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  • reviews
  • 40
  • helpful votes
  • 119
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  • Kill Process

  • By: William Hertling
  • Narrated by: Jane Cramer
  • Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 800
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 732
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 734

By day, Angie, a 20-year veteran of the tech industry, is a data analyst at Tomo, the world's largest social networking company; by night, she exploits her database access to profile domestic abusers and kill the worst of them. She can't change her own traumatic past, but she can save other women. When Tomo introduces a deceptive new product that preys on users' fears to drive up its own revenue, Angie sees Tomo for what it really is - another evil abuser.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great on Many Levels

  • By Carl on 07-20-16

Just as Good as Other Reviews State!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-18

It may have even been better than professed by other reviewers! Everything surrounding computer security and the lack of privacy today, this book illustrates in great detail. This was published back in '16, yet sounds like it was written from recent headlines [concerning Fb]. And Hertling doesn't just settle on the current state of security, but takes the reader on a hacking journey throughout the past three decades.

I also loved the programming aspects. This may be the first book I've heard incorporate Git repos and actual SQL queries -- alongside Raspberry Pis, [a comprised] Tor, and Doxxing -- into well-flowing fiction. This scratches that itch that Mr. Robot can't reach in being confined to an hour! Even the introverted tendencies and Angie's thoughts towards therapy are spot on! I'm actually tempted to re-listen before moving on to another of his works, or anything else for that matter. Keep it coming, Hertling!

My only criticism was the narrator, who I first thought was a computer-generated voice; that's just how stiffly she started off. She pulled it together with the other female leads and Angie's exasperations, but it was often difficult to tell who was speaking when a male was present.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Family Business

  • By: Carl Weber, Eric Pete
  • Narrated by: Ezra Knight, Patricia R. Floyd, Michael Early
  • Length: 12 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,423
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,241

New York Times best-selling author Carl Weber and award-winning novelist Eric Pete team up to deliver the first in a much-anticipated new trilogy. The Family Business features two times the heat, two times the fun, and two times the drama as the members of an unforgettable family (not to mention their lovers and hangers-on) find their way in and out of trouble. As their many fans will attest, Weber and Pete share a talent for penning juicy fiction that their audience can’t get enough of.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The story unfolds

  • By Dream on 03-26-12

Porn, with a Better Storyline

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-17

I would've enjoyed this a lot more if every scene didn't seem like a build-up towards GRATUITOUS sex. The other reviewers were right: when the characters weren't having sex, they were thinking about it, talking about it, or bragging about it. And these scenes seemed to go on forever, lasting up to 3 minutes. One might think this were written by a pubescent middle-schooler.

Aside from the detailed sexuality, the book has a very engaging plot. The writing isn't anything special, but it's not bad. It may actually be pretty good, but it was detracted by the abhorrent reading. The women had the tone of your stereotypical, neck-rolling female, and when the men read, you could barely discern voices between any characters within the same ethnicity. Harris's reading was the worst offender, but LC's reading did remind me a bit of Keith David.

While I enjoyed the tale, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who isn't an avid fan of internet porn. That "in your face" (pun intended) brashness is what you're going to get with this novel. I got this free during a sale, so it's no love lost. And I wish I could read another, but I'm not willing to trudge through that mess, or narration, again.

  • Dark Matter

  • A Novel
  • By: Blake Crouch
  • Narrated by: Jon Lindstrom
  • Length: 10 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,426
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,017
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,019

"Are you happy with your life?" Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason's never met smiles down at him and says, "Welcome back, my friend."

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Schrödinger's box gets opened. Meh steps out.

  • By Darwin8u on 09-19-16

Too Similar to 'The Fold'

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-16

I was bored throughout most this book since it was pretty much the same premise as Peter Clines's, 'The Fold'; so much that I was going to return it. However, it steps out on its own and gets interesting in the last 3 or 4 hours of the book. If you've never read, 'The Fold' then this book will probably garner 4 or 5 stars from you. I doubt I'll ever listen to it again, but it wasn't a complete disappointment.

  • I'm Feeling Lucky

  • The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59
  • By: Douglas Edwards
  • Narrated by: Douglas Edwards
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,486
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,232
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,227

Comparing Google to an ordinary business is like comparing a rocket to an Edsel. No academic analysis or bystanders account can capture it. Now Doug Edwards, Employee Number 59, offers the first inside view of Google, giving readers a chance to fully experience the bizarre mix of camaraderie and competition at this phenomenal company. I'm Feeling Lucky captures for the first time the unique, self-invented, yet profoundly important culture of the world's most transformative corporation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely worth a credit

  • By Stephen on 07-20-11

Good Narrative, Horrible Performance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-16

Good, interesting first-hand insight on the inner-workings and struggles of Google in their early years. However, the author/narrator's cadence and affectations are unbearable. He adds SO... MUCH... EMPHASIS... and so many pauses... in nearly EVERY... sentence... that I had to LISTEN... at 1.25X speed... JUST to make sure... I finished the book. I would've enjoyed it a lot more reading it for myself.

  • The Kind Worth Killing

  • By: Peter Swanson
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller, Karen White, Kathleen Early, and others
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,782
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,656
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,640

On a night flight from London to Boston, Ted Severson meets the stunning and mysterious Lily Kintner. Sharing one too many martinis, the strangers begin to play a game of truth, revealing very intimate details about themselves. Ted talks about his marriage that's going stale and his wife, Miranda, who he's sure is cheating on him. Ted and his wife were a mismatch from the start - he the rich businessman, she the artistic free spirit - a contrast that once inflamed their passion but has now become a cliché.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfection!

  • By DCinMI on 08-29-15

Predictable, yet Surprising!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-15

While I did guess the plot (and even that was a shot in the dark), the story always threw curve balls that I didn't see coming. The characters are believable and Swanson gives us excellent exposition into their lives; I actually enjoyed the chapters spent in Lily's past more than the present. I also appreciated how the characters' inner-monologues often alluded to what "would" be predictable, just to keep us on our toes. The ending (i.e. final paragraphs) was perfect.

My only complaint was with Miranda's narrator. She always began with a fake, breathy voice that [thankfully] never held up past the first few paragraphs. Ted's narrator (the guy on the sample) was a bit annoying as well since he constantly spoke both characters' dialogues in the same breath. And with his male and female voices sounding so similar, it was often difficult to determine who said what. Lily's narrator outranked them all by far.

  • The Killer Next Door

  • By: Alex Marwood
  • Narrated by: Imogen Church
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,171
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,858
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,846

Everyone who lives at 23 Beulah Grove has a secret. If they didn't, they wouldn't be renting rooms in a dodgy old building for cash - no credit check, no lease. It's the kind of place you end up when you you've run out of other options.The six residents mostly keep to themselves, but one unbearably hot summer night, a terrible accident pushes them into an uneasy alliance. What they don't know is that one of them is a killer. He's already chosen his next victim, and he'll do anything to protect his secret.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible--but not for the faint of heart

  • By Lesley on 01-11-15

Eh...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-15

It was "okay", didn't really hold my interest though and the ending was poor IMO. There were points that were engaging, but the scenes seemed to jump around and the lack of descriptive detail often made it hard to envision what was happening, or even how the house was set up. I couldn't tell you who was on which floor outside of Vesta and G. Bright. This was an Audible recommendation after "The Girl on the Train", so maybe my expectations were just a bit too high.

  • Light of the World

  • A Dave Robicheaux Novel, Book 20
  • By: James Lee Burke
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,957
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,941

In Light of the World, sadist and serial killer Asa Surrette narrowly escaped the death penalty for the string of heinous murders. But following a series of damning articles written by Dave Robicheaux’s daughter Alafair about possible other crimes committed by Surette, the killer escapes from a prison transport van and heads to Montana - where an unsuspecting Dave happens to have gone to take in the sweet summer air, accompanied by Alafair, his wife Molly, faithful partner Clete, and Clete’s newfound daughter, Gretchen Horowitz.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Burke is still the best

  • By Dave on 08-08-13

What Happened to Patton's Voice

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-14

I listened to this a few months ago, but wasn't impressed. Loved the previous works that I've heard, especially Will Patton's narration, but there was a drastic change in the voices in this recording, particularly with Gretchen and Clete. I wasn't too captivated with the storyline either. Like others have mentioned, I think Burke's description and cadence are impeccable, but he could've trimmed the fat on this one. When it was all over, it seemed like nothing really happened for the amount of time invested. I also see the formulaic pattern that others are complaining about, but what do you expect? I often chide others who watch Law & Order, Criminal Minds, for the same reason, but we all know there's nothing new under the sun, only different ways of presenting it. I think Burke does a good job in handling the detective plot line, however, reviewer Mike (10/24/13) nailed it on the head; it would be nice to see him shake things up a little.

  • Snow White Must Die

  • By: Nele Neuhaus
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 15 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,227
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,962
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,962

On a rainy November day, police detectives Pia Kirchhoff and Oliver von Bodenstein are summoned to a mysterious traffic accident: a woman has fallen from a pedestrian bridge onto a car driving underneath. According to a witness, the woman may have been pushed. The investigation leads Pia and Oliver to a small village, and the home of the victim, Rita Cramer. On a September evening eleven years earlier, two seventeen-year-old girls vanished from the village without a trace.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great narrator, unbelievable, never-ending story

  • By C. Vincent on 01-27-13

If I Heard, 'In a lurch,' ONE MORE TIME....

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-13

*Exasperated sigh* What a tedious listen. As soon as the mystery starts to get interesting, the author drops the mysterious element by revealing the villains/conspirators, then attempts to throw the reader off again by introducing another problem/mystery, then another, then another, then another, to the point that you no longer care who did what, you just want the book to end. It also seemed poorly written, repeating various words and phrases: EVERYONE in this book was in danger of being left, "In a lurch," by one character or another. Like others, I figure some things may have been lost in translation, but "1Q84" fared reasonably well. There could've been so much more done with the premise, the characters, and the motives, but it never came to fruition. There were also beau-coup characters, and the poor narration made for a confusing, indistinguishable listen. I'm glad I got this one on sale, otherwise, I'd ask for a refund.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Broken Harbor

  • Dublin Murder Squad, Book 4
  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 19 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,717
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,690

In Broken Harbor, all but one member of the Spain family lies dead, and it’s up to Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy to find out why. Mick must piece together why their house is full of cameras pointed at holes in the walls and how a nighttime intruder bypassed all the locks. Meanwhile, the town of Broken Harbor holds something else for Mick: disturbing memories of a childhood summer gone terribly wrong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best in the Series

  • By sara miller on 07-29-12

A 19 Hour Episode of 'Law and Order'

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-13

It was a nicely written, intriguing story that never took off. I kept waiting for something to happen, but my title says it all: 19 hours of two detectives interviewing others and talking amongst themselves, trying to figure out a murder. But unlike "Law and Order" -- which I don't care for, anyway -- you don't even get to enjoy the setup action of the murder; the book just drops you in its aftermath. It was, however, written well-enough to hold my attention and make me *think* something was afoot, but it fell flat in the end... And not even in the end, about 3/4 of the way through. As another reviewer said, it was entirely too long. The revelation of the case took an hour to explain, and even then, there was still about an hour left of the audiobook. I'd had enough by the end of book 2 of 3. I'm used to the John Sanford, James Lee Burke police/detective stories, so I was clearly out of my element on this one. But if you're intrigued and entertained by the slow, methodical, true-to-life, no-filler, painstaking detective work, this may be your book. The only upside was the terrific, Irish-accented narration.

  • The Racketeer

  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: J.D. Jackson
  • Length: 12 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,344
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,343
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,331

Given the importance of what they do, and the controversies that often surround them, and the violent people they sometimes confront, it is remarkable that in the history of this country only four active federal judges have been murdered. Judge Raymond Fawcett has just become number five.... Nothing is as it seems and everything’s fair game in this wickedly clever new novel from John Grisham, the undisputed master of the legal thriller.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Enjoyable Grisham

  • By Ron on 10-25-12

Who Wrote This Awfully Boring Book???!!!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-13

Is Grisham passing on someone else's work under his established name? This book lacked suspense, likeable characters, and everything just magically flowed along without any real hurdles. What a horrible waste of a credit. I grabbed the Racketeer -- like many others -- after seeing a few of the "Grisham is back" reviews, but if they think he's back, they must've been lost along with him.

The narrator also added to the misery by dragging out his speech in an attempt to add emphasis to a drab work. I had to listen at a faster rate just to make it bearable. He also makes it hard to articulate narration from dialogue, or determine exactly who is speaking since many characters share a similar voice. This is not a problem for the first 2 hours of the book, however, as there is only about 10 lines of dialogue. Just blatant, nondescriptive text that only serves the purpose of moving the book into the third quarter as quickly as possible.

I really enjoyed my last Grisham listen, "The Street Lawyer", but am regretting having wasted the little time I have for audiobooks on "The Racketeer". And as others have mentioned, the author note at the end is a slap in the face. He practically admits that he simply threw this piece of junk together without any: "research", which was, "hardly a priority", "accuracy", which was "not deemed crucial", or inspiration. And for whatever reason, he actually felt the need to state, "Long paragraphs of fiction were used to avoid looking up facts." What a politely, nonchalant F-U to faithful fans. I wish that note had been at the beginning of the book so I wouldn't have wasted my time. Return or Retire.