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Randy

Coraopolis, PA, USA
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  • 10
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  • 2
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  • The Secret of How to Ace any Job Interview with Confidence!

  • By: David R. Portney
  • Narrated by: David R. Portney
  • Length: 55 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 8

Let me guide you step-by-step as I reveal important do's and don'ts based on my 20 years of experience as a hiring manager. I'll give you real-world practical tips and information so you stand out from the crowd and get noticed, a must in today's tough job market!

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Skip this one - no stars

  • By Pat on 09-29-06

Skip this one

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-07

The audacity of this author to include the word “book” in the description of this meager effort, as in “Audio-book,” is absurd and an insult to anyone even slightly engaged in a writing vocation. Its silly tone and elementary content may be appropriate for teenagers looking for their first part time job, but is severely inadequate for anyone seeking employment beyond the level of a fast food establishment, let alone career advancement in a profession. If paid a single dollar for every instance the author slovenly invoked the word “confident,” the need to change careers would be removed from my current list of requisite and unpleasant tasks, as I would be independently wealthy. Number one: dress well for the interview – thanks for the tip. Do not waste your time on this one.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

The World Is Flat audiobook cover art
  • The World Is Flat

  • A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century, Updated and Expanded
  • By: Thomas L. Friedman
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 41 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 162
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

Friedman brilliantly demystifies the new flat world for listeners, allowing them to make sense of the advances in technology and communications that are creating an explosion of wealth in India and China, and challenging the rest of us to run even faster just to stay in place. For this updated and expanded edition, Friedman has provided more than five hours of new reporting and commentary, bringing fresh stories and insights to help us understand the flattening of the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worth reading

  • By Magikarp Salad on 09-21-06

Nothing but engineers and computer scientists?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-06

Recommendation: do not bother - unless you want to feel inadequate because you do not have a post doctorate degree or cannot design and install a large commercial IT system in your spare time. Even if we do not realize it, computers and information technology are more a part of all our lives than ever before. Such is the nature of ever-expanding technology. But to conclude that even if we provide our children with an excellent education in another field, absent a PhD in computer science or something analogous - they will not be able to find gainful employment in the ?flat world? is simplistic and, to my mind, absurd. Exponential growth in granting common business, liberal arts, and even law degrees has taken its toll via the unbalanced capacity of our under-graduate and even graduate prospective work force. This trend is problematic and a considerable shift in the other direction toward the sciences would be prudent. Here is the book?s most aggravating conclusion: The author implies, but does not put into words, a dooms-day scenario that without science or computer expertise at its core, every education curriculum will be sub par. Even more problematical is taking a foreign company?s CEO at his word, when his company?s agenda is to usurp the career, vocation, and lifestyle of the average American. Our economy is much more complex and diverse than that of China or India. It is too one-dimensional not to consider this key element in any analogy between our respective labor forces and economies. Has anyone recently read all the documentation that came with your latest PC purchase, including the technical manual for Windows? XP that cannot be feasibly printed and shipped with the hardware because it is too bulky and expensive? God help us all, even the well educated, if conclusions drawn in this book prove correct.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful