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Bassam

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  • 19
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  • 215
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  • The Long March

  • The True History of Communist China's Founding Myth
  • By: Sun Shuyun
  • Narrated by: Laural Merlington
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

The Long March is Communist China's founding myth, the heroic tale that every Chinese child learns in school. Seventy years after the historical march took place, Sun Shuyun set out to retrace the Marchers' steps and unexpectedly discovered the true history behind the legend. The Long March is the stunning narrative of her extraordinary expedition.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting book - Inexcusable Audio Version

  • By David on 11-11-07

Awfull

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-17

Awful, Bad, Boring, Terrible, Waste, Terrible, Miserable, Noise, Ridiculous, Terrible, Forgetful, Restless, Stupid, Awful, Why, ...

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Man Who Knew Infinity

  • A Life of the Genius Ramanujan
  • By: Robert Kanigel
  • Narrated by: Humphrey Bower
  • Length: 17 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 183
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182

In 1913, a young, unschooled Indian clerk wrote a letter to G. H. Hardy, begging that preeminent English mathematician's opinion on several ideas he had about numbers. Hardy, realizing the letter was the work of a genius, arranged for Srinivasa Ramanujan to come to England. Thus began one of the most remarkable collaborations ever chronicled.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thorough and Enjoyable

  • By Roger on 05-23-08

Could have been better...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

This story could have been written better. I found the book to be confused about what to say as the author would deviate off topic in so many chapters. The ending is very depressing and you cannot avoid feeling sad for characters that achieved so much.

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,858
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,632
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,647

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

Fluff

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-16

Not good book overall:
1/3 relies on "sacred" book of the Khan's history that reads like the bible.
1/3 (the interesting part) relies on entries from 13-14 century Persian and Christian historians that carries what everyone thinks they know about the people.
1/3 (later parts) relies on the author's judgement that the source of the modern world can be traced to the Mongols?????

I had to quit listening when the author began spending time explaining how 20th century asian people began viewing Genghis as a hero....it looks like the author is trying too hard.

I wish I can get my 1 credit back.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stress Test

  • Reflections on Financial Crises
  • By: Timothy F. Geithner
  • Narrated by: Timothy F. Geithner
  • Length: 18 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,007
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 868
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 862

On January 26, 2009, during the depth of the financial crisis and having just completed five years as President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Timothy F. Geithner was sworn in by President Barack Obama as the 75th Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. Now, in a strikingly candid, riveting, and historically illuminating memoir, Geithner takes listeners behind the scenes during the darkest moments of the crisis.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Credible analysis of the 2008 crisis

  • By Neuron on 09-02-15

Not as good as I thought it would be

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-15

By the third chapter, I decided to quit listening to Mr. Geithner's disillusioned views of how the world works. Something is missing here. It is hard to consolidate the two views he presents. On the one hand he always projects a self image of someone who is not interested in economics, finance, or politics while at the same time lays out a narrative of how he kept rising in the cadre of government bureaucrats. Difficult to make an honest image of who exactly is Timothy Geithner.... At least you get the chance to hear a former Treasury secretary curse!!!

  • House of Cards

  • A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street
  • By: William Cohan
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 25 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 464
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 205
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 207

In March 2008, Bear Stearns, a swashbuckling 84-year-old financial institution, was forced to sell itself to JPMorgan Chase for an outrageously low price in a deal brokered by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, who was desperately trying to prevent the impending catastrophic market crash. But mere months before, an industry-wide boom had "the Bear" clocking a record high stock price. How did a giant investment bank with $18 billion in cash on hand disappear in a mere 10 days?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not "Hubris and Wretched Excess"

  • By Augustus T. White on 06-20-09

Another superb product from the Master

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-14

Yet another great product from the master of current Wall Street biographer/historian. Mr. Cohan never fails to make the absurd and menial sound so entertaining and absorbing. This one topped the Lazzard saga. I resolved to buying a print edition for keep. Mr. Sklar is absolutely superb in his tone and delivery. I can see Jimmi and Ace talking directly to me. Can't wait for the next one.

  • Rough Justice

  • The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer
  • By: Peter Elkind
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 12 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

With a combination of talent, hard work, connections, and family wealth, Eliot Spitzer built an amazing career. By his late 40s, he'd gone from Princeton to Harvard Law to dramatic success as a prosecutor and attorney general to the governorship of New York. Many thought he would become the first Jewish president of the United States. Then came the prostitution scandal that shocked and mystified the nation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Smart People Do Dumb Things

  • By IndyMcDuff on 07-28-17

Should be called "Why I Love Spitzer"

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-13

If you were/are in love with Spitzer, you would love the book. If you didn't care for Spitzer or you hated the guy and wanted to get inside Spitzer's brain, you will be disappointed and disgusted. The book is written by a Spitzer friend and admirer. I am half way through the book and yet to hear anything "disturbing" about the psyche of Spitzer. I decided I had enough. When I got the book, I thought I would get insight into the mindset of a hard-driven yet guilt-seeking personality, instead, I got someone telling me how Spitzer is great. Gave up and deleted the book. I wish I can get my 2 credits back. Bad book.

  • My Life as a Quant

  • Reflections on Physics and Finance
  • By: Emanuel Derman
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 218
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 169
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 172

In My Life as a Quant, Emanuel Derman relives his exciting journey as one of the first high-energy particle physicists to migrate to Wall Street. Derman details his adventures in this fieldanalyzing the incompatible personas of traders and quants, and discussing the dissimilar nature of knowledge in physics and finance. Throughout this tale, he also reflects on the appropriate way to apply the refined methods of physics to the hurly-burly world of markets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly Enjoyed It

  • By Justin on 02-16-11

Great story, what a life?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-12

Fantastic narrative that takes you from the world of physics in the 1970s and ends in the world of finance and risk management in the 1990s. I enjoyed the audio so much that I went ahead and bought a paper copy to capture all the details (physics and finance).

  • My Inventions

  • The Autobiography of Nikola Tesla
  • By: Nikola Tesla
  • Narrated by: David Mitchell
  • Length: 3 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 114
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 115

Written in his early 60s, Tesla looks back on the events that shaped his life as the inventor of our modern world. Like many exceptional artists, scientists, and engineers, Tesla's senses and intellect worked on a higher level, which often afflicted him physically. Yet, he overcame, and used his special abilities and strong educational background to make electricity the servant of man.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very interesting

  • By Peter on 01-05-10

Really bad performance. Puts you to sleep

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-11

Could not judge the story itself as the performance was a real sleeper. It appears that the Mr. Mitchell was transported through a time-machine from Tesla's own time. A real sleeper.

0 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Quants

  • How a New Breed of Math Whizzes Conquered Wall Street and Nearly Destroyed It
  • By: Scott Patterson
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 864
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 556
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 555

In March 2006, the world's richest men sipped champagne in an opulent New York hotel. They were preparing to compete in a poker tournament with ­million-dollar stakes. At the card table that night was Peter Muller, who managed a fabulously successful hedge fund called PDT. With him was Ken Griffin, who was the tough-as-nails head of Citadel Investment Group. There, too, were Cliff Asness, the founder of the hedge fund AQR Capital Management, and Boaz Weinstein, king of the credit-default swap.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • perhaps the best book on the Quants

  • By D. Littman on 04-14-10

Very Kitsch... fascinating for simpletons

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-10

I was very disappointed with this title. I have been seeing the ad in the WSJ for a while now and was convinced to get the title after reading Taleb's comment. I was very disappointed in the content, though. Very simple and idiotic narration with names thrown left and right in order to attempt and impress the reader/listener. The author, like many in today's publishing world, try and connect nobody's to great events and names in history for no apparent reason except to impress (why is it important to know that an investor's father fought in World War I????). I am very disappointed in this selection and will avoid the author from now on. The narrator makes the selection even worse. Mr. Chamberlain should find another line of career. His delivery is bad and makes you think of a snob telling a boring story in some fancy golf club.

0 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Power Failure

  • The Inside Story of the Collapse of Enron
  • By: MiMi Swartz, Sherron Watkins
  • Narrated by: Karen White
  • Length: 16 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 27

From inside the walls of Enron, a lone whistleblower attempted to avert the course of events leading to the largest bankruptcy in American history. On August 16, 2001, Sherron Watkins wrote an anonymous letter to Enron's Chairman, Ken Lay, laying out problems with Enron's use of partnerships to hide debt. She warned of a possible scandal that could topple the company if investors and the news media learned of the operations. Then, she revealed her identity and confronted Lay directly.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Truly Compelling Look at Greed and Arrogance

  • By Kevin Christy on 08-10-04

Good book, narator is a bit annoying

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-10

I didn't mind the material. The narrator is a bit over the top. It would have been much better if the narrator did not show so much emotions in reacting to narrative. This book is much better than the anti-Bush alternative (The Smartest Guys in the Room).

2 of 3 people found this review helpful