself.

  • The Secret History of the World

  • As Laid Down by the Secret Societies
  • By: Mark Booth
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 15 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 827
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 700
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 701

In this groundbreaking new work, Mark Booth embarks on an enthralling intellectual tour of our world's secret histories. Starting from a dangerous premise - that everything we've been taught about our world's past is corrupted, and that the stories put forward by the various cults and mystery schools throughout history are true - Booth produces nothing short of an alternate history of the past 3,000 years.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A unique perspective

  • By Robin on 04-09-12

Amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-17

Loved hearing about the blending of idealism and realism that has developed within human culture. This book revealed some new information, but most importantly, it revealed new perspectives and lenses to view human culture. I listen to it again and again. If it sounds interesting from the description and sample, trust that it is 100 times more compelling in its complete form. Highly recommended.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Half Has Never Been Told

  • Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
  • By: Edward E. Baptist
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 19 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,439
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,304
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,297

In The Half Has Never Been Told, historian Edward E. Baptist reveals the alarming extent to which slavery shaped our country politically, morally, and most of all, economically. Until the Civil War, our chief form of innovation was slavery. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from their slaves, giving the country a virtual monopoly on the production of cotton, a key raw material of the Industrial Revolution.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The most definitive history of American slavery;

  • By Robert Fullerton on 01-04-15

The Politics That Drove Slavery In America

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

A tragic subject viewed through the lens of early American politics. Excellent narration - a natural and pleasant cadence and tone.

The author has made this troubling subject worth reviewing by providing a view of the political rationale that made Slavery a nearly irresistible prospect for many early American entrepreneurs. The book takes a hard look at the Land of Liberty's insane contradictions during the years when Slavery was considered a reasonable endeavor by her political representatives. Pretty outrageous.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Not Taco Bell Material

  • By: Adam Carolla
  • Narrated by: Adam Carolla
  • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,657
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,499
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,496

Funnyman Adam Carolla is known for two things: hilarious rants about things that drive him crazy and personal stories about everything from his hardscrabble childhood to his slacker friends to the hypocrisy of Hollywood. He tackled rants in his first book, and now he tells his best stories and debuts some never-before-heard tales as well. Adam Carolla started broke and blue collar and has now been on the Hollywood scene for over 15 years. Yet he never lost his underdog demeanor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Adam's finest, with an elevating sophistication

  • By HappyQuails on 05-06-13

Very adolescent but somewhat enjoyable ...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-12

Any additional comments?

Corolla is barely talented enough to have a career beyond a management position at a "Hooters" restaurant. The material itself is very much like the material they use at "Taco Bell" that they call food - it's salty, cheesy, and momentarily satisfying, but ultimately something you could put directly in the toilet after unwrapping and be better off for doing so. Cheap thrills at times though. Great for dim witted males who are beginning to develop an intellect - its the tip of the iceberg boys, or maybe I should say it's the bottom of the barrel.

  • Opening the Door of Your Heart

  • And Other Buddhist Tales of Happiness
  • By: Ajahn Brahm
  • Narrated by: Francis Greenslade
  • Length: 5 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 502
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 412
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 407

During his wanderings and work over the last 30 years as a Buddhist monk, Ajahn Brahm has gathered many poignant, funny and profound stories. While traditional Buddhist philosophy is at the heart of this collection, these thoughtful stories are written like playful parables, which are used to launch into a deeper exploration of subjects such as mindfulness, suffering, forgiveness, hope, wisdom, and unconditional love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Listen and change your perspective

  • By Jo on 08-07-12

Opening the Door ... Challenging Misanthropy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-12

Where does Opening the Door of Your Heart rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This wonderful collection of parable-like stories, told through the lens of Buddhism, breaks the mold of somber self-help books. Ajahn Brahm is a witty man with a wonderful knack for making the simpleness of everyday life a profound reflection. The narrator made me feel as though Ajahn Brahm were reading the book, and the tone of his voice and accuracy of emotion made this an audio book I return to again and again. The book is inspirational and it is humorous, and it never dwells in pity or overly empathetic ruts that plague books of its kind.

What did you like best about this story?

One of the things I liked most about the book is that I was surprised to find a spiritually themed book that centers on finding ways to cope with life's challenges through love to be so irreverent and witty. I have read a few books filtered through the mindset of a Buddhist, and I have really liked many of those books, but this book made absolute sense without relying on spiritual metaphors. Very simple stories of cause and effect. The book never felt preachy or absolutist. By comparison a book like "The Four Agreements" seemed somber, overly empathetic, and easily misinterpreted by those seeking to validate their failings and shortcomings with a one track focus on the self. I love "The Four Agreements", but "Opening the Door of Your Heart" was far more practical, and inclusive of those closest to us, as a solution to the issues we all face together in life. "Me" and "I" must always be tempered with "we", "them" and "us", and to that end Ajahn Brahm does a stellar job.

Which scene was your favorite?

It's impossible for me to pick a favorite section of the book as I was able to glean lessons from each and every story presented. This book is as close to perfect for this genre that I have ever encountered.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

While there wasn't time to finish this book in one sitting, had there been time I would certainly have joyfully listened to the very end in one sitting.

Any additional comments?

This is a great book, and totally worth the credit or cost to acquire.

  • Destiny Disrupted

  • A History of the World through Islamic Eyes
  • By: Tamim Ansary
  • Narrated by: Tamim Ansary
  • Length: 17 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,415
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,174
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,166

Until about 1800, the West and the Islamic realm were like two adjacent, parallel universes, each assuming itself to be the center of the world while ignoring the other. As Europeans colonized the globe, the two world histories intersected and the Western narrative drove the other one under. The West hardly noticed, but the Islamic world found the encounter profoundly disrupting.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Explains the clash between Islam and the West

  • By Blake on 03-26-10

Great book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-10

If you can see past your ego, this is a great read/listen. If you are a hater of Muslims you will likely find this book difficult to endure. If you love world history, in all of its diversity, you might like this one. Interesting perspective.

  • Internal Combustion

  • By: Edwin Black
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 16 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 104
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40

Internal Combustion is the compelling tale of corruption and manipulation that subjected the U.S. and the world to an oil addiction that could have been avoided, that was never necessary, and that could be ended not in 10 years, not in five years, but today. Award-winning author Edwin Black has mined scores of corporate and government archives to assemble thousands of previously uncovered and long-forgotten documents and studies bearing on this dramatic story.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Abridge me please!

  • By R. Spangler on 09-12-08

Hard to hear the truth ...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-09

This book is accurate and in its accuracy it can be at times difficult to hear the truths presented. I can see how a lot of older readers/listeners can deny these truths at every turn; It's hard for me as a 40 year old to understand why as free citizens we systematically allowed corporate interests to monopolize our entire society over the last 100 years. The good ol' days indeed, hope you enjoyed em' guys!

This book is incredible. 10 stars if I could give them.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • A Voyage Long and Strange

  • By: Tony Horwitz
  • Narrated by: Tony Horwitz
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

On a chance visit to Plymouth Rock, Tony Horwitz makes an unsettling discovery. A history buff since early childhood, expensively educated at university - a history major, no less! - he's reached middle age with a third-grader's grasp of early America. In fact, he's mislaid more than a century of American history, the period separating Columbus' landing in 1492 from the arrival of English colonists at Jamestown in 160-something. Did nothing happen in between?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great read/listen

  • By Nathanial on 10-25-08

A great read/listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-08

This was an exceptionally compelling read/listen. A couple of years ago I read/listened to a book called "Lies my teacher told me ..." and while it was compelling I felt it was too personalized and reactionary from the authors perspective and sought to vilify any and all Europeans that forded the "new world". This book has similar content but the author leaves a lot to the reader to assess on their own regarding the historical first days of the American epoch. For me I was taken back to the roots of American culture both pre and post European "contact". The author has done a great job taking you down the paths of famous conquistadors and Native Americans ... it's very easy to conjure the struggle these brave men and women went through in fairly vivid detail. While this abridged version is thorough, it is not the "hard core" history some advanced historians may require to be completely convinced of the book's legitimacy. That being said, there are some gaps to be filled and references to follow up on to have a complete picture of the events outlined in this book. Over all I enjoyed every moment of this book and was left wanting more stories of a truly "magical" time in history.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful