LISTENER

I. Burnett

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 6
  • ratings
  • The Vampire Next Door

  • The True Story of the Vampire Rapist
  • By: J.T. Hunter, RJ Parker Publishing
  • Narrated by: Rob Shamblin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 69

John Crutchley seemed to be living the American Dream. Good-looking and blessed with a genius level IQ, he had a prestigious, white-collar job at a prominent government defense contractor, where he held top secret security clearance and handled projects for NASA and the Pentagon. To all outward appearances, he was a hard-working, successful family man with a lavish new house, a devoted wife, and a healthy young son.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Chilling but good true story!

  • By Claudia Shoultes on 09-15-16

Gripping story, terrible narrating!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-16

This story was sad and fascinating. However, I had to force myself to finish it because the narrator was reading the story in a sing song manner. Though his style is OK for narrating a TV show, where you don't hear much from the narrator, to hear it for hours at a time is really annoying. Who really reads that way, anyway? Had the story not been so interesting I would have given up in the first chapter. I guess I'll just start looking up books by narrator in the future. Kevin Pierce is excellent.

  • Robert Black

  • The True Story of a Child Rapist and Serial Killer from the United Kingdom
  • By: C.L. Swinney
  • Narrated by: Don Kline
  • Length: 1 hr and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 24

Given up for adoption by his mother at only a few weeks old, Robert Black is placed with physically abusive foster parents, setting the tone for who, and what, he'd become - a pedophile and serial killer. Starting at the age of five, he recalls being sexually curious and began placing items in his anus at the age of eight. He'd sexually assault hundreds of little girls before committing his first murder.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • it sucks boring worst book I have had so far.

  • By PC Steve on 09-01-18

Hard to listen to

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-16

The narrator was terrible with his sing song voice and evidently not stopping at commas or stopping in the middle of a sentence to catch his breath. I hung in there because the topic was interesting.

  • The Glass Castle

  • A Memoir
  • By: Jeannette Walls
  • Narrated by: Jeannette Walls
  • Length: 10 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,970
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,533
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,552

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children's imagination. Rose Mary painted and wrote and couldn't stand the responsibility of providing for her family; she called herself an "excitement addict."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A CAPTIVATING READ

  • By Jennifer on 09-25-12

Kept my interest

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-16

Everybody's got a story, and some worse than this but it's always nice when someone allows you to get a glimpse into their unique lives.

  • The Worst Hard Time

  • The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
  • By: Timothy Egan
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor, Ken Burns (introduction)
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,014
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,266
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,277

The dust storms that terrorized America's High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since, and the stories of the people that held on have never been fully told. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist and author Timothy Egan follows a half-dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of the region.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Fascinating History

  • By Sara on 02-02-14

terrible

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-16

I couldn't even get through the first two chapters. I'll never get that time back.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful