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  • Farsighted

  • By: Steven Johnson
  • Narrated by: George Newbern, Steven Johnson - introduction
  • Length: 6 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 191
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 178
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 175

There's no one-size-fits-all model for the important decisions that can alter the course of a life, an organization, or a civilization. But Farsighted explains how we can approach these choices more effectively and how we can appreciate the subtle intelligence of choices that shaped our broader social history. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed it - Not what I was expecting

  • By William Coppage on 10-08-18

30% Liberal Ideals 60% Droning 10% Actual Planning

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-19

I heard an interview with the author on the Art of Manliness Podcast and decided to buy the book to find out more based on the interview. DON'T BOTHER! Just listen to that interview, it sums the entire book up and leaves out much of the nonsense.

First off, there is so little in this book of what you actually purchased this for. So much of this is constant rehashing of the same four scenarios: Osama Bin Laden's raid (seriously, just watch Zero Dark Thirty, or read the book. That movie is half of this guy's overall research), George Washington's failure to secure Brooklyn, the pollution and decision to fill a lake in New York instead of turning it into a park, and Darwin's personal pros and cons list of getting married. That is the entire book, except with so little insight it's mind numbing.

Second, the author projects so much of how HE makes decisions onto Obama. Obama was infamously one of the most insecure and indecisive presidents ever. He would almost ALWAYS choose not to make a decision so that every decision made would be made by his staff. He was a terrible negotiator, and when talks broke down he would either cave to demands (Iran) or throw a fit and use Execitive Orders to do what he wants. Even lazy Congress gave more power to the Executive Branch's different departments during his presidency, and not the President himself. And it's also very clear that almost everything he says about Obama is conjecture. He offers no supporting information, but the only way such key information could be known that no one else knows about, had to come from personal sources. The guy spends most of the time talking about the amazing work the Federal Agencies did in figuring all of this amazing information out and planning and deciding every detail of unknown, and then concludes that it was Obama's decision making prowess that was the source of it all!

The aithor makes the bold statement along the lines that the Paris Climate Accord was one of the most ambitious and long term strategy agreements in human history. Really, that's all you need to know about this.

Lastly, there's so little about how to implement advanced long-term decision making into your life. Here's the answer: weighted scales of desired and undesired outcomes, and simulate the possibilities. There. Don't waste your time or money on this overblown propaganda.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson, Norman Doidge MD - foreword
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,447
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,275
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,947

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research. Humorous, surprising, and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Your Average 'Self Help' Book

  • By TheBookie on 06-04-18

A great listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-19

This is a great listen for sorting through the deeper meanings behind the value of sorting thrpugh your life. I only have two "issues" (not really, but close enough): he understands Christianity so well but knows nothing of God or His character (not that it's imperative for the book), and a couple of the chapters are too long in the tooth for making some side-point to support the main point of the chapter. A couple times I found myself rolling my eyes and saying, get on with it already.

Other than that, great deduction of thought by an intellectual for the simple like me

0 of 1 people found this review helpful