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Wandering Hoosier

  • 20
  • reviews
  • 41
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • Career of Evil

  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 17 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,935
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,066
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,014

Audie Award, Mystery, 2016. When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman's severed leg. Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible - and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Characters Mean Everything

  • By Charles Atkinson on 11-09-15

Fantastic Narrator & Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I really enjoyed the 3 Robert Galbraith CB Strike Novels that I read. This particular one is interesting as the main characters are actually the targets in this book. We learn a lot about Strike as the book unfolds.

I've tried watching the television story made after the three books and warn against doing that. The television series does not follow the books well. None of the character depth conveyed in the books comes out in the televised format.

I highly recommend this book--the novel as well as the narrator are great!

  • The Good Girl

  • By: Mary Kubica
  • Narrated by: Lindy Nettleton, Johnny Heller, Tom Taylorson, and others
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15,281
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13,610
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,603

Born to a prominent Chicago judge and his stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, Colin Thatcher seems at first like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant performances, moving story

  • By Roger on 09-11-14

Loved the Book, Loved the Narrators

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-19-16

Gripping from the beginning to the end. Kept me thinking. Great character development. Equal in quality to "The Life We Bury."

The narrators were fantastic. Just perfect. So glad that I listened to the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Life We Bury

  • By: Allen Eskens
  • Narrated by: Zach Villa
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,330
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,873
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,791

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran-and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good listen!

  • By Lori on 12-14-15

FABULOUS!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-16

I can't say enough good things about this book. I couldn't stop listening to the book. Both the narrator and the book were fantastic! The plot line was unique and interesting. The characters were extremely well developed. The ending--while a bit predictable--left me feeling satisfied. I highly recommend the book!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Silent Sister

  • By: Diane Chamberlain
  • Narrated by: Susan Bennett
  • Length: 11 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,525
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,496
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,480

In The Silent Sister, Riley MacPherson has spent her entire life believing that her older sister Lisa committed suicide as a teenager. Now, over twenty years later, her father has passed away and she's in New Bern, North Carolina cleaning out his house when she finds evidence to the contrary. Lisa is alive. Alive and living under a new identity. But why exactly was she on the run all those years ago, and what secrets are being kept now?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • I can't think of anything more predictable...

  • By Carol-Ann on 04-09-15

I had to listen to it at 1.25 speed.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-16

Wow, was I disappointed by this book. The characters were simplistic and predictable. I wanted to listen to the entire book since it got such high reviews. So I listened to it at a faster pace. The author introduced a brother with PTSD, a lesbian relationship, and other plot lines to make the book more interesting. But none of the plot lines were developed enough to give them any depth. The characters were entirely predictable and none of them seemed realistic.

  • Orphan Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Christina Baker Kline
  • Narrated by: Jessica Almasy, Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,387
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,375
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,387

Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to "aging out" out of the foster care system. A community-service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse.... As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Moving story of sharing and transformation.

  • By Kathi on 04-03-13

Disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-16

I expected this book to be very interesting--based on all the high reviews. But I found the characters quite simple and the ending extremely predictable. While I enjoyed learning about the orphan train and it broke my heart to hear about Vivian's childhood, I thought the author's simplistic writing style caused the book to lack depth. Perhaps if I hadn't expected so much from the book, I would have liked it more.

  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid

  • By: Jeff Kinney
  • Narrated by: Ramon De Ocampo
  • Length: 1 hr and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,428
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,059
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,062

Sixth grader Greg Heffley doesn't understand his annoying younger brother, obnoxious older one, or well-meaning parents. But he knows enough to record his daily thoughts in a manly journal - not some girly diary. In a unique novel brimming with laugh-out-loud moments, Greg chronicles his first turbulent year of middle school.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • You need the cartoons!

  • By Catherine on 04-17-08

Kids Love It!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-15

Great narration! Funny book. Perfect for elementary school children. This is a must have for that age group.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Three Wishes

  • By: Liane Moriarty
  • Narrated by: Heather Wilds
  • Length: 11 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,838
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,329
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,317

In this wise, witty, hilarious new novel, we follow the Kettle sisters through their 33rd year, as they struggle to survive their divorced parents' dating each other, their technologically savvy grandmother, a cheating husband, champagne hangovers, and the fabulous, frustrating life of forever being part of a threesome.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bring back Caroline Lee or Tamara Lovatt-Smith

  • By carolyn on 09-07-14

Not "Big Little Lies"

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-15

I'd previously listened to "Big Little Lies," so I had high expectations for this book. However, this book didn't meet my expectations.

"Three Wishes" tells the story of triplet sisters. They're in their early thirties and remain best friends. We begin the book by learning about Cat's wonderful marriaingge to Dan. Except it isn't so wonderful--they can't conceive and Dan has a girlfriend. We learn about Jama's non-commital nature. Except she finds herself pregnant and tries to find her way through that situation. And then there's Lynne, who has an ideal husband, step-daughter, and daughter of her own. Lynne also runs a profitable business.

Lynne's existence--except for her panic attacks--is glorified, but the other sisters must live in her shadow. Lynne, in fact, "stole" her husband away from a previous wife, so I'm not sure why Liane Moriarty makes Lynne into a seemingly harmless character. Further, I don't see why its so surprising that Dan cheats on Cat and leaves Cat for his mistress--considering that Lynne did the same to her husband's ex wife.

The book has interesting periods and rather good character development. But it seems to get stuck in Cat's misery. In fact, the book at half the length would have been better.

I liked the narrator. She did a great job for female voices, but her male voices weren't quite as good. I especially didn't care for the voice she used for Lynne's husband. Overall, though, I'd definitely listen to another book by Heather Wilds.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

  • By: Nadia Hashimi
  • Narrated by: Gin Hammond
  • Length: 16 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,066
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 961
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 967

Nadia Hashimi's literary debut is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Lisa See. In Kabul, 2007, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inner View of Hidden Women

  • By SydSavvy on 01-04-15

Interesting--But Very Disturbing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-15

Would you listen to The Pearl That Broke Its Shell again? Why?

I would listen to the book again, but I'm glad that I listened to it the first time. I'm still shocked by the horrible way that the Afghani men can treat their wives and women in general. But yet the wives have no voice and are presumed guilty.

It saddens me that women who may not have even hit puberty are married off. Women--or rather girls--are bartered for opium and livestock. And women are at the complete mercy of their husbands.

I learned about the Afghani culture and many Islamic traditions and customs. The book was even more eye-opening and disturbing than the "Kite Runner" genre of books. But it's a book that everyone should either read or listen to and hopefully someone will be able to stop the atrocities still happening today to countless women.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

The ending became more and more predictable as the book went on. I hadn't realized for most of the book that the two female main characters were supposed to be grandmother/great-grandmother and granddaughter. It actually seemed as if the two women were living at the same time. When I realized that the two main characters were living years apart, I found it sad that the plight of women in Afghanistan didn't seem to change during the generations.

What three words best describe Gin Hammond’s performance?

Hammond did a nice job. She isn't my favorite author, but I didn't mind her voice.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I found the first few hours of the book to be very boring. Then it picked up for the next few hours. For the last five hours I couldn't stop listening--so I listened to the last part in one setting.

  • The Paris Architect

  • By: Charles Belfoure
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,319
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,138
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,134

Like most gentiles in Nazi-occupied Paris, architect Lucien Bernard has little empathy for the Jews. So when a wealthy industrialist offers him a large sum of money to devise secret hiding places for Jews, Lucien struggles with the choice of risking his life for a cause he doesn't really believe in. Ultimately he can't resist the challenge and begins designing expertly concealed hiding spaces - behind a painting, within a column, or inside a drainpipe - detecting possibilities invisible to the average eye. But when one of his clever hiding spaces fails and the immense suffering of Jews becomes incredibly personal, he can no longer deny reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting

  • By C. B. Schindel on 08-23-15

Absolutely Wonderful!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-15

I couldn't stop listening to the book. I've read and listened to many Nazi-era books and find this to be one of the best. In fact, anyone who likes Sarah's Key or Those Who Saved Us will also love this one.

The premise of the book--saving Jews in architecturally designed structures--is intriguing. The author somehow balanced the horrors of the era with happiness. His characters conveyed the best and worst parts of people. Paris and all its glory played a strong part in the book.

I found the author fabulous! He added to the quality of the book do I'm glad I listened to it rather than read it. He did a great job with different genders, ages, and nationalities.

I loved this book so much that I'm sad it has ended!

32 of 34 people found this review helpful

  • Rashi

  • By: Elie Wiesel
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

From Elie Wiesel, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, comes a magical audio book that introduces us to the towering figure of Rashi—Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki—the great biblical and Talmudic commentator of the Middle Ages. Wiesel brilliantly evokes the world of medieval European Jewry, a world of profound scholars and closed communities ravaged by outbursts of anti-Semitism and decimated by the Crusades.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Non-Fiction Overview of Rashi

  • By Wandering Hoosier on 04-30-15

Non-Fiction Overview of Rashi

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-15

I had high expectations for the book, being that Arlie Wiesel wrote it. My expectations met with disappointment.

The book gives such a high level overview of Rashi that it almost teaches nothing. I get from the book that Wiesel--as do many others--find Rashi brilliant. But nothing from the book confirmed this. In fact, I'd only recommend this book to a Rashi scholar who might possibly find a worthwhile nugget of information in it.

I liked the narrator's voice. He spoke in a soothing tone, but his tone made me sleepy. I wish that he would have used his voice to add to the narration if possible--rather than just simply read the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful