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PearlyBaker

Overland Park, KS
  • 41
  • reviews
  • 41
  • helpful votes
  • 53
  • ratings
  • The Outsider

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,078
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,007

An 11-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City's most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Capturing story, but it got a bit silly

  • By flywatt on 07-03-18

50 Years Upon My Head to Have You Call Me Child

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-18

I cannot think of an author in the history of all mankind who has written characters as well as Stephen K. The story, plot, theme, everything else practically matters not. For instance, who didn't start saying "cluster mug" after reading The Dome? Do you know one soul who did not accidentally drop a "Thankee Sai" after reading the Dark Tower? Can you honestly tell me you know a Stephen King reader who has not asked you to, "Pull up a rock and have a little palaver?" Anywho, the plot might could have been pedantic, predictable and plastic, but I wouldn't know because I don't pay attention to that. I'm way more intrigued how he can write a human being so real it's as if they are old friends.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Boy on the Bridge

  • By: M. R. Carey
  • Narrated by: Finty Williams
  • Length: 13 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,405
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,254

Once upon a time, in a land blighted by terror, there was a very clever boy. The people thought the boy could save them, so they opened their gates and sent him out into the world. To where the monsters lived.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Bridge Worth Crossing

  • By John on 05-23-17

Meet You At The Jubilee

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-18

My six year cowgirl asked me if I knew what was right before depression? Like not sad but almost sad? Yes, dysthymia. I know it all too well. I know I said this about the last book so I'm starting to believe it really is me. I'm pretty sure I started reading this book nine months ago. So I'm going to allow for a rough year, some chronic pain that makes it difficult to concentrate, I fall asleep now when I'm reading, and I have more sick and/or dying friends. Lost one of the good ones last week. Viper is what his soldiers knew him as. He was what Kris Kristofferson would call a True Heavy. We shared books, philosophy, music, dance, heritage, home town, and lust for life. Sure we gripped it and ripped it; for a spell tearing every bit of fun, life, laughter, meaning and song out of each day. Some of my best stories would not have happened without him. He was my band MonkeyDust. He was crucial in the sombrero story of '97, the pharmacy 0f '98, some vision quests to Arkansas and many more I cannot even mention. I We might could have reached for the secret too soon and may have believed in the magic less as the years progressed, isolated more, sung, wrote and danced (in public) less but you can never truly kill the spirit of a true warrior. I believe Kris needs to add our names to the beginning of Pilgrim Chapter 33... "You see him wasted on the sidewalk with his jacket and his jeans wearing yesterdays misfortunes like a smile...He's a poet, he's a picker
He's a prophet, he's a pusher, He's a pilgrim and a preacher, and a problem when he's stoned
He's a walkin' contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction,
Takin' ev'ry wrong direction on his lonely way back home...He has tasted good and evil in your bedrooms and your bars, And he's traded in tomorrow for todayRunnin' from his devils, lord, and reachin' for the stars, And losin' all he's loved along the way. But if this world keeps right on turnin' for the better or the worse,and all he ever gets is older and around
from the rockin' of the cradle to the rollin' of the hearse, The goin' up was worth the comin' down."
Mayhap things will settle down for a spell and this new King book will turn things around for me. My queue is becoming unsustainable again and Lord knows I'm way more hay than grass these days so I better go tend to my heirloom apple trees and blackberry bushes, pick mulberries for my preserves and chop down a tree or two before I get started with my day.

  • Righteous

  • By: Joe Ide
  • Narrated by: Sullivan Jones
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,476
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,376
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,373

For 10 years something has gnawed at Isaiah Quintabe's gut and kept him up nights, boiling with anger and thoughts of revenge. Ten years ago, when Isaiah was just a boy, his brother was killed by an unknown assailant. The search for the killer sent Isaiah plunging into despair and nearly destroyed his life. Even with a flourishing career, a new dog, and near-iconic status as a PI in his hometown, East Long Beach, he has to begin the hunt again - or lose his mind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Joe Ide can write!

  • By 6catz on 10-20-17

Went to See the Captain Strangest I Could Find

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

He writes like an Asian Irvine Welsh mixed with Jacqueline Woodson and Quentin Tarantino. Alright I should probably know more Asian authors but I tried reading Haruki Murakami but I don’t think I’m smart enough. My friend Mimo’s grandfather was a famous Japanese sci fi author but I don’t think they ever translated his work. I do have a bolo tie from his collection though which is noice. Anywho sorry for that trip to Branson: A story that takes a long time to get to the point and when you do get there you find out IT SUCKS! His books are great and I was sure he was a brother or at least 1/256th black like me when I read his first piece.

  • The Power

  • By: Naomi Alderman
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh
  • Length: 12 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,512
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,315
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,309

In The Power, the world is a recognizable place: There's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power - they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A necessary read

  • By Grace on 11-22-17

Lacking In Some Direction

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-18

I guess it just came out okay for me. Maybe it was weird time in my life. A transition period where my mind was flying 1000 different ways at once with ageing friends facing chronic illness, biotoxins, chronic pain or autoimmune disorders. Or maybe, like my break-up excuses, it really wasn't me but the fault of the book (ie girlfriend) and I'm just trying to soften the blow on the author because I don't want to hurt their feelings and certainly don't want, as a constant reader them to ever, ever, ever stop writing. I don't know. It's a tough call but Obama liked this one I'll take his word since he and I were about the only two people I knew who didn't believe Colin Powell's fear tactics on weaponized media that included NBC, Fox News and NPR with the nightly sound bite, "What if the next terror attack is a mushroom cloud in New York City?" So I'm going to say it really was me baby, and this book was awesome.

  • Truthers

  • By: Geoffrey Girard
  • Narrated by: Rachel Frawley
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

Katie Wallace has never given much thought to 9/11. She was only a year old when terrorists struck American soil. But now her dad has landed in a mental institution after claiming to know what really happened. He insists the attacks were part of a government conspiracy. And he claims that Katie is living proof: the lone survivor of a massive cover-up. Hoping to free her dad, Katie sets out to investigate his bizarre claims. Soon she's drawn into the strange and secretive world of 9/11 conspiracy theorists known as the Truthers.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Terrific

  • By Theresa on 09-25-17

I Could Not Caution All, I still Might Warn a Few

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-18

A colleague suggested Among the Truthers but this was all I could find which turned out to be pretty good fiction though I'd call it historical fiction myself. I don't like labels and believe the pejorative term truther and conspiracy theorist are used to marginalize those of us not gullible enough to believe the fairy tale told by the US governement. This includes an Orwellian array of lies like the black box and all other evidence at the Twin Towers (which were quickly whisked to China for recycling with strong reproach from the FBI) were incinerated. However there was this perfect, pristine, paper, passport found amongst the rubble identifying a Saudi terrorist so we invaded Afghanistan, formed the Department of Homeland Security and started a practice of pre-emptive strike. Funny Adolf did the exact same thing when he burned the Reichstag, blamed it on Communist terrorists, formed the Division of Fatherland Security and invaded Poland. So set aside the fairy tale verson of 9/11 for a moment if you please. We can all agree now that Colin Powell's Global Tour using precision speeches about yellah cake was completely false and led us into a war that was fully uneccesary. I am now convinced W. and Trump got together to write the 9/11 Commission Report just to see how gullible the populace is. So gullible it seems that Trump went ahead and held a summit yesterday blaming mass shootings not on the reality of the US military waffle stomping women and children's brains in since the 16th century, but on video games. It's funny you never hear the Killer Clintons admit that Wild Bill's mass shooting of cruise missiles killed Layla Al-Attar in Baghdad. How about Obama's Drone Strikes Bro? Anyone get a total on the collateral damage there? Or that W.'s useless wars kill more children in schools annually than have been killed in every mass
shooting in American schools combined since Austin, 1964. I just think maybe, reality might have more of an effect on folks that aren't blinded by the lies this government spreads then fictitious augmented reality. One last thought, if Black Lives Matter and we can't trust these fools not to shoot our brothers in the back for resisting arrest, then why in the world would we be willing to give these same fools all the guns? I propose an immediate ban on all assault weapons for the US Military and only a few defensive installations at home. If not that then I propose background checks on all politicians with a drug screen before they deploy any weapons with what Roger Waters calls the "Bravery of Being out of Range." Then I believe politicians should be treated like citizens even if they only murder brown fabricated enemies with fabricated evidence I think Clinton and W. should go on trial for murder stat. Like I always say if you shoot up a school you're demented and evil, if you destroy a country you're a hero and if you slow-kill the planet's body and soul making addictive augmented reality rectangles in China with loose pollution and child labor laws then you're a God. So if we must place the blame on people nuttin up like Michael Douglas in Falling Down (which by the way I understood much more as an adult) then sports fans we must look in the mirror. We personally fund murderers with campaign contributions and taxes. I have yet to pay for any mass shooter's weapons. Once agian I'll draw on Roger Waters who is way more eloquent than I, "We watched the tragedy unfold, we did as we were told, we bought and sold."

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Manhattan Beach

  • A Novel
  • By: Jennifer Egan
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Heather Lind, Vincent Piazza
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,208
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,947
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,936

Anna Kerrigan, nearly 12 years old, accompanies her father to the house of a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. Anna observes the uniformed servants, the lavishing of toys on the children, and some secret pact between her father and Dexter Styles. Years later her father has disappeared, and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that had always belonged to men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Narrative of a Girl Diver

  • By WillowGirl313 on 10-30-17

While My Conscience Explodes

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-18

I have never been too concerned about an Ai apocalypse because usually their algorithms suggest books or products I litcherally just bought and reviewed. Once I made fun of Joseph Smith's number one occupation: stealing women from other men or as he euphemistically called it "celestial visitations" so she suggested I read the Book of Mormon and Pearl of Great Price...again. I'm not sure why I have such a strong affinity for the 70's when most of it was spent listening to latter day saint's cry into a hot mike while I "fasted" which led to Latter Day Beatings because I'd take 7 pieces of Wonder Bread from the communion plate. Look I was starving plus it was four hours into a lecture about Jesus visiting the Inca Jews so I pretended the spongy, white squares were poison pills that would take me away from this Russian torture chamber. But I digress. The point is that some algorithm suggested Egan for me. I'm two novels in and I love her. The Ai finally got it right, which means she's evolving so I'm restarting my training regimen for the Ai apocalypse stat. I'll start with cardio tomorrow and then Monday I will titrate iPhone usage to 30 times per hour while increasing paper novel usage. This old sailor is going to be fit and fully detoxed in no time.

  • The Death of Sweet Mister

  • A Novel
  • By: Daniel Woodrell, Dennis Lehane (foreward)
  • Narrated by: Nicholas Tecosky
  • Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 43

Shug Akins is a lonely, overweight 13-year-old boy. His mother, Glenda, is the one person who loves him - she calls him Sweet Mister and attempts to boost his confidence and give him hope for his future. Shuggie's purported father, Red, is a brutal man with a short fuse who mocks and despises the boy. Into this small-town Ozarks mix comes Jimmy Vin Pearce, with his shiny green T-bird and his smart city clothes. When he and Glenda begin a torrid affair, a series of violent events is inevitably set in motion. The outcome will break your heart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Call Me a Whining Boy if You Wil

  • By PearlyBaker on 11-25-17

Call Me a Whining Boy if You Wil

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-17

My six year old cowgirl Betty is one of the most interesting people I've yet to come across. Unlike most humans she actually knows how to communicate. She asks open ended questions and listens to the answers, is genuinely curious and remembers your answers forever. She befriends older folks but isn't the best with non-equestrian civilians. While moving out to our place in the country her and I call Turquoise Ranch, she’s befriended these old barrel racing champions who now let her ride their pony and want to see her more than most of our kin. I like to muck their stalls while Betty rides but the last time I was over her 90 year old Cherokee grandmother showed up too. We had an interaction unlike any I've had before. She is the first person to just unabashedly grab my hand and stare at my admittedly dank Navajo rings and did not speak for what felt like an hour but reckon was only 3 minutes. This is till awkward to most humans but felt as natural as a 1977 Morning Dew to me. Finally I spoke up when I realized someone should. Words then came out of my mouth that never have before. I asked, "So how's your life been so far?" She simply looked up at me and said, "Hell." I retorted with, "Same" and we became fast friends. I asked her name and she said with a wry little grin, "Six Killer." Seeing as how a gentleman doesn't ask and a lady never tells I just said, "They obviously had it coming." There might could be a few less Weinsteins in the world if we had a few more Six Killers around. I remember one time when Betty was younger she asked me, "So what happened to your parent's relationship?" Since no adult had ever asked me that I had no idea how to tell a five year old that the grandmother she unfortunately never got to meet moved to LA in the 80’s to be near her boyfriend's prison. I can't recollect who wrote the forward to this but he was right saying that until and unless someone else comes around Woodrell owns the Ozarks. His fiction is almost as weird as my non-fiction. However when I finally stop moving, mowing, mucking stalls, reading, writing reviews and long descriptions for priceless pieces I'm selling on eBay and Etsy and have to actually think, my mind now drifts to this very disturbing scene of Betty in ICU. It’s then I tend to cry myself into a nap.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • All Over But the Shoutin'

  • By: Rick Bragg
  • Narrated by: Rick Bragg
  • Length: 2 hrs and 42 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 354
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 306
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 306

This haunting, harrowing, gloriously moving recollection of a life on the American margin is the story of Rick Bragg, who grew up dirt-poor in northeastern Alabama, seemingly destined for either the cotton mills or the penitentiary, and instead became a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times. It is the story of Bragg's father, a hard-drinking man with a murderous temper and the habit of running out on the people who needed him most.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • ABRIDGED

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-17-16

Never been so lonesome and a long way from home

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-12-17

My first date with Lisa Tripi back in 89 was to see Steel Magnolias. It had to be her worst as I reckon I cried for eight hours after that scene in the cemetery. Seems I go decades without crying then it all sort of comes at once. This time is different though. As good as these southern boys write I ain’t never witnessed nothin as lonesome sad and such a long way from right as a child preparing for a surgery meant for a 70 year-old Camel smoking junky. I haven’t stopped crying for months. This makes me terrible glad to live in the country now so as I listen to these good old boys write like a modern day Samuel Clemens while I'm walking the hounds, no one sees tears. After all I️ have a rep to protect.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Long Time Leaving

  • Dispatches from Up South (Unabridged Selections)
  • By: Roy Blount Jr.
  • Narrated by: Roy Blount Jr.
  • Length: 7 hrs and 58 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

Here's a sly, dry, hilarious collection of essays, his first in more than 10 years, from the writer who, according to The New York Times Book Review, is "in serious contention for the title of America's most cherished humorist". This time Blount focuses on his own dueling loyalties across the great American divide, North vs. South.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Insanely funny

  • By Steve Durfee on 09-09-07

His Friends Were Getting Most Concerned

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-17

I'll allow that I might could read, work, eat, sleep, sell on eBay, scrutinize Garcia lyrics, walk the dogs, micro-farm, write and do most things a site too much. But there is nary enough time in life to drink in the pure truth that Mr. Blount offers. It's like Ken Kesey said during Dark Star on 10/31/91, "Nobody else reaches across the distance and puts their hand on your shoulder and talks to you about this S. That's what the Dead have been doing for a long time, reaching across. When you guys played Broken Down Palace at that gig, I knew, S, this is the Grateful Dead telling me about my son. It's a big a time as it gets. And old Bill knew it, you know he knew it." I work with a young man who has a symptom I am quite fond of and wish more people had called alogia. One time a judge asked him why he never talks. He thought for a moment, looked sideways at the judge and then mumbled, "Because mostly what people say is *bullshot*" (Amazon will sell you books entitled 12 inches: A Secret Baby Dark Romance; however they will not allow reviews to have naughty words in them). Thankfully there are still a few real people left who are reaching across.

  • Origin

  • A Novel
  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,497
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,576
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31,487

In keeping with his trademark style, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and Inferno, interweaves codes, science, religion, history, art, and architecture in this new novel. Origin thrusts Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon into the dangerous intersection of humankind's two most enduring questions - and the earthshaking discovery that will answer them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Formula over fiction

  • By Evan M Carlson on 11-01-17

We used to Play for Silver, now we play for LIfe

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-17

Remember when Arthur Fonzarelli jumped over a shark tank on his motorcycle? My ex-wives are more interesting than this sort of contractually obligated, time wasting, unoriginal balderdash. The reality TV star/commander in Chief has more depth than this piece. Speaking of the end of the world as we know it. This story was better the first time when it was called Robopocalypse. Pardon my French but what the fish was that? I'm so fishing angry right now that I broke my own policy regarding spoilers in reviews. Dan Brown, you can take your royalty check and shove it up your jacksie because you sir are dead to me now.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful