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Sherri

Guildford, Australia
  • 22
  • reviews
  • 102
  • helpful votes
  • 73
  • ratings
  • The Never-Open Desert Diner

  • A Novel
  • By: James Anderson
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 76

Ben Jones lives a quiet, hardscrabble life, working as a trucker on Route 117, a little-travelled road in a remote region of the Utah desert that serves as a haven for fugitives and others looking to hide from the world. For many of the desert's inhabitants, Ben's visits are their only contact with the outside world, and the only landmark worth noting is a once-famous roadside diner that hasn't opened in years.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The desert drags you in

  • By Sherri on 04-16-16

The desert drags you in

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-16

If, like me you enjoy books where the landscape is a main character, line up for this one. The story of Ben Jones unfolds gradually, the action happening on the long desert highway stealthily takes hold and the narrator is masterful. But it's the desert that holds you in its grip from start to end. It's all about the light. Very satisfying read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

  • By: John Irving
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,787
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,393
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,397

Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Painfully nostalgic

  • By Barry on 07-29-15

Gave me the SHIVERS - in good way.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-14

Ah Owen Meany. I still think it's one of the best books ever written and this superb audio treatment does it justice. Joe Barrett brilliantly captures 'the voice' - such kudos to him for this read. I hope he wins an award for it. If you've read and enjoyed Owen Meany, then you simply must listen to this. If you haven't, I'm jealous. You have a wonderful experience still ahead of you.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Mambo in Chinatown

  • By: Jean Kwok
  • Narrated by: Angela Lin
  • Length: 12 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 74
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 68

Twenty-two-year-old Charlie Wong grew up in New York's Chinatown, the older daughter of a Beijing ballerina and a noodle maker. Though an ABC (America-born Chinese), Charlie's entire world has been limited to this small area. Now grown, she lives in the same tiny apartment with her widower father and her 11-year-old sister, and works - miserably - as a dishwasher. But when she lands a job as a receptionist at a ballroom dance studio, Charlie gains access to a world she hardly knew exis.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Quick steps into your heart

  • By Sherri on 12-05-14

Quick steps into your heart

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-14

This is a wonderful book. It's a light read yet covers some big themes and handles these with deft footwork. I enjoyed the insight into the immigrant life and how difficult it can be, especially for the children of parents still tied to the old ways. Our heroine has great character and we are for her every inch of the way. It's a very satisfying and rewarding read and a special mention for the narrator, Angela Lin. Great job.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • More Fool Me

  • By: Stephen Fry
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 145

Following on from his hugely successful books, Moab is My Washpot and The Fry Chronicles, comes the third chapter in Stephen Fry's life. This unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of More Fool Me is performed by Stephen Fry himself.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • And more fool me for buying it.

  • By Sherri on 11-30-14

And more fool me for buying it.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-14

I'm a fan of Stephen Fry and really enjoyed the first two volumes of his autobiography but this was a huge disappointment. He phoned it in. The majority of the book is spent bringing us up to date - OK, I understand the need to go over old ground - and reading from the diary he kept as he rushed madly around London snorting coke and hanging out with nearly every name he could possibly drop (not those he was sharing his coke with of course, that would be beyond the pale). This book doesn't advance us very far through his life and although he obviously had a serious drug habit we don't get the sense of how this was affecting his everyday life. The diary entries don't cut it. Pardon the pun.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Heartburn

  • By: Nora Ephron
  • Narrated by: Meryl Streep
  • Length: 5 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,323
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,113
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,101

Is it possible to write a sidesplitting novel about the breakup of the perfect marriage? If the writer is Nora Ephron, the answer is a resounding yes. For in this inspired confection of adultery, revenge, group therapy, and pot roast, the creator of Sleepless in Seattle reminds us that comedy depends on anguish as surely as a proper gravy depends on flour and butter.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just a treasure

  • By David Shear on 07-10-13

Nora Ephron and Meryl Streep. What could go wrong?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-13

Oh I love this book. I loved it when I first read it many years ago and I love it more now I've listened to Meryl Streep run down the steps so beautifully placed there by the writer, Nora Ephron. Even though it's fictionalised, it's pretty much a memoir from the time she was married to Watergate journalist, Carl Bernstein and even though it's gaspingly hurtful (for her) it's also hilarious (for us). Meryl is of course magnificent. I remember thinking what a wonderful character the mother was before realising - yep, still Meryl. Brilliant narrator, great writer and a very successful book. Do yourself a favour and head to the cart.

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • I'd Rather Be in Philadelphia

  • An Amanda Pepper Mystery, Book 3
  • By: Gillian Roberts
  • Narrated by: Susan Denaker
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

Book three in the Anthony Award-winning mystery series featuring Amanda Pepper, the resourceful English teacher at Philly Prep. Amanda is sorting books for a school fundraiser, when she comes across a book for battered women that contains a special and frightening message from its original, anonymous owner. Desperate to learn who donated the books, Amanda's search leads her to deliberate brutality and its cold-blooded consequences.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • "she's game, but thick as two short planks"

  • By Sherri on 09-06-13

"she's game, but thick as two short planks"

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-13

An interesting idea for a story but the main character is as dumb as a box of rocks. She's brave, some would say foolhardy and there are a few scattered references to her beauty but you know very early on she's not the brightest bulb in the chandelier...and we're stuck with her. The action is nice but the journey is painful. How many more metaphors can I come up with I hear you wonder? Well, let's put it this way. She's game, but as thick as two short planks.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Nightmare

  • By: Lars Kepler
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 15 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

The chilling phenomenon begins again. On a summer night the dead body of a woman is found on board an abandoned pleasure boat drifting around in the Stockholm archipelago. Her lungs are filled with brackish water, but there are no traces of this water on her clothes or other parts of her body. Detective Inspector Joona Linna takes up the case. Forensics state that it was a simple drowning, that she must have been pulled aboard the boat which explains the lack of brackish water.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly entertaining

  • By jackson on 11-17-12

"I suppose the the title held a clue"

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-13

I love my Scandinavian crime but had a to drop out of this one before the end.
Great main character, perfectly narrated by the master but too violent, too many extra characters introduced just so they could be tortured or done away with - too much Mr Kepler. It actually reduces the tension and increases the eye rolling. I suppose the title held a clue. Should have paid more attention.

  • A Slight Trick of the Mind

  • By: Mitch Cullin
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 7 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 160
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 161

He's 93-years-old, in retirement in Sussex, beginning to lose his memory, and subject to emotions he has resisted all his life. His name is Sherlock Holmes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth more than five stars!

  • By Jennifer on 08-23-05

Sherlock hits the skids.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-12

A beautiful study of the effects of ageing on a powerful mind - quite brilliant from that point of view. However the story is very dull. Drumming fingers on the table dull.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Woman in White

  • By: Wilkie Collins
  • Narrated by: Josephine Bailey, Simon Prebble
  • Length: 25 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,057
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,751
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,764

One of the greatest mystery thrillers ever written, Wilkie Collins's The Woman in White was a phenomenal best seller in the 1860s, achieving even greater success than works by Charles Dickens. Full of surprise, intrigue, and suspense, this vastly entertaining novel continues to enthrall audiences today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping novel, excellent production

  • By David on 01-18-11

She's been and gone.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-12

A phenomenal best seller in its day, this book is engaging as a great example of the behaviour of the era. Very well written and retains enough mystery to attach to it but the inability of the women at the centre of the story to cope emotionally with the ongoing dramas was thoroughly annoying. Falling about with the vapours was obviously an accepted reaction in those days, doesn't wash now.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Istanbul Passage

  • A Novel
  • By: Joseph Kanon
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 14 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 416
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 342
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 344

A neutral capital straddling Europe and Asia, Istanbul has spent the war as a magnet for refugees and spies. Even American businessman Leon Bauer has been drawn into this shadow world, doing undercover odd jobs and courier runs for the Allied war effort. Now, as the espionage community begins to pack up and an apprehensive city prepares for the grim realities of postwar life, he is given one more assignment, a routine job that goes fatally wrong, plunging him into a tangle of intrigue and moral confusion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Terrific story!

  • By Edwin Williamson on 06-21-12

Don't miss the boat.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-12

The attention to detail is a feature of this great book. Joseph Kanon is a wonderful writer who's put together a thoughtful thriller set in a fascinating city during a turbulent time. I notice other reviews have quibbled about the narration -they're crackers, it's masterful.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful