LISTENER

Jeffrey

Herndon, Virginia, United States
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 16
  • ratings
  • Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter

  • By: Ben Goldfarb
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 59

In Eager, environmental journalist Ben Goldfarb reveals that our modern idea of what a healthy landscape looks like and how it functions is wrong, distorted by the fur trade that once trapped out millions of beavers from North America's lakes and rivers. The consequences of losing beavers were profound: streams eroded, wetlands dried up, and species from salmon to swans lost vital habitat. Today, a growing coalition of "Beaver Believers" recognizes that ecosystems with beavers are far healthier, for humans and non-humans alike, than those without them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fine natural history and great listen

  • By Theo Smith on 12-30-18

Beavers are awesome

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-19

Beavers, as this book shows, are critical for restoring our environment. However I will say that although this book gives great details and interviews to support that, one thing I thought was completely lacking was the discussion of the mosquito. I understand the dragonflies eat mosquitoes in that beaver ponds are great places to produce dragonflies, but it seems to me that if we have all these ponds we would have all these mosquitoes breeding in them, more than any dragonfly swarm could consume and this more than anything is what I worry about with a castorid take over. However, I really liked the discussion of the two beaver species, especially the brief discussion of recovery in Eurasia, and all the great trials and tribulations of restoring them in the New World. My only other net would be that the chapters are far too long in the audible edition. Are usually listen to the book and 20 minute chunks on my daily commute, and it’s very frustrating to have to take two days to finish a chapter. But of course, overall I quite enjoyed it and that’s why I give it five stars.

  • Fight Club

  • By: Chuck Palahniuk
  • Narrated by: Jim Colby
  • Length: 5 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,500
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,648
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,662

When a listless office employee (the narrator) meets Tyler Durden, his life begins to take on a strange new dimension. Together they form Fight Club - a secretive underground group sponsoring bloody bare-knuckle boxing matches staged in seedy alleys, vacant warehouses, and dive-bar basements. Fight Club lets ordinary men vent their suppressed rage, and it quickly develops a fanatical following.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not bad...

  • By Nate_D on 04-11-14

Delightfully dark!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-19

A friend of mine said she read this book and I kept thinking I’m vaguely familiar with this, I remember when the movie came out. So I have a little downtime from my nonfiction reading and said, I think I’ll check it out. I was not disappointed. Although I think the ending could’ve had a bit more punch, I think the entire narrative was engaging throughout it honestly, I can even forget the ending it not perfect because it’s darn near close.

  • How Not to Be Wrong

  • The Power of Mathematical Thinking
  • By: Jordan Ellenberg
  • Narrated by: Jordan Ellenberg
  • Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,147
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 965
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 960

Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia's views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can't figure out about you, and the existence of God.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great book but better in writing

  • By Michael on 07-02-14

A great way to understand our modern times

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-18

This book was quite enlightening. I was very happy to see the 1:20 or 5% tolerance for significant results discussed and the discussion of elections and their problems of not being able to come up with a solution satisfying even a plurality. What with 1888 and 2016 joining the mentioned 2000 election, it’s of course natural I have for years been lobbying for the adoption of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. Overall, I learned something new and in my book that is the sign of success!

  • Come as You Are

  • The Surprising New Science That Will Transform Your Sex Life
  • By: Emily Nagoski
  • Narrated by: Emily Nagoski
  • Length: 11 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,865
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,686
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,651

An essential exploration of why and how women's sexuality works - based on groundbreaking research and brain science - that will radically transform your sex life into one filled with confidence and joy. Researchers have spent the last decade trying to develop a "pink pill" for women to function like Viagra does for men. So where is it? Well, for reasons this book makes crystal clear, that pill will never exist - but as a result of the research that's gone into it, scientists in the last few years have learned more about how women's sexuality works than we ever thought possible.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Positive, Encouraging, Exciting

  • By Kendra Holliday on 01-31-16

A must-read book for anyone who's a member of the human race

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-15

This book covers so much and you can learn a tremendous amount from it. Learn how we are all the same, and yet all unique, made up of the same parts, with accelerators and brakes, who need the proper context and may be sexually concordat and how in the end we're all normal, we're all wonderful!

4 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of the Human Body

  • Evolution, Health, and Disease
  • By: Daniel Lieberman
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 14 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 998
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 871
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 875

In this landmark book of popular science, Daniel E. Lieberman - chair of the department of human evolutionary biology at Harvard University and a leader in the field - gives us a lucid and engaging account of how the human body evolved over millions of years, even as it shows how the increasing disparity between the jumble of adaptations in our Stone Age bodies and advancements in the modern world is occasioning this paradox: greater longevity but increased chronic disease.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truly worthwhile read

  • By Jennifer on 05-02-14

It may scare you into changing your life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-15

My only not is how the reader pronounces high-fructose corn syrup as High Fruk'-toes corn syrup. Also, better to listen while walking through the forest, eating an apple. Do what Lieberman says: take care of your body!

  • The Violinist's Thumb

  • And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code
  • By: Sam Kean
  • Narrated by: Henry Leyva
  • Length: 12 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 726
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 622
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 627

From New York Times best-selling author Sam Kean come more incredible stories of science, history, language, and music, as told by our own DNA. There are genes to explain crazy cat ladies, why other people have no fingerprints, and why some people survive nuclear bombs. Genes illuminate everything from JFK's bronze skin (it wasn't a tan) to Einstein's genius. They prove that Neanderthals and humans bred thousands of years more recently than any of us would feel comfortable thinking.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So much to think about!

  • By Traci on 08-18-12

No option to hear the notes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-13

Where does The Violinist's Thumb rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This book's included contents is very good with the exception that it is abridged as the notes for this book were rather informative and their excise was a great loss.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Paul Kammerer

Which scene was your favorite?

Epigenetics

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Too long for that, but yeah, it'd have been nice.

Any additional comments?

I never had time to read the notes so I feel I missed something.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Rabid

  • A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus
  • By: Bill Wasik, Monica Murphy
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller
  • Length: 8 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,312
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,170
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,174

The most fatal virus known to science, rabies kills nearly 100 percent of its victims once the infection takes root in the brain. From Greek myths to zombie flicks, from the laboratory heroics of Louis Pasteur to the contemporary search for a lifesaving treatment, Rabid is a fresh, fascinating, and often wildly entertaining look at one of mankind’s oldest and most fearsome foes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favorite science read this year.

  • By Sparkly on 10-06-12

You definitely come away learning something new.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-13

Would you consider the audio edition of Rabid to be better than the print version?

The audio version was sufficient to learning the books material though I've yet to check the e-book for illustrations.

What other book might you compare Rabid to and why?

The Violinst's Thumb

Which scene was your favorite?

Using Rabies as a retrovirus that can cross the blood-brain barrier to cure disease was number to but the Milwaukee Protocol was definitely the best part!

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No, but in as quick a time frame as possible.

Any additional comments?

Great book for my book club.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful