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Ivy Moore

  • 46
  • reviews
  • 47
  • helpful votes
  • 68
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  • The Electric

  • By: Andrew David Barker
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

In the summer of 1985, 15-year-old Sam Crowhurst discovers an old, abandoned cinema that screens movies made by ghosts, for ghosts. Sam and his friends Emma and David find themselves drawn into a world where the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Lon Chaney, and Theda Bara are still making pictures, where Harold Lloyd and John Belushi team up for roustabout comedies, and Karloff and Lugosi appear in films scripted by Edgar Allan Poe. Sam comes to learn the mysteries of the Electric cinema and his part to play in its long and strange history. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • just wow

  • By Ivy Moore on 01-28-19

just wow

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-19

I really loved this audiobook. I had to stay up all night to finish this that's how good it was. This is a reading with sound effects and atmospheric music and it really drew me in. At four am, I was making coffee so I could continue to stay up.

Writing: You may think Andrew Davide Barker's writing style is a bit meandering but this book is a reminiscence and memories are rarely a straight timeline. When we think back, we remember odd bits that may not have much to do with the main plot of our life. Stick with it if you are finding it a bit slow at first.

In this book, there is a lot of history dealing with films but it's not dry, it's woven very well into the story. Barker writes about the feelings that movies can create in us. Those feelings that make you believe in magic, make you believe in that world that exists in imaginations but is often more real than what goes on around us. It's such an indescribable feeling but Barker catches that feeling with this book.

Narration: I can't imagine the work that must go into a production such as this. That being said, wow. This performance was amazing. Nigel Peever has SUCH a wonderful voice for narration, especially for nostalgic pieces. His voice captures bygone eras brilliantly. His accents and voices for Bogart, Chaney and others were done really well. I've heard so many Bogart impressions over the years and some of them are really over the top.

Production: Very, very well done. The sound effects really drew on my memories of going to the movies. The sound the projector makes, how the film sounds as it's going through the projector, the music from the era's the movies were set in. But it also captured that idea that these were movies made by ghosts, for ghosts.

I found myself wishing I had someone to talk to after this book was done. It's going to stick with me for awhile.

Brilliant writer, narrator and production.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Borderline Decision

  • Hap Stoner Series, Book 1
  • By: Hugh Simpson
  • Narrated by: Chris Ritchie
  • Length: 9 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

High-ranking US military commander Chuck Warden is taken hostage by the ruthless Black Stone Mexican drug cartel, who work hand in hand with a treacherous Middle Eastern terrorist group. Corrupt US officials turn a blind eye. But Lieutenant Colonel Hap "Kang" Stoner takes action, leading a gritty squadron of Marine aviators on an unauthorized raid into Mexico to bring Warden home.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • okay

  • By Ivy Moore on 01-23-19

okay

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-19

I really don't like writing bad reviews so I'm not happy right now. But I agreed to write an honest review for this book.

Writing:
I'm a big fan of action adventure audiobooks/books so I was disappointed with this book. There is a lot of action which I loved but Hugh Simpson's characters were often dated stereotypes. The writer portrayed Marines as mostly "god fearing" men and the majority of females were referred to as mostly sex objects or as decoration for the men.

And yes, I'm female. No, I don't like Chick Lit. Nor am I a fem nazi.

I can easily relate to the men in the majority of action novels. I've bought all the novels by Clive Cussler, Steve Becker, Mark Greaney, Tom Clancy, just to name a few. I cheer them on and want to fight side by side with them. I don't need a female lead in my action adventure. I can usually and easily relate to a male lead. Not so with these characters.

Production: Was amazing. I love, love, love the sound effects. They complimented the narrator and never drowned him out.

Narrator: Again, amazing. Chris Ritchie is an excellent narrator. He gave all the characters their own voice and it honestly felt like multiple narrators. I hope he continues to narrate. He seems to be a natural for it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Dragon Rider

  • The Wild Realms of Véneanár Series, Book 1
  • By: Errin Krystal
  • Narrated by: Rosa B. Watkinson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

Trained as an elite warrior from childhood, the elven crown prince Flintathriël fights to bring a stop to a war that began before he was born. With the aid of his betrothed Sairalindë, a skilled mage and dragon rider in her own right, they must find the Book of Souls - an ancient and mysterious tome rumored to have belonged to the god Hath’Raal. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An entertaining and quick paced fantasy.

  • By Georgiana on 12-04-18

great narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-19

I wasn't sure I wanted to finish this audio book but I've listened to the first book Rosa B. Watkinson narrated and her narrating changed my mind about female narrators. She seriously rocks. And I'm glad I did finish this audio book.

Regarding the writing: At first it seemed more on par with a stereo typical romance rather than an epic fantasy. However, the writing got much better when the action and fighting started. The writing became more original and drew me in. I don't mind romance in fantasy books and it could be I'm being too harsh on a writer's first book. I truly hope Errin Krystal keeps writing. She has created a wonderful fantasy world and her writing became riveting toward the last half of the book. I think Krystal could blow us out of the water in her next book.

The plot itself could easily have been expanded into a longer book with more character development. This would have given the author more of a chance to show how Mnuvae became evil rather than just tell us. Her past makes her behavior understandable but she wasn't developed enough for me to feel that sympathy.

As for the narrating, Watkinson was awesome. I hope she narrates the next book in Errin Krystal's fantasy romance series.

  • Neccabashar

  • By: Vee James
  • Narrated by: Hannibal Hills
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

Poor Neccabashar. As the youngest demon on the Evil Council, he’s tried everything to gain the respect of the elder demons and still they ignore and slight him at every opportunity. But Neccabashar has a plan, a scheme that will finally garner him the respect he so craves: he will bring evil and chaos to the last pure bastion of good, the Happy Kingdom. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • darkly funny!

  • By Ivy Moore on 01-14-19

darkly funny!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-19

Vee James is a fan of Terry Pratchett and it definitely shows.

In looking for a villain in Happy Kingdom, Neccabasher found the perfect person: a little girl. I had a vision of Elmyra Duff in my head during the conversations she has with her "toys" (remember "I will love him, and hug him and call him George"?) There is a good reason many horror movies use a child as an object of horror. The juxtaposition between "sweet looking" and "scary" is a successful combination. Vee James' writing is darkly comedic and while Neccabasher appears to be written for children, the macabre humor is appealing to all ages. In exploring his authors page here and on Amazon, it appears he is a newer author. He is a natural and I really hope he continues to write.

I loved this book and wow! the narrator was the icing on a very delicious cake. This is the only book I've heard narrated by Hills but his adept use of different voices is very well done. He skillfully and accurately reflects the atmosphere and humor of this audio book.

Vee James and Hannibal Hills is a great combination. I saw that James has given Neccabasher another story and I certainly hope Hills narrates that one also.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Coffee, Fireworks and Murder: An Aggie Underhill 4th of July Short Story

  • An Aggie Underhill Mystery, Book 14
  • By: Michelle Ann Hollstein
  • Narrated by: Adam Schulmerich
  • Length: 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

It appears Roger may have a secret love interest. Both Aggie and Betty are curious to learn more about this mysterious person named Pat that has Roger doing things out of his comfort zone, like going to a park to see the fireworks and making dinner reservations for an expensive restaurant. As Aggie and Betty indulge in some snooping, they accidentally stumble over a dead body that helps to solve a mystery. Unfortunately, it’s not the mystery they’d set out to solve. Will they ever learn more about Roger’s significant other?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun Short Story!

  • By Jocelyne on 12-23-18

a quick but lovely listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-19

I haven't read the rest of the Aggie Underhill mystery's but I didn't feel like I needed to have any backstory to understand what was going on. Betty and Aggie's curiosity about Roger's date was cute and I enjoyed following along as they planned to spy on Roger at the park just so they could find out more about this mystery person he was seeing.

The murder mystery was incidental and solved rather quickly. I think this could have been a much longer book. Michelle Ann Hollstein did a good job of drawing the reader in and making them feel as though they were there with Betty and Aggie. I believe this is considered a "cozy mystery" and this was my first experience with one and I liked it! It was a lovely listen.

Adam Schulmerich did an excellent job at narrating this audio book short story. I really think he has the perfect narration style for this genre. Not only that but he does an EXCELLENT female voice with no sign of the falsetto that some male narrators fall back on.

Excellent quick listen if you're commuting or wanting to listen to something over your lunch break

P.S. If you keep track of this sort of thing, there was no profanity or graphic descriptions of violence.

  • The Druid of Death

  • A Sherlock Holmes Adventure
  • By: Richard T. Ryan
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

On the morning of the vernal equinox in 1899, Holmes is roused from his bed by Lestrade. The inspector has received a report of a girl brutally murdered at Stonehenge. Upon arriving at the famed site, Holmes discovers the body of a young woman. On her forehead, painted in blood, is a druidic symbol. On her side, also in blood, is a message written in a strange language that neither Holmes nor Lestrade can decipher. The girl was also eviscerated and her organs placed around her body. As a final touch, branches from yew trees had been artistically arranged around the corpse. Holmes senses a malevolent force at work, but without data, he is powerless. As the weeks pass, he slowly gathers information about the ancient druids and Celtic mythology and begins to assemble a small army of experts to assist him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Holmes returns in the vein of Sir Arthur himself

  • By Ray Johnson on 09-03-18

true to the author

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-19

This was my first experience with a new author for the Sherlock Holmes character. As in an author taking up the pen in an effort to capture the nuances of ACD writing. I've always wanted to read or listen to another authors take on the first consulting detective so I was happy to grab a copy of this.

I've listened to quite a few of Sherlock Holmes and often on repeat. I've also watched a few of the movies and TV shows dealing with this duo. I always find it interesting to see how other's choose to portray the famous duo. Even the gender bending. I think the only version I didn't care for was Nigel Bruce and that was more the way Watson was screen written and therefore, portrayed. I listened to Nigel Bruce on many of the radio plays he did and quite liked his character there.

I think the Richard T. Ryan does a very good job with capturing Watson's voice and explaining the finding of this "new" story. In this new adventure Holmes and Watson experience deal with murders that involve Druid-paganism. There is some explanation of pagan related beliefs and tools that is done very well.

There are other reviews that complain about Nigel Peever's version of Holmes. Peever has chosen to portray the character as a person who speaks carefully and much slower than the cocaine-fueled versions we've experienced in the cinema. It does take some getting used to. His voice does capture the arrogance of Sherlock Holmes very well and his Watson is superb.

Definitely an enjoyable listen.

  • Mirror Empires: Sky Lords of Khartoum

  • By: Michael G. Thomas
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

Welcome to the Mirror Empires, where reality is distorted, and war threatens to engulf the world. It is 1898, and soldiers armed with the latest weapons clash with the unstoppable power of the Sky Lords and their aerial armadas in new and uncharted realms. Jack never expected to spend his 19th birthday crashing a stolen flying machine into the middle of a war. But when he saw soldiers with bolt-action rifles up against an advanced species, he knew he’d found something incredible.  

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • action and adventure

  • By Ivy Moore on 01-08-19

action and adventure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-19

This was an enjoyable listen. It's style is a blend of older sci-fi stories and the classic adventure stories written about English gentleman adventurers back before the world wars. Which make sense as it's set in that time period. Great job at capturing that nostalgic sense of adventure without making it feel over done. There was the barest hint of romance but it was overshadowed by the adventure. It never got awkward or mushy ... yay!

Pro's: There is a LOT of action which I love and it's well written. There is also a touch of steampunk in some of the devices used for transportation. In the science part there is an attempt to explain how things worked but it doesn't get bogged down with too much detail. Michael G. Thomas had strong female characters that were actually relate-able, albeit they were alien women but I don't care ... I'll take it! Strong English warrior women would not have been the norm in that time period. Also the writer didn't fall into the rut of making all the women beautiful and dressing them in sexy armor. It was their strength and ethics that made them beautiful. YUSS! Thank you sir!
The narrator is very impressive. I forgot at times that Nigel Peever was the ONLY narrator. I've been meh about his female voices in the past but I didn't notice so much this novel. Maybe because he imparted strength into the female characters? Or I could be getting used to his "feminine" voice ;) Either way, keep an eye out for books with his narrations. He is in my top ten narrator list.

Con's: The background music in some area's became repetitive, especially the New Age stuff that provided a back drop to the alien master overlords. A couple times the music was a bit too loud for the narration to be heard clearly. This is NOT a critique of the use of such sound effects as I really enjoy this kind of production.

I would definitely recommend this audiobook

  • Dark Oak

  • The Dark Oak Chronicles, Book 1
  • By: Jacob Sannox
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 12 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

Humanity has finally defeated the Dark Lord, but Morrick fought on the wrong side. Though he was a slave, he is branded a traitor and must earn the trust of new lords in order to return to his family, if they are still alive.... Now that their common enemy is dead, the nobles begin to forget old loyalties, and Queen Cathryn’s realm looks set to plunge into war once more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely Fantastic!!

  • By Shannon G on 01-18-19

Beautiful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-19

First off this is a sound enhanced reading. There is music and sound effects to accompany the reading. Peever is EXCELLENT as a narrator as he changes his voice for different characters. His female voice is a bit falsetto for my taste but that's a very small gripe in a fantastically larger picture. If you're not into sound effects and music with your readings then I'd go elsewhere but I will warn you that you will be missing out on a great production.
First for the writing: Jacob Sannox does a great job at writing. There were a few places I would have thought a gifted editor could have tightened up his focus. But I'd also be concerned that an editor would start chopping some of the stuff that makes this writing so brilliant. This is one of those books that stays with you for a long time afterwards. And there are some twists, turns and wtf moments too.
I'd probably describe this as a dark fantasy with some elements of horror? I had to stay up until the early hours to finish it. That's how engrossed I got in the world that Sannox has created. It may start off slow and the beginning felt like it could have used a prequel but I caught up soon enough.
Peever has entered my top ten list of narrators. His ability to grasp accents, voices and ages of characters is truly gifted.
And holy sh*t ... the production. The altered voices of some of the fantasy creatures is imaginative on an epic scale. I think the production and sound effects really made this reading an engrossing listen. You are drawn into a fantasy world by the sound effects. This was an excellent book for this type of production. OH! And the volume of the sound effects is spot on. They didn't drown out the narrator or make the reading difficult to understand.
Highly recommend this audiobook!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Innocence of Father Brown: Centennial Edition

  • G. K. Chesterton, Book 4
  • By: G. K. Chesterton, Chesterton Books
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

This is a new edition of the first collection of G. K. Chesterton's masterful mysteries, The Innocence of Father Brown. Contains 12 thrilling tales, including "The Blue Cross", "The Invisible Man", and "The Sins of Prince Saradine". The audiobook is expertly narrated by British actor Nigel Peever, who brings to life Father Brown and all of Chesterton's marvelous characters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Nice visit with the father

  • By DivaC on 12-24-18

wonderful narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

I've read the Father Brown series numerous times so the fact that I'm already a fan of G. K. Chesterton is well established. Father Brown is a character that has the ability to think like a criminal and yet hold onto his core of ethics. Father Brown is not a contemporary detective. This series was written some time ago (around the first world war) and so the stories reflect that era. One of my favorite things about this character is his wandering thoughts. He is more concerned with the repentance of the criminal rather than the prosecution of him.

Nigel Peever's voice is an excellent match for the Father Brown series. I wasn't sure what to expect as I have also listened to the dramatization and seen several TV versions of these books. I was pleasantly surprised. Peever creates different voices (and accents) for each character and yet he is easily able to capture that nostalgic feeling that you want to experience with this mystery series.

I also got a sense of the character's age which is wonderfully unique. His pacing, enunciation and breath control is excellent. His performance just feels effortless I think it's the sign of a skilled narrator when their performance allows you to forget you're being read to and focus on the story instead.


  • Last Stand

  • Star Legions, Book 4
  • By: Michael G. Thomas
  • Narrated by: Shamaan Casey
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

The Black Legion has vanquished every army and fleet sent against it, yet now this invincible Legion is in full retreat as it races away from the Emperor’s wrath. They gambled all on a single decisive battle and with it lost everything. With victory against the Emperor now impossible, the Legion finds itself lacking purpose and money. They came to the Empire with promises of glory and reward, but now they are trapped and surrounded on all sides by enemies. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great addition

  • By Kaz on 01-25-19

excellent pairing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-02-19

First off, in my opinion, this is not really a stand alone novel. The story itself was complete and very well written but I felt like I was missing character development. The first few books probably covered that but unfortunately, I listened to a sample of the first audio book in this series and wasn't keen on the narrator. At all.

As for the writing, Michael Thomas does a really great job. I feel like he could easily write battle scenes for action movies, that's how detailed and clearly he portrayed the battle. I could picture the battle in my head as Casey read. However, I got confused at times over names and who they were gender-wise but again I think that might have been because I came into the series midstream. I may try to read the first of the series instead of listening if I have the time.

As this book mostly covered one battle, I probably would have struggled to finish it except that the narrator is THAT GOOD. I don't know where Shamaan Casey has been all my audio book life but I think he is definitely someone to keep an eye on. His reading of this book was spot on. He also did female voices without the agonizing falsetto that some male narrators resort to. Casey has a very deep voice so accomplishing a female voice successfully was a bit surprising but happily so.

In all seriousness, I recommend that the first books be re-done with Casey as a narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful