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Jennifer

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Why correlates to the mission or vision

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-18

Sinek lays out his Golden Circle concept of Why How and What then precedes to use a few well-known companies, mainly Apple as examples to explain the importance of keeping the Why at the forefront of decision making as to the what and how. Great leaders can keep the buy-in going for as long as needed. Overall a good refresher read for those of us who get lost in the day to day operations of a business and away from the grand purpose

Clever Storyline, ho-hum narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-18

Matthew Sullivan, the author, does a skillful job of leading the reader down a path that has the reader only asking why the heinous crime was committed not who committed it when suddenly things go a different direction, and the pace of the story picks up the momentum leading to a not so expected resolution. There are a few parts of the story I thought dragged a bit, but the book kept my attention until the end. Some of narrator Madeleine Mabby’s male voices are too emotionless and bland to the extent of being a distraction from the story. Overall I enjoyed the storyline and would recommend the book. A print version may be a better option if you are particular about narration quality.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Down to earth political memoir

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-18

I am a regular listener to Dan Pfeiffer’s Pod Save America Podcast so was looking forward to reading Yes We (Still) Can and this book does not disappoint. The stories about working for Senator and then President Obama as communications director are engaging and insightful. Pfeiffer shares some of his personal life such as his upbringing (lifelong Democrat), how he married a White house co-worker and his health scare. I like that Pfeiffer narrates this book since these are his thoughts and experiences and it lets his personality come across and yes at times he speaks too fast and more inflection would be nice. Overall seven hours and a half hours spent on politics from Dan Pfeiffer’s insider perspective is a time I did not mind sharing.

Time is what I make of it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

My first exposure to Laura Vanderkam and her ideas about time. I like how she suggests focusing on small changes that when added up will have a significant impact on how much time we have available for people and activities we derive happiness from in our lives. I am curious to see if my perception of how I spend my time is actually in alignment with how I spend my time, so I am going to download the time tracking spreadsheet mentioned in the book. I like Laura’s conversational style of narration. Overall an easy but thoughtful read.

The engrossing true story of a psychopath

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

Well, written and narrated story of Elizabeth Holmes, the founder of Theranos. The book starts with her youth highlighting the fact she had plans of not only becoming a billionaire but also of saving the world. As a young adult fashioning herself in the image of Apple creator, Steve Jobs, she embarks on a dangerous course of inventing a poorly functioning blood testing device, and through deception and manipulation she attracts high powered investors and has pharmacies such Walgreens and Safeway begging to have the Edison blood testing device connected to their clinics. As things at Theranos start going wrong with not being able to deliver a fully functioning finished product Holmes, her closest allies and her attorneys resort to intimidation and actual threats to keep theTheranos con gong. You would think I have just written the synopsis of a fictional telling; unfortunately, Theranos and Holmes’ actions surrounding Theranos are real. Thanks to John Carreyrou’s investigative journalism and whistleblower Tyler Schultz the horror going on was brought out none too soon. Overall a superb read.

5,4,3,2,1, just do it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I finished this book yesterday, and I am just writing a review today because I had to use the 5 Second rule to take the time to write this review now instead of saying to self I will get to it later. The 5 Second Rule is a good tool to use for motivating oneself to take action and stop procrastination and overthinking decisions. The 5 Second Rule is an easy tool to use, and I will incorporate it into my daily life. No, this book is not revolutionary, it just reminds us to take action and not stay static if we want to achieve something in our lives. I do think the book should have been shorter; many of the filler testimonials to Mel’s greatness for sharing the 5 Second Rule are not needed. 7 hours 37 minutes is too much talk to cover the actual concepts contained in the book. This book is an extension of her TEDx talk.

Idea meritocracy and radical transparency

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

My main take away is this is an excellent book for founders of small businesses who are starting to scale up since they can establish a culture of openness and principles which aline with an idea meritocracy environment. The work principles not as useful for managers in large corporations or government agencies since it will take years to pivot radical transparency. The first part of the book detailing Ray Dalio’s life and creation of Bridgewater Associates hedge fund and its success provides the foundation for why you and I should devote sixteen plus hours to listening to what he has to impart on us. Reading this book in a different format instead of audible would make finding appendix references easier. Overall an enlightening read

Practical advice for CEOs non-tech start-ups too

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-18

The first half of the book covers Horowitzcz’s life and focuses on all his successes. The latter part of the book is where you should take notes. Management debt, technical debt and other real challenges that a start-up CEO may encounter. The writing style is casual with liberal use of profanity. Ben Horowitz a war-time CEO is conveyed in Kevin Kenerly’s narration, I listened to one of Horowitz's podcast to hear his actual voice. I subscribed to the podcast. Overall some good advice for new CEOs and at under eight hours, not a long read to come away with something you may find useful now or the near future

Applicable to non-manufacturing environments also

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

This book by using the Socratic teaching method and a multiple character narration simplifies the concepts of Continuous Improvement and introduces a potion of TOC. The Goal is a long book, but the story format helps move the learning forward. There are parts of the book that are dated. Overall a helpful book if you manage projects, departments or an entire business.

Interesting, quick read, covers a lot of topics

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-18

I admit I was not at all familiar with Franchesca Ramsey’s Youtube videos or her podcast with husband Patrick, before deciding to read Well, That Escalated Quickly. Franchesca describes her years creating videos and developing a small audience then taking off with the release of SWGSBG and learning how to navigate the ups and downs of social media and internet fame. I was informed and at times amused by her story. I am not in the target demo for this book, but I walked away with a feeling of time well spent. Overall a nice summer read