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Mihal Ceittin

Charleston, SC
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 3
  • ratings
  • Buddhism

  • By: Malcolm David Eckel, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Malcolm David Eckel
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 844
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 767
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 753

Buddhism has captivated many millions of people around the world, its vitality and adaptability enabling it to transform the civilizations of India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan, and also become a lively component in the cultures of Europe, Australia, and the Americas. But have you ever wondered how a religion that doesn't even have a god could have accomplished this?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Much ado about Nothingness.

  • By Jonathan D. Stringer on 02-11-15

Strictly Academic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-18

Perhaps because I am a somewhat familiar with Buddhist practice on a personal level, I found this course to be dry and generally 'academic' in tone, which is no surprise as Dr. Eckel is a college teacher in Boston. It literally dances from one topic to the next but fails to address the 'heart' of Buddhism. On the other hand, for the complete initiate it might provide a guide to basic terms and historical events and concepts. I also found the canned applause before and after each lecture to be silly.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Far Empty

  • By: J. Todd Scott
  • Narrated by: T. Ryder Smith
  • Length: 11 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49

Seventeen-year-old Caleb Ross is adrift in the wake of the sudden disappearance of his mother more than a year ago, and is struggling to find his way out of the small Texas border town of Murfee. Chris Cherry is a newly minted sheriff's deputy, a high school football hero who has reluctantly returned to his hometown.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Texas Noir

  • By Mihal Ceittin on 03-16-18

Texas Noir

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-18

Mr. Scott has created a very compelling set of characters set in the badlands of fictional Murphy, Texas....somewhere in the border area of Southwest Texas. Ironically, the character who gets the least convincing psychological development is the 'hero' Deputy Cherry, but there is enough of him there to give him weight. I would have liked a little more exposition of the criminal backstory which animates a lot of the tale but as it stands it is well worth a listener's time. Would always read/listen to something by Mr. Scott.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Invisible Man

  • A Novel
  • By: Ralph Ellison
  • Narrated by: Joe Morton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,991
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,434
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,438

Ralph Elllison's Invisible Man is a monumental novel, one that can well be called an epic of 20th-century African-American life. It is a strange story, in which many extraordinary things happen, some of them shocking and brutal, some of them pitiful and touching - yet always with elements of comedy and irony and burlesque that appear in unexpected places.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Masterfully written; perfectly narrated

  • By Imhokhai on 03-04-13

One of the greatest American novels ever written

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-31-17

Like many I read Invisible Man when I was too young to appreciate the full depth of its artistry. This is an incredible story of one man's fight for identity and dignity in an absurd world. Invisible Man should be ranked with novels like The Stranger and Notes From the Underground as an existentialist classic. The performance/reading by Joe Morton ranks among the best I have ever heard. He brings the story to life in a way that silent reading could never accomplish. This is a masterly rendition of an American masterpiece.