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Anelley

Georgia, US
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 16
  • ratings
  • Becoming

  • By: Michelle Obama
  • Narrated by: Michelle Obama
  • Length: 19 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 86,606
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 78,823
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 78,373

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites listeners into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her - from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work to her time spent at the world's most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it - in her own words and on her own terms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't know what I was getting into

  • By Kenneth Woodward on 12-05-18

"An Ordinary Person..."

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-18

"An ordinary personnel who found herself on an extraordinary journey." This book really made me fall in love with Michelle Obama. Ends on such a powerful, realistic, but hopeful note.

  • Get Well Soon

  • History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them
  • By: Jennifer Wright
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,026
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,009

In 1518, in a small town in Alsace, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn't stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon 34 more villagers joined her. Then more. In a month more than 400 people had been stricken by the mysterious dancing plague. In late-19th-century England an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome - a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis for which there was then no cure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't know syphilis could be so fascinating.

  • By Carrie Arnold on 02-09-17

The most hilarious book ever written about plagues

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-18

This book is funny and informative. Very interesting listen. The narrator matches the tone of the writing well. I will definitely look out for more books by the author and will probably re-listen to this. Definitely recommend. One of my favorite audiobooks.

  • Murder in an English Village

  • By: Jessica Ellicott
  • Narrated by: Barbara Rosenblat
  • Length: 9 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,582
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,382
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,368

The year is 1920: Flying in the face of convention, legendary American adventuress Beryl Helliwell never fails to surprise and shock. The last thing her adoring public would expect is that she craves some peace and quiet. The humdrum hamlet of Walmsley Parva in the English countryside seems just the ticket. And, honestly, until America comes to its senses and repeals Prohibition, Beryl has no intention of returning stateside and subjecting herself to bathtub gin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Can't Wait For Next Book

  • By Sally W. Harris on 05-22-18

Cozy murder mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-18

Cozy murder mystery. Love the characters, and LOVE the narrator. Her ability to give each character his/her own accent and personality really shines. Her talent matches the writing tone and really made this a 5 star book for me. I will be looking at the sequel.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Assata

  • By: Assata Shakur, Angela Davis - foreword
  • Narrated by: Sirena Riley
  • Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 759
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 673
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 670

In 2013 Assata Shakur, founding member of the Black Liberation Army, former Black Panther and godmother of Tupac Shakur, became the first ever woman to make the FBI's most wanted list. Assata Shakur's trial and conviction for the murder of a white State Trooper in the spring of 1973 divided America. Her case quickly became emblematic of race relations and police brutality in the USA. While Assata's detractors continue to label her a ruthless killer, her defenders cite her as the victim of a systematic, racist campaign.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome

  • By The Black Awareness Book Club (On Facebook) on 10-06-17

I wish it was longer!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-18

I still have so many more questions! I guess it is limited in scope as it is an Autobiography and immsure for legal reasons she can't elaborate on her escape, which is probably the most interesting part. I would have liked to know more about her relationships while in the BLA and such. I definitely want to learn more about the BPP and other figures of that time now. Especially trying to understand the justification of the state and federal for their prosecution and putting her on the FBIs most wanted list.

  • The Man Who Invented Christmas

  • How Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday Spirits
  • By: Les Standiford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 5 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 144
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 138

Just before Christmas in 1843, a debt-ridden and dispirited Charles Dickens wrote a small book he hoped would keep his creditors at bay. His publisher turned it down, so Dickens used what little money he had to put out A Christmas Carol himself. He worried it might be the end of his career as a novelist. The book immediately caused a sensation. And it breathed new life into a holiday that had fallen into disfavor, undermined by lingering Puritanism and the cold modernity of the Industrial Revolution.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully Told!

  • By JodyB on 12-01-17

Too much about publishing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-17

Expected it to be more about the evolution of the modern Christmas and Dickens' role in that. Instead it was a biography of Dickens with emphasis on his writing career and his publishing trials. There was a main focus in the publishing industry, how and in what manner Dickens published his works and what money he got for writing what. There's only really one chapter about A Christmas Carol and one chapter about its part in the evolution modern Christmas culture. Other reviews have said as much but I hoped it was an excess of needless information with kernels of relevance. But cut away the publishing info and there isn't much in the book. I'm disappointed and didn't learn much. Looking to read The Battle for Christmas next for the type of book I expected to find here.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful