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Lane Willson

Knoxville, TN United States
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 38
  • ratings
  • MASH

  • A Novel About Three Army Doctors
  • By: Richard Hooker
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller
  • Length: 5 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,747
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,597
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,595

Before the movie, this is the novel that gave life to Hawkeye Pierce, Trapper John, Hot Lips Houlihan, Frank Burns, Radar O'Reilly, and the rest of the gang that made the 4077th MASH like no other place in Korea or on earth. The doctors who worked in the Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals (MASH) during the Korean War were well trained but, like most soldiers sent to fight a war, too young for the job. In the words of the author, "a few flipped their lids, but most of them just raised hell, in a variety of ways and degrees."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Wanted to Love it--and I DID!!

  • By Trish on 02-28-14

The Finest Kind

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-18

I am a huge fan of both the movie and television version of Richard Hooker’s novel and I can’t believe I waited so long to read the original inspiration. I loved it!

  • The Recovering

  • By: Leslie Jamison
  • Narrated by: Author
  • Length: 16 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 225

With its deeply personal and seamless blend of memoir, cultural history, literary criticism, and reportage, The Recovering turns our understanding of the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself. Leslie Jamison deftly excavates the stories we tell about addiction - both her own and others' - and examines what we want these stories to do and what happens when they fail us. All the while, she offers a fascinating look at the larger history of the recovery movement and at the complicated bearing that race and class have on our understanding of who is criminal and who is ill.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Strong writing

  • By Anneke M. Post on 05-11-18

I Like Drunk-A-Logs Too

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-18

I like drunk-a-logs too. The Recovering: Intoxication and its Aftermath, is far more than just Leslie Jamison’s 80 proof telling of adventures and misadventures. Her writing, especially early on, sings with a flourish reminiscent of an Irish pub. She takes the reader to that magical place, known well to alcoholics, where the warmth of euphoria melts away all awkwardness and self-conscious doubt and makes each experience, each story, a brilliant shining well-told jewel. However, she does not shy away from the cold unyielding degradation and humiliation that so often follow in alcohol’s wake.

Woven into her tale of becoming a writer and an alcoholic, are the stories of others who proceeded her on this path of dual vocation. John Berryman, Charles Jackson, Raymond Carver and Dennis Johnson are but a few of the writers Jamison uses to contrast her own journey and mark the history of writing’s long partnership with the intoxicating muse.

For many, the turn towards the end of drinking begins with the self-bartering and attempts to prove that no problem exists. I’ll only drink wine or beer, I won’t drink before or after some imaginary signpost. Then the investigation for evidence to prove no that there is no collusion between the drinker and liquor. Jamison’s writing changes to match this aspect of the coming darkness of dependence.

Hesitancy, fear, the premonition that some of the things and people most important to us might fall away, are all present as Jamison writes about her early recovery, relapse, and return to sobriety. I especially enjoyed, as it reminded me of my own early days in recovery, the slow trembling into the unknown of sobriety and serenity. There is often new bravado created by a few weeks without a drink that leads one to, like a child confident they can pour their own milk, make a complete mess of things.

Jamison’s honest description of her “what it was like, what happened, and what it is like now,” is masterfully used to shine the light on the experiences of so many who have battled addiction, especially writers, and stands as one more lighthouse for those still suffering addicts and alcoholics. We can never have too many because even those of us who have stayed clean and sober, a day at a time need them no less than those seeking their first breath of freedom from addiction’s suffocation.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • A Higher Loyalty

  • Truth, Lies, and Leadership
  • By: James Comey
  • Narrated by: James Comey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 21,790
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,886
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 19,795

In his audiobook, A Higher Loyalty, former FBI director James Comey shares his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government, exploring what good, ethical leadership looks like and how it drives sound decisions. His journey provides an unprecedented entry into the corridors of powe, and a remarkable lesson in what makes an effective leader.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More Than Trump: All Comey's Life/Working Years--

  • By Gillian on 04-17-18

A Memo about My Encounter with The Director

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

This isn’t so much a review of James Comey’s Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership as a memo of understanding, a way of preserving my key thoughts from the narrative.

1. Director Comey is a far better writer than I anticipated. I imagined his style would be perilously close to the cold methodical detailed writing forged in nearly four decades of law enforcement. As the narrator of his own book, I had the audiobook version, his voice may have offered emotional enhancement not offered by typeface alone.

2. Director screwed-up the handling two major investigations connected to the Presidential election of 2016 fourteen ways to Thursday. His desire to protect the impartiality of the Justice Department and FBI was a noble goal, but his effort achieved the opposite.

3. Comey will make a fine grandmother one day. Moralistic, prudish, and suspicious, at times Comey appears to be a cross between Aunt Bea and Inspector Javert. To be fair, he doesn’t play favorites and Democrat and Republican alike are possibly Jean Valjean.

4. Despite these shortcomings, Comey seems by my reckoning to be dedicated to the worth and equality of the individual, and the fair and honest treatment of all.

5. Our democracy is in a dangerous place where our leaders seek to prove the criminal incompetence and conspiracy of their political opponents rather than promoting the noble principles from across the political spectrum that has secured freedom for millions and built a great republic.

6. Partisan extremism will not be America’s mortal wound, but universal cynicism. Believing that, regardless of who is in power, truth and justice are no longer embodied in the institutions born from our constitution, our freedom will be suffocated.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Grand Slam

  • Bobby Jones, America, and the Story of Golf
  • By: Mark Frost
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 19 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 260
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 177
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 177

In the wake of the stock-market crash and the dawn of the Great Depression, a ray of light emerged from the world of sports. In the summer of 1930, Bobby Jones, a 28-year-old amateur golfer, mounted a campaign against the record books. In four months, this natural, self-taught player conquered the British Amateur Championship, the British Open, the United States Open, and finally the United States Amateur Championship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A grand man.

  • By Fletch on 03-07-07

Grand In All

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-17

Dignity, grace and greatness are often hard to find together, and even more difficult to reconcile when they are discovered among one another. Mark Frost writes about the life of the life of Bobby Jones, a man who embodied those traits, with a grace and skill worthy of Mr. Jones.

  • Imbeciles

  • The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck
  • By: Adam Cohen
  • Narrated by: Dan Woren
  • Length: 13 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151

New York Times best-selling author Adam Cohen tells the story in Imbeciles of one of the darkest moments in the American legal tradition: the Supreme Court's decision to champion eugenic sterilization for the greater good of the country. In 1927, when the nation was caught up in eugenic fervor, the justices allowed Virginia to sterilize Carrie Buck, a perfectly normal young woman, for being an "imbecile".

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling Concept, Aggravating Execution

  • By Gillian on 04-05-16

Scary boys and girls!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-16

George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, Bram Stoker and Stephen King got nothing on Adam Cohen! Cohen's tale is no tale at all, but a tragic and shameful story from our past. The most frightening part is that so many of those we now hail as our nation's greatest minds thought the forced sterilization of "imbeciles" was a noble idea.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • H Is for Hawk

  • By: Helen Macdonald
  • Narrated by: Helen Macdonald
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,978
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,706
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,697

When Helen MacDonald's father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer captivated by hawks since childhood, she'd never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators: the goshawk. But in her grief, she saw that the goshawk's fierce and feral anger mirrored her own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mabel The Hawk--The Fire That Burned The Hurts Away

  • By Sara on 04-09-15

A Meaningful Combination of Voice & Pen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-16

A beautiful book told from a place of truth, yet still connected to places of myth and memory. All the while space remained for the reader's imagination to be added to the mix.

This book also solidified my love of listening to memoirs, especially those read by the author, rather than reading them. The memoirs of Mary Karr, Dick Van Dyke, Betty White, and many others have all had an extra special texture to them when cloaked in the voice of the author.

The combination of Helen Macdonald's pen, voice, and her willingness to share the journey through the loss of her father, make H is for Hawk a meaningful story where ultimately serenity can be found.

  • The Hangman's Daughter

  • By: Oliver Pötzsch, Lee Chadeayne (translator)
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 12 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,944
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,484
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,479

When a dying boy is pulled from the river with a mark crudely tattooed on his shoulder, hangman Jakob Kuisl is called upon to investigate whether witchcraft is at play in his small Bavarian town. When more children disappear and an orphan is found dead with the same mark, the mounting hysteria threatens to erupt. Before the unrest forces him to torture and execute the woman who aided in the birth of his children, Jakob must unravel the truth.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great but graphic

  • By Margaret on 07-14-13

Little Has Changed?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-15

As the news blares the superstition of one group or the other, finding demons in any opinion that manages to reach out of the din, The Hangman's Daughter takes on an eerie tone of more truth than one finds comfortable. The suspense of the story's plot is stoked by the potential destruction that accompanies ignorance and superstition. I look forward to reading the rest of the series.

  • Jacksonland

  • President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab
  • By: Steve Inskeep
  • Narrated by: Steve Inskeep
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 173

Jacksonland is the thrilling narrative history of two men - President Andrew Jackson and Cherokee chief John Ross - who led their respective nations at a crossroads of American history. Five decades after the Revolutionary War, the United States approached a constitutional crisis. At its center stood two former military comrades locked in a struggle that tested the boundaries of our fledgling democracy. Jacksonland is their story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truth well told

  • By White Thai on 07-26-15

A Sad History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-15

As a kid, seeing my hometown, Athens, Tennessee, in print via anything larger in scope than The Daily Post-Athenian, was always exciting. However, the three mentions of Athens in Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab by Steve Inskeep was quite sad. Calhoun, a neighboring McMinn County community to Athens, was an embarkation point for Cherokees moved in the late 1830’s, and apparently Athens offered the nearest printing press.

There was little in the book that was not sad or disappointing. I’ve long known of the horrific treatment of the Cherokees, no Indian tribe escaped human plow of manifest destiny, but somehow I thought that Jackson’s actions were at least for what he believed was a higher purpose. His motivation was little more than profit from land deals.

  • Tales of Wonder

  • By: Huston Smith
  • Narrated by: Michael McConnohie
  • Length: 5 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

Huston Smith, the man who brought the world's religions to the West, was born almost a century ago to missionary parents in China during the perilous rise of the Communist Party. Smith's lifelong spiritual journey brought him face-to-face with many of the people who shaped the 20th century. His extraordinary travels around the globe have taken him to the world's holiest places, where he has practiced religion with many of the great spiritual leaders of our time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Reckoning Wonder

  • By Lane Willson on 04-18-15

Reckoning Wonder

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-15

Reckoning is something done at length here in the hills of East Tennessee. When wonder is reckoned with, joy and awe are it's byproducts, and Smith's tale is a perfect example.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Great Dissent

  • How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind and Changed the History of Free Speech in America
  • By: Thomas Healy
  • Narrated by: Danny Campbell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178

Free speech as we know it comes less from the First Amendment than from a most unexpected source: Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lifelong skeptic, he disdained all individual rights, including the right to express one's political views. But in 1919, it was Holmes who wrote a dissenting opinion that would become the canonical affirmation of free speech in the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How a 78 year old man can learn & change his mind

  • By Jean on 09-23-13

Great Indeed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-15

I'm a very recent addition to the admirers of Justice Holmes. I fear anyone close to the intelligence, principled beliefs, and abilities of Justice Holmes would never be confirmed in today's Washington.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful