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  • Every Secret Thing

  • By: Susanna Kearsley
  • Narrated by: Katherine Kellgren
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 495
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 458
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 446

No one lives forever. But the truth survives us all. Kate Murray is deeply troubled. In front of her lies a dead man, a stranger who only minutes before had approached her wanting to tell her about a mystery, a long-forgotten murder. The crime was old, he'd told her, but still deserving of justice. Soon Kate is caught up in a dangerous whirlwind of events that takes her back into her grandmother's mysterious war-time past and across the Atlantic as she tries to retrace the dead man's footsteps.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Liked the Book - But The Narrator Drove Me Nuts

  • By Mari on 01-12-17

I will truly read anything written by this author!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-27-17

I've read or listened to nearly all of Ms. Kearsley's books, and most have some sort of mystery element, history element, and romance element. I have thoroughly enjoyed each and every one. Ever since I first opened and read The Winter Sea, I started buying up her books, eagerly devouring them. Many, if not most of them, have a far-in-the-past history element, and that was the initial draw... her descriptions, characterizations and plots simply make a book seem like a vacation to a different time. It's like being Dr.Who when you read! (That was for my fellow Sci-fi nerds.).

This book is a bit different. There is still the mystery (actually a crime to solve... a cold case), but the history takes place during a recent generation. After all, many of us living today had close family members (grandparents or parents, etc) who remembered WWII. Instead of making this novel less exciting, it seemed to have even more relevance, almost as if this could be a true crime novel. There was still a romance element to this book, but it was only there in a distant sort of way, you'll understand what I mean if you read/listen to the book. It wasn't so much a love in passing, like ships passing in the night, but a slow simmering type of journey back in time, all of it being told 2nd or 3rd hand. No passion, just sentiment for the past. Which is the way many of us still think of the way things were back in the 40s, so the romance element truly set the scene. Like the romance and the overall arc of the story were kindred spirits. The crime was also relevant enough and carried over enough into the "now" for some heart pounding, which makes for a more enjoyable novel.

As for the reader/narrator, I've listened to Katherine Kellgren many times before, and it's always a great experience. She does different voices for different people, but instead of putting on a fake-deep male voices, her own voice is perfect for a simply changing the timbre, the accent, the tone, or maybe adding some roughness, so that when she speaks the parts for men, you forget you're listening to a woman. If I think hard, I can still tell a woman is speaking, but she pulls the reader so far into the book, and so easily, that thinking of anything beyond the story itself, getting caught in the sheer excitement and drama of it, almost seems impossible.

I had a friend in the college orchestra once. They performed in the orchestra pit during school plays. After one play (not a concert, but a play), a friend came by to tell her how great the orchestra sounded during the show. My friend didn't say much until the person left, but then she turned to me, disappointed. She said, "we must've done a poor job of it." I asked why she would say that after receiving a compliment, and she pointed out, "during a play, we are supposed to bring the observer INto the play, not bring them OUT of it to listen to us." When I listen to a book read by Katherine Kellgren, I think she makes a great orchestra. Very seldom do I think "wow, what a good reader" when she reads, only noticing after the fact that I listened to a narrated book, instead of living in the story.

I will miss the characters from Every Secret Thing, especially the character who died first.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Accidental Werewolf

  • Accidentally Friends, Book 1
  • By: Dakota Cassidy
  • Narrated by: Meredith Mitchell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,230
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,126
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,127

When Marty Andrews gets bitten by a mangy mutt while walking her teacup poodle, her blond hair darkens, the hair on her legs starts growing at an alarming rate, and her mood swings put her dream job as a sales rep for Bobbie-Sue Cosmetics in serious jeopardy. Then a drool-worthy man shows up at her door claiming that he accidentally bit Marty. And since he's a werewolf, she is now, too. Thinking Keegan Flaherty is clearly insane, Marty refuses to believe a word until a kidnapping makes her realize there's more at stake than just her highlights.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I love Cassidy's humor!

  • By mississippi on 07-18-14

Bought this based on Witchless in Seattle, but...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-17

I have truly been enjoying the Witchless in Seattle series, and I cannot wait for more of the same from this author; however, The Accidental Werewolf (TAW) is a disappointment on so many levels.

1) This story is not as well fleshed-out as the other series. I felt like I was dropped in somewhere in the middle of the story. We catch up eventually, but the story was still less nuanced.
2) The WIS series is FUNNY. Laugh out loud funny, and I couldn't wait to read each successive book (can't wait to read the next one). TAW is very humorous, but not nearly as much fun.
3) There is less sex in the other series. I've read my share of romance and fantasy romance, etc., but the sex scenes get old. I can always fast forward through these (they are always the same), but I wasn't expecting so much sex, at least not after listening to the other series by the same author. Just a personal preference.
4) The LANGUAGE. The language in the WIS series isn't prudish, but it is much easier on the ears. The main character, along with others, in TAW drops an F-bomb nearly every other sentence. It's distracting and annoying. If I hadn't read other books by the same author, books in which a more varied vocabulary was used, I would assume this author had little knowledge of the English language. I get that the main character is supposed to be a little out of control of herself, feeling angrier ever since she was bitten and turned, but did she also forget her basic vocabulary? This may be a personal preference, and yes, I grew up in the south, but use of too much slang or profanity annoys me. Like when listening to a professor who tries to act "cool" in front of the students, I find myself cringing at the cliche of foul language used as a way of showing anger. As I mentioned before, I would assume this author had a limited writing vocabulary, had I not read other books of hers. And she DOES have talent, but TAW does not showcase the extent of that talent's influence.
5) This point is definitely a personal preference, though I don't think it should be. The use of "Jesus" as a curse word does not endear a book to me. For those who are Christian, this use is probably offensive. To those who are not Christians, imagine the outrage (political, social, and personal) if a person were to use the name of the god of another religion as an example of cursing or foul language? It would sound horrible, and people would cringe. It's simply offensive. But to use language like "Christ on a stick" (especially considering the way he was ultimately killed) over and over in a book? It's just a sick figure of speech. I want my money back. I do not think I'm being prudish when I take offense.

Unfortunately, I purchased SEVERAL books in this series based solely on my own feelings for the WIS series. I don't think I'll waste my time with the rest of this series, though.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Kitty and the Dead Man's Hand

  • Kitty Norville, Book 5
  • By: Carrie Vaughn
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 993
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 721
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 720

Already the alpha pair of Denver's werewolf pack, Kitty and Ben now plan to tie the knot human-style by eloping to Las Vegas. Kitty is looking forward to sipping froufrou drinks by the pool and doing her popular radio show on live television, but her hotel is stocked with werewolf-hating bounty hunters.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Renewed my Vows in Vegas Right After Reading this!

  • By Ali on 01-30-12

Not my favorite, but I can see the need for it...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

My rating: Teen (violence)
Favorite character/s: Brenda/Evan

Kitty and Ben are planning a wedding, but werewolves hate crowds.... Solution? Vegas, baby! The whole idea seems ideal, until: 1) Mom and Dad want to come along, 2) Kitty's boss wants her to do a televised radio show from Vegas, and 3) Rick wants her to deliver a message (supposedly an introduction) to the Vegas master vamp Dom. Ben agrees, as long as Kitty will let him gamble all he wants. Sexy blue wedding dress? Check! Kicky heels? Check! Sexy fiancé? Check? Mom and Dad? Check????

So far so good, and I was all in, but the storyline gets a little muddled and far fetched once they get to Vegas. (I know, I know, it's a werewolf story with vampires thrown in, it's supposed to be farfetched, right?). The problem isn't so much that we start dealing with the possibility of more "otherness", it's that so much is thrown at us at once. All in one book. All in one town, and all at the same time. Some of the story breaks down.

What happens to Ben? We find out at the end, but even that explanation is muddled by Evan's part in it. Why does there have to be an "Evan's part" to begin with? It made more sense without Evan's contribution. Don't get me wrong; I'm very glad that Evan and Brenda are in the book, and I hope they show up in other books, but the whole "what happened to Ben" part was really confusing, and I'm not sure it really moved the story except as a plot device. It was just too convenient.

Then there's the vampire Dom. He's just odd. His speech is odd, his mannerisms are odd, and his whole network is odd. Why did Rick send her to Dom? Does Rick suspect something? I hope we find out that Rick suspected something, otherwise his reasons for sending Kitty to Dom are a little...I'm not sure. I'm hoping this one works toward the long game, and wasn't just another plot device.

The Vegas lycanthrope debacle was an interesting introduction for a different supernatural development, but I wasn't as fond of the way these lycanthropes were introduced. I don't know, I guess it just put my hackles up. And there was the magician... I'm intrigued by him, and I hope he shows up in another book. I also hope we get to see what the backstory is between him and the lycanthropes in Vegas. And the priestess; I guess we'll find out more about her in another book.

That's my point though, this book wasn't that long, but the story went in so many directions, it feels like the whole story was muddled. Where was the buildup? And what about the...cliffhanger is the wrong word, but it's obviously a lead-in to another book. One of the things I really liked about these books was their standalone storylines. Not that each book doesn't need some sort of backstory after the first one, but the plots are "whole" somehow. This entire book feels more like a plot device for future books. Not that I haven't already purchased those other books, but I hope they don't turn out the same way. I really enjoyed the previous episodes, and I want to enjoy future ones just as much. I'll chalk this one up to "world building", and hope for the best.

As always, Marguerite Gavin delivers a fine performance.

  • Kitty and the Silver Bullet

  • Kitty Norville, Book 4
  • By: Carrie Vaughn
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,209
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 849
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 851

Kitty's radio show is as popular as ever, and she has a boyfriend who actually seems to understand her. Can she finally settle down to a normal life? Not if this is just the calm before the storm. When her mother falls ill, Kitty rushes back to Denver - and right back to the abusive pack of werewolves she escaped a year ago. To make matters worse, a war is brewing between the city's two oldest vampires, threatening the whole supernatural community.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brought me to tears

  • By Patricia on 07-08-10

This means war!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

My rating: Teen (violence)
Favorite character: Kitty's mom

It'll be difficult to write about this book without spoilers, but I'll give it a try. Kitty's family is dealing with personal hardship, and Kitty decides to return to Denver to be with them. She has been kicked out of Denver by the local pack alphas, so she has to keep a very low profile.... You can see where this is going. Kitty? Low profile? Hah!

The vampires are behaving strangely, or MORE strangely, and there is a new vamp in town. She's a famous actress/singer, and she's been on stage for more than 40 years...without aging. She wants to out herself on Kitty's show, so Kitty does the radio show out of the Denver office while the vamp is in town for a concert. The vamp seems so nice, so easy to talk to, so accommodating; fake much? Oh yeah! And Kitty gets mixed up in the middle of it, taking Ben with her. She also decides to help a young wolf with daddy issues, and that can't be good either. Needless to say, Carl and Meg find out she's in Denver, and they're out for blood.

The whole story gets royally mixed up, until it's hard to tell where the good guys are, and Kitty's group of friends have to straighten things out. We even find out more about vampire culture in this one. It's a rip-roaring ride! Very fast-paced and exciting.

  • Kitty Takes a Holiday

  • Kitty Norville, Book 3
  • By: Carrie Vaughn
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 906
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 912

After getting caught turning wolf on national television, Kitty retreats to a mountain cabin to recover and write her memoirs. But this is Kitty, so trouble is never far behind, and instead of Walden Pond, she gets Evil Dead.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A great escape...Kitty takes a holiday!

  • By Helen on 02-13-10

Back west we go...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

My rating: Teen (violence)
Favorite character: Tony

Okay, so Kitty is taking a break from the limelight, and after what happened to her in DC, who could blame her. She feels violated, and the first half of the book deals with her complacency and insecurities, but it also deals with the growing idea that someone doesn't like her much.

Cormack and Ben play a bigger part in this book, and honestly, it's hard to say which character has the more exciting role. Between the changes in Ben and the changes in the life of Cormack, both guys add spice to the sauce, so to speak. There is some romance in this book, and I'm happy to say that it doesn't take over. Carrie Vaughn has a very tasteful way of writing about sex; it doesn't get graphic, and it doesn't go on and on (which is easier to deal with on paper than audio).

We get a little local color and some Navajo heritage mixed in during this episode, and that's where my favorite character (for this book) comes in. Tony is a curandero,, and he shows up to offer his advice on some town issues.

Marguerite Gavin is still offering a good narration in this book as well. She may not have the absolute most talented voice out there, but her natural voice is so easy to listen to, and her voice for Kitty is wonderful. She differentiates between characters well, and I really liked her voice for Tony. I'll be looking for her more often.

This book is obviously buiding up to something more.... You can see that there are other storylines, other plots unfolding on the horizon. Looking forward to more.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Kitty Goes to Washington

  • Kitty Norville, Book 2
  • By: Carrie Vaughn
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,537
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,114
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,113

The country's only celebrity werewolf, late-night radio host Kitty Norville prefers to be heard, not seen. But when she's invited to testify at a Senate hearing on behalf of supernaturals, her face gets plastered on national television. Kitty has been in hot water before, but jumping into the D.C. underworld brings a new set of problems---and a new set of friends and enemies.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Kitty Series

  • By G Reinhardt on 08-02-10

Conspiracy anyone?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

My rating: Teen
Favorite character: Alette (sp?)

Kitty takes her show on the road, and since she is asked to speak at a congressional hearing about the existence of supernaturals, she plans to do her radio show from DC. Unfortunately, she hits a few bumps on that road. This episode takes us from vampires, to shady researchers, to crazed politicians, to lycanthropes, back to vampires, and around again.

Kitty ends up getting more publicity than she expected, and not in a good way. The congressional hearing offers up the most excitement CSPAN has ever had. Shady research goes too far, and vampires will surprise you. This book is even better than the 1st in the series.

  • Kitty and The Midnight Hour

  • Kitty Norville, Book 1
  • By: Carrie Vaughn
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,690
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,969
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,969

Kitty Norville is a midnight-shift DJ for a Denver radio station---and a werewolf in the closet. Sick of lame song requests, she accidentally starts "The Midnight Hour," a late-night advice show for the supernaturally disadvantaged. After desperate vampires, werewolves, and witches across the country begin calling in to share their woes, her new show is a raging success.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pleasant Surprise!

  • By Austin gal on 08-08-09

Interesting take on werewolves...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

My rating: Teen (language)
Favorite character: Kitty

The interesting thing about these werewolves is the insecure nature of the wolf. Even the more dominant wolves are portrayed as behaving more like real wolves...shying away from crowds and even handshakes, and bristling at any perceived aggression.

I love that Kitty is a werewolf's name. The main character hosts a late night radio talk show, and the show begins to get a little "strange", as in discussing the odd and the strange or supernatural. Kitty has callers who want to talk about the problems encountered in the supernatural community, and the radio show begins to interfere with Kitty's relationship with her pack leaders...not a bad thing. Kitty has to make some hard decisions, and we meet another interesting character, Cormack.

The narrator does a great job of differentiating between the characters, even though she doesn't alter her voice drastically when reading for different speakers. Overall, this is a solid start to a series.

  • The Graveyard Book: Full-Cast Production

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman, Derek Jacobi, Robert Madge, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,238
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,425
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,394

Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn't live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead. There are dangers and adventures in the graveyard for a boy. But if Bod leaves the graveyard, then he will come under attack from the man Jack - who has already killed Bod's family…

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unique children's story... Loved it!

  • By shelley on 12-04-17

Now a Neil Gaiman fan for sure!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-16

My rating: G to PG (violent situations); A+++ great story
Favorite character: not sure, so many from which to choose!

This is a delightfully rich story about a toddler whose family is murdered, and when the killer goes to the boy's bedroom to kill him, he finds the boy has gone. It turns out that the boy has toddled off to the ancient graveyard/local park across the way. When the killer follows him to the cemetery, the local ghosts (and friends) protect the boy and decide to raise him and guard him from the dangers of the outside world.

We don't find out until late in the story just *why* the boy is slated for murder, or why he has to be protected in the years to come, but he is only safe in the cemetery, and he is given the run of the graveyard, such that he can not only see and hear the ghosts, but he can touch them as well. His guardian is a mysterious character we are given to understand is not quite a ghost, but something "other" and his teachers range from ghosts to another who is "other". Each chapter is a new adventure, and through the whole story we are concerned for the boy's (who is named Nobody, because he looks like himself and nobody else) safety, as there is still a target on his life.

The narration and performance are exquisitely done, with each character having a separate voice, and the book ends with a wonderful little snippet from Mr. Gaiman about where he got the idea for the plot and the characters. The whole project is professionally finished, with wonderful touches such as music and sound effects that, far from detracting, only add to the story.

The only thing I would warn listeners about is that between each chapter, there is a musical interlude that is long enough to almost convince you that the story is at an end...don't be fooled. Even though some of the chapters draw to a close so neatly that they could easily be the ending of the book, there is always another adventure around the corner. It's not over until the author comes in to tell us the background.

I've listened to only one other Neil Gaiman story, which I also thoroughly enjoyed (Neverwhere), but I assumed it was an outlier for some reason, as I had heard Mr. Gaiman described as a writer of horror similar to Stephen King. While I have nothing against Mr. King or his writings, Mr. Gaiman definitely has a different style, and neither the Graveyard Book nor Neverwhere are in any way horror related. Both are wonderfully quirky stories, reminiscent (to me anyway) of much more professionally done Twilight Zone episodes (with better story lines...and this comes from a *big* TZ fan).

Thank you Mr. Gaiman for sharing your brilliance and your talent with the world. I will be listening to many more of your stories. (And I plan to relisten to the two listed above very soon.)

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Gretel and the Case of the Missing Frog Prints

  • A Brothers Grimm Mystery
  • By: P. J. Brackston
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 783
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 714
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 718

Bavaria, 1776. When Albrecht Dürer the Much Much Younger's frog prints go missing, he knows exactly where to turn for help. Gretel (yes, that Gretel), now 35 and still living with her gluttonous brother Hans, is the country's most famous private investigator, and she leaps at the opportunity to travel to cosmopolitan Nuremberg to take on the case. But amid the hubbub of the city's annual sausage festival, Gretel struggles to find any clues that point toward the elusive thief.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining Mystery

  • By Marianne on 01-18-15

Almost quit after a couple of chapters, but then

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-16

My rating for this book: G to PG (some sexual situations...there is a brothel)
Favorite character: Gottfried(sp?)

An interesting take on fairly tale characters, though that is not the basis for the book, just the characters. The protagonist (Gretel) is not a very likable character, especially at first, and this made it difficult for me to enjoy the book at first. She is bossy, superior, superficial, and selfish. We later find that she can be engaging, entertaining, and even insecure, but she is not likely to be a favorite character, even at the end of the novel.

Her brother Hans is slightly more lovable, though he is lazy and stupid, and his friends are also lazy and stupid. His character, though he appears throughout the book, is never fleshed out, as the only thing the listener is supposed to surmise is that he is lazy and stupid, but still devoted to his sister. The mystery is always in the foreground, but the entertainment of the book lies in the situations (and humor) that Gretel finds herself in...and usually in front of the man she wishes to form a relationship with (Gen Ferdinand Von Ferdinand). Many of these situations are silly. Many of the characters are silly, Much of the story is silly, and yet... Once I decided to stick with it, I was pulled into the narrative.

I found I ended up enjoying myself (somewhat), much the way one enjoys a sitcom once you realize it's a sitcom, and not supposed to be taken too seriously. This book is light fare - something you can listen to while doing something else - and you don't need to take note of every detail. It's silly fun, which means it's not for everyone, but if you like sitcoms, or need to be cheered a bit, this may be for you. It's not laugh out loud funny, but it made me smile a few times. I did not like the book or the characters for SEVERAL chapters, but I'll admit, that I would be willing to listen to a sequel... Perhaps not now, perhaps only if the book is on sale or when I need some cheering.

I don't recommend this for everyone, especially if you need some meaning in what you read or have difficulty with silliness, but I would recommend it for pre-teens or for people who just need to get away from all reality. You may wish to try it while it's on sale to see if it's for you.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Indexing: Reflections

  • Indexing Series, Book 2
  • By: Seanan McGuire
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 578
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 535
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 533

The struggle against not-so-charming storybook narratives isn't the only complicating factor in Henrietta "Henry" Marchen's life. As part of the ATI Management Bureau team protecting the world from fairy tales gone awry, she's juggling her unwanted new status as a Snow White, dealing with a potentially dangerous Pied Piper, and wrangling a most troublesome wicked stepsister - along with a budding relationship with Jeff, her teammate.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Irritating narrator

  • By Alie on 05-10-17

Great 2nd book for the series.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-16

My rating: R (language); A++ for originality
Favorite character: Sloan again (The Valley Girl accent is grating, but the character is so redeeming of it!)

The ATI is still dedicated to stopping the Narrative, and our team members are still the same, Henry, Sloan, Jeff, Andy, and Demi (though others join the team at some point in the story and those characters are very interesting). I'm still greatly impressed by the world building here. So much thought (and so much background) goes into the idea behind the plot and the... If you'll excuse the pun...narrative of the story. I had no idea there were that many Snow White variations, though I'm intrigued enough to look into it myself.

We find out a LOT more about how the Narrative works, we find out Sloan's past (and just how long she's been with the ATI), and we find out more about our Bluebeard character. We even find out more about the Deputy Director (and possibly his reason for joining the ATI). There is so much information packed into this book that I'll likely have to listen again before the next one comes out (if another is coming). There is enough here that this could easily be the final installment, and enough that isn't explained that this could be the beginning of the series. Yes, the author is just that good.

Overall, I highly recommend this book, though to understand what is going on, I strongly suggest reading the first book in the series. This one is not a stand alone book.