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Brian

Niagara Falls, NY
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  • Sandfire

  • Caine: Rapid Fire, Book 3
  • By: Andrew Warren, Aiden L. Bailey
  • Narrated by: Chris Abell
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

Before he was betrayed, Caine was still an assassin.... As the CIA's deadliest operative, Caine is tasked with eliminating America's most dangerous enemies. But Caine is a professional. His missions of death have rarely been personal. Until now. A fellow operative is killed on an icy New Zealand mountain. A shipment of vital medicine disappears from a UN cargo container. And a CIA cargo plane is shot down in the vast Empty Quarter desert. These seemingly unrelated events are all linked to a shadowy operation, known only as SANDFIRE...and if exposed, the fallout could engulf the Arabian Peninsula in war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • SANDFIRE---What An Outstanding Book & Performance!

  • By Dennis H on 12-10-18

Warren & Bailey Make A Great Thriller Team

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-19

4.5 out of 5 stars

A plane crashes in the desert – we’re not sure if anyone survives (we’re told that a major player dies on it). The plane is also carrying much-needed medicine to a disease-torn area. On top of all this, there was something even more important on this crashed plane – a data stick that could bring down some high up people and ruin a major political relationship. Since dropping out of the sky, anyone who has seen the crash or the dropping plane has been kidnapped or murdered. The US sends in Thomas Caine, overall BAMF, and current assassin to try and find more info.

Sandfire is not my first Caine book, but it is my first book co-authored by Aiden L. Bailey. While talking about the upcoming release, Warren mentioned that I should be excited about Bailey (and now I can see why). Sandfire was a blast from beginning to end. A Bourne-like thriller where Caine is able to get in and out of situations that you’d never expect.

The writing is fast-paced and allows for little or no time to think about what is going on. Warren and Bailey keep the pacing fast to allow for a quick story without losing out on the important stuff. In yet another “Caine before he was betrayed” book – there is a further insight into his past and more about who he really is as a person. I love getting that background info and learning that Caine is a deeply good man who is forced into bad situation after bad situation.

There is trickery and deceit and lives are at stake. Terrorists will have their heads roll and Caine will do everything he can to keep his promises.

A fun read from beginning to end that I flew through.

  • Overlord

  • A Sam Aston Investigation, Book 2
  • By: David Wood, Alan Baxter
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

Marine biologist Sam Aston is hired to explore a series of subterranean caverns deep beneath the Antarctic. Somewhere within this lost world of magnificent caverns and underground seas lies a source of limitless clean energy, but something guards this treasure. As enemies bent on obtaining this world-changing resource for themselves close in from above, Aston and his team plunge further into the depths and discover they are not the first to come this way...and they are not alone.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sucked Me In

  • By Brian on 01-10-19

Sucked Me In

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-10-19

I knew going into Overlord, how much I liked the first book in this series Primordial (click for my review). So I assumed I was going to enjoy Overlord just as much – and I did. It has that creature feature feel with some science, mystery, and investigation that I love in an Adventure book.

I think one of the things I enjoyed most was that it didn’t really mess around getting into the story. We are introduced to Aston again in the beginning. We figure out where he’s hiding and he’s basically bribed into helping out. From that point on Overlord is basically balls-to-the-wall action with a little bit of setting up here and there to keep the story going.

Wood and Baxter know how to write stories that both make you laugh and cringe. There were scenes where I was cracking up at the things that Aston and company said, like

“The cavern was so quiet you could have heard a mouse fart..."

I mean that’s hilarious and almost out of place in a book like this. Almost. And then we’re thrown into scenes where things are attacking everyone and insane and brutal death is imminent. I loved the back and forth and it makes for a deeply enjoyable story.

There were three main non-human characters in the story and each of them was interesting in their own ways. I can’t really go into why or who they were as to not spoil the story but the ending and how they figure out what is going on (and how to ‘fix’ it) was fascinating and kept me up late into the night to finish it.

Overall, a great adventure story mixed with a creature feature. A book that grabbed my attention early and held on the entire time.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dawn of the Storm

  • A Raina Storm Action Thriller
  • By: Kim Cresswell
  • Narrated by: Sarah L. Colton
  • Length: 3 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

A jihadist pledges his allegiance to al Qaeda with an unthinkable act...and the terrorist cell is just getting started. Raina Storm, the CIA's most lethal operative, is off the grid, leading a secluded and comfortable life with her six-year-old daughter in Barstow, California. But peace is short-lived when a former FBI agent and an ex-intelligence officer track Raina down and blackmail her into helping them stop a new threat.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Action-packed from the first to the last word.....

  • By Katie on 01-13-19

Quick and to the Point

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

I had never heard of Kim Cresswell before picking up Dawn of the Storm, but I will be seeking her out in the future, especially the continuation of this series.

Dawn of the Storm tells the story of a terrorist plot and how we plan on stopping it using one of our best operatives. We are quickly introduced to Raina Storm and we’re not sure why they want her and only her for this mission. But, we also quickly find out that she’s the exact person we need.

Raina was a likable character who did everything almost right (she is human, of course). Cresswell writes her as this sort of perfect shadowy assassin (in numerous meanings of those words). And we’re treated to numerous showings of just what she can accomplish. I could tell that we were being introduced to a character but the plot and story made the introduction interesting and action-packed. Cresswell was able to write action in a way that was fast, brutal, and to the point without sacrificing much.

Overall, I thought that Dawn of the Storm was a good intro book with action, intrigue, and a no-nonsense approach to a terrorist thriller. Short, and to the point, Storm is the first book in a series and I’m curious to see what happens next.

I did not read any of the books where some of these characters were from, but I don’t think it took anything away. It was a shorter book that did skimp on some details, but it didn’t stop me from understanding who they were, why they were there, and what was going on.

  • Affliction

  • The Alt Apocalypse, Book 4
  • By: Tom Abrahams
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

The Alt Apocalypse is the newest ground-breaking series from Tom Abrahams. It explores survival under the most extreme circumstances, but with a twist (and no cliffhangers). This series, which can be heard in any order, features the same core characters in each complete story. But every book dunks them into a new, alternate apocalypse. In Affliction, Abrahams tells the story of a mysterious team of researchers, four college friends, an ex-con, a lonely fry cook, and a secretive group of prepared civilians as they each battle to survive in southern California after an outbreak of a new, deadly disease....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • keeps getting better

  • By A. Whalen on 12-14-18

Edge-Of-My-Seat Suspense

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-18

While chatting with another reviewer (and co-blogger) about Affliction we were both talking about how much we enjoyed this book. And honestly, I think it might be my favorite in the series. There is something about the tension that kept building and building (that never really goes away) that really made Affliction suspenseful.

Early into my boarding of the Alt Apocalypse hype train, I heard that Tom was going to write a book about some sort of plague/virus/etc. I was scared. I wasn’t scared because I didn’t think he could do it, I knew he could. I was scared that it wasn’t going to be as in depth or descriptive (read: sciencey) as I hoped it would be. I’m glad to report that I was dead wrong. A lot of authors will shy away from real science and give you the cookie cutter “there was a virus and it killed 99% of the population”, but he did not.

Abrahams kills it with Affliction. The spreading plague that he describes is so real it makes the book even scarier. He was able to take real things, throw them into a test tube, shake them up, and make something genuinely terrifying.

I’ve been trying to figure out how to talk about this next part without spoiling everything. But I will say if you have not read the other books in this series – it will be slightly spoiler-ish coming up here. The best part about Affliction other than all the things I’ve already stated above is the fact that Abrahams starts to connect the dots a little bit. You get that deja vu sense (along with the characters) combined with the gnawing sense that you have a feeling where he’s going. I absolutely love that he’s starting to tie the loose ends together and beginning to complete the full story arc but I can also tell that we have a couple more books to go.

The characters, who we’re all familiar with by now, 4 books in, are somehow more relatable and more real in Affliction. I don’t know how he did it, but he made it just so damn genuine that you actually feel for them. A few scenes I was really worried about some of them. And he even tied up some of the loose ends that I didn’t know were out there and talked about a specific character and how they every time without fail they die in some gruesome way.

In a momentum shift – Abrahams went from non-stop action in Torrent to an edge-of-your-seat suspense book and in my opinion, it was exactly what the series needed. It doesn’t shake up the whole series but it definitely sets things up for later.

I honestly scrutinized this book a lot trying to find something to complain about (I know Tom reads these and takes the bad and the good in stride). But there wasn’t anything in Affliction that I didn’t like. It was a pure suspenseful thrill ride from beginning to end. Easily one of the best books I’ve read in 2018.

  • The Life We Bury

  • By: Allen Eskens
  • Narrated by: Zach Villa
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41,746
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,179
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,101

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran-and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good listen!

  • By Lori on 12-14-15

Came Highly Recommended

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-18

Allen Eskens' The Life We Bury came highly recommended by a former co-worker of mine and having now finished it myself, I wholeheartedly second her sentiments. I'm almost ashamed to admit how long it sat on my digital "bookshelf" awaiting a listen--I truly had no idea what I was missing.

The story opens with college student Joe Talbert desperately seeking a subject for his English class biography project. When he visits a nursing home and asks if any residents might be available for an interview, Joe is introduced to Carl Iverson, a Vietnam veteran who was recently medically paroled after spending several decades in prison for the rape and murder of a young girl. As his conversations with Carl progress, Joe becomes increasingly suspicious of the facts as they had been presented in Court and begins to wonder what Carl is hiding and what really happened to the young girl so many years ago. Is Carl innocent? If so, who killed her? And why did Carl so willingly serve time for a crime he may not have committed? Joe gains access to the trial file and begins his own quest for justice, hoping to exonerate Carl before he passes away. With the help of his neighbor Lila, Joe juggles the investigation, the completion of his biography assignment, his job, and caring for his autistic brother Jeremy with a good deal of success.

The characters in this mystery are so well developed that at times, I forgot I was reading (listening to) a piece of fiction. Joe, Lila, Carl, and Jeremy are immediately likable--I felt a great deal of empathy for Joe, Jeremy, and Carl at various points throughout the story and admired Lila for her compassion. Joe and Jeremy share a special bond, one that many who have siblings can likely relate to, while Lila has a heart of gold and a healthy dose of curiosity. The family dynamics in this story add drama to an already intriguing story and the dialogue is great. The plot is well paced. It's driven by an urgency to solve the puzzle before Carl runs out of time but doesn't feel rushed.

Zach Villa's narration was amazing, helping listeners connect to the characters on a more visceral level. The only downside to having such a great narrator is that it can make listening to your next read a little less exciting! After listening to The Life We Bury, I had a hard time picking a story to listen to next.

I was excited to see that Esken's wrote a sequel to The Life We Bury (The Shadows We Hide) and brought Villa back to narrate once again. I am sincerely looking forward to more of Joe, Lila, and Jeremy but appreciate the way The Life We Bury ended. I think Eskens gave readers enough closure to move on, making it a great stand-alone piece, but made his characters so lovable that you might not want to. Stay tuned for a review on The Shadows We Hide.

  • The Last Faoii

  • By: Tahani Nelson
  • Narrated by: Sara Morsey
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

The Faoii have protected Clearwall for generations. With militaristic order and stalwart discipline, these women have reigned in prosperity. But when her monastery is attacked and her sisters slaughtered, only young Kaiya-faoii is left alive. Forced to cope without the long-standing traditions of her Order, Kaiya travels the country on a mission to avenge her sisters and preserve what is left of her heritage. The search brings her not only to dark discoveries and ancient family secrets, but to something she never wanted or dreamed of: a brother she never knew she had.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Action and great characters!

  • By Andrew P. Mallamo on 12-18-18

Visceral and Intense

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-18

4.25 out of 5 stars

I normally don’t look at other reviews before writing mine since I don’t want to be affected by what they wrote or said but The Last Faoii left me feeling confused. Not in a bad way but I couldn’t put the book into words. In my head, that’s a good thing since it means that it was something new and unique that I couldn’t quickly bucket into a word or feeling.

The feeling that I think I was trying to figure out was intensely visceral. The book was real and deep and dark at times, but I thought that Nelson did a wonderful job writing a world, characters, and an overall story arc that kept me going “just a few more minutes” until it was late into the night.

Fantasy isn’t normally my jam and Epic Fantasy is even less, but there was something about The Last Faoii that pulled me in and held on. I couldn’t stop reading it and I wanted to figure out what was going to happen minute after minute.

The only issues I had with it were probably more personal and an issue related to the genre and the tropes surrounding it. I won’t even air them here since there isn’t a major reason to put a black eye on an otherwise great book.

Nelson’s work was only elevated by Morsey’s narration. She was able to take an already good book and turn it into something better. I love when a narrator is able to embody a work like I felt that Morsey did with The Last Faoii.

Overall, an enjoyable work of Epic Fantasy that had me staying up way too late to get through another chapter.

  • Make Me No Grave

  • By: Hayley Stone
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153

Almena Guillory, better known as the Grizzly Queen of the West, has plenty to recommend her for the noose, but US Marshal Apostle Richardson enforces the law, he doesn't decide it. When a posse tries to lynch Almena ahead of her trial, Apostle refuses their form of expedited justice - and receives a bullet for his trouble. Before escaping, however, Almena unexpectedly saves his life by absorbing his wound through the use of dangerous flesh magic.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Strong characters hold together a weird west world

  • By Jamie on 12-01-18

A Crazy Combo That Works... Kinda

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-18

This might be the hardest review I've ever written.  I'll explain why briefly.  I liked the book, I really did.  But I also didn't like the book. The major problem is that I can't put my finger on why I didn't like it.  I'll go into the reasons that I did like it and try to explain why I didn't.

Lawman, Marshal, and all-around do-gooder Apostle Richardson is one of two main characters in Make Me No Grave.  Other than how I described him above, he's also a kind and forward thinking kind of guy.  He does his job and does it well, but also doesn't want someone to be killed unrightfully or hanged for the wrong reason. He fights for what he believes is right and this could be both his greatest strength and weakness.

The other main character is the outlaw "Grizzly Queen of the West" Almena Guillory (whose name I'm glad that Wyman had to say and not me because I would have butchered it and I did when trying to read the description to a friend).  Apostle and Almena cross paths when he arrests her for crimes shes supposedly committed but ends up protecting her from numerous others who want to see her hang (or die in some way, shape, or form).  And in the process gets sucked into a world that he didn't even know existed.

So, Make Me No Grave is coined as a Weird Western.  I can agree with that genre description. It's basically if you took some elemental form/forms of magic and threw them into the 1800's Midwest, you would have this book.  Since it's mentioned in the description I'll mention it here.  They call what Almena has/can do a "flesh witch".  I won't go into what that means, but it was pretty cool and definitely something new and unique to the Western genre.

The story definitely went by faster when the two of them were together but even then it sort of dragged on.  I can't tell if it was the delivery (purposefully drawn out southern drawls, etc) or the writing style trying to make everything take just a little bit longer - but I think this was my biggest issue with the story.  Things were going on but they weren't going on fast enough or with enough pacing.  It would be a major shootout and I didn't feel that jolt of electricity where you feel like everyone (or at least the main characters) are in much danger.  It's not because they were that unkillable or that good with their weapons, it was just... something. I'm unsure of what, but it just seemed like every time they were thrown into the blender - they came out unscathed or at least barely scathed (if that's a word on its own).

So, Make Me No Grave.  A story that I both really liked and didn't for drastically different reasons.  A story that I think a lot of people would like and one that I think coined as being similar to Red Dead Redemption was pretty darn close.  So close that I couldn't listen to it on my way home, play RDR2, and then listen some more.  The stories and storytelling were that similar.  Even more similar to RDR was the fact that to get anywhere you had to travel, by horse, for (in modern times) what feels like way too long.

Hayley Stone is an extremely talented writer who is able to combine two genres I didn't expect to work together and make it work.  It wasn't 100% for me, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have its audience (at the time of writing I believe it has a 4.5 rating on Audible and Goodreads).  I liked more than I didn't like, hence the 3 stars.  I would probably give it 3.5 but since I couldn't exactly hit what bugged me, I had to leave that last half star off.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Carbon

  • The Watcher Series, Book 2
  • By: AJ Eversley
  • Narrated by: Chelsea Stephens, Steve Campbell
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6

Sawyer spent most of her life hunting the very thing she has now become. No longer the Watcher she once was, Sawyer struggles to make sense of her new identity. Though she has new powers and abilities, she is also tied to the control that comes with those powers. Desperate for help and answers, Sawyer travels to the United Isles with Max in search of an ally. Not only must she learn to harness her new abilities, she must find a way to mend a broken heart. Help comes in unexpected ways, and though she is ready to fight back, it's not going to be easy. Strangers will become allies. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sawyer Is Awesome

  • By Brian on 12-16-18

Sawyer Is Awesome

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-18

Carbon is the second book in the Watcher series by AJ Eversley and it jumps in right where Watcher left off. We are following Sawyer as she is trying to learn to control herself, her new body, and her emotions. The intro to the story has us following them to the United Isles which is where I thought that Eversley's writing really shined.  As she was describing the shore where they landed, the people, the houses, and the castle I felt like I was taken to another world.  The setting, while drastically different from Watcher, was still one of the strong points of this book.

Understanding that this is a YA dystopian book I go into it expecting a few things.  Love interests and sometimes triangles are going to be there.  Young men and women who don't completely understand their bodies, emotions, and hormones will also usually be in play. Carbon has all of those things but doesn't feel like it's falling for the same typical tropes as well.  I was chatting with Paul from Audiobook Reviewer and I told him that I felt like I knew/understood where the love interest was going to go but I actually had no idea how the book and the main story was going to end.  I was genuinely surprised by the ending.

Another strong suit of Eversley is her actual storytelling.  She jumps around a bit but it's so that you can see the story from both sides.  You get to know Sawyer and all of her goings on (princess, Max, etc) but then we jump to Coleman and his minions.  Seeing it from both sides doesn't always help you guess or figure out what is going to happen.  There were numerous times where things were said that I thought "Woah!"

Having a dual narration for each "side" of this issue helped with the back and forth as well.  As I believe I mentioned in my original review I thought that Chelsea Stephens absolutely kills it in her narration of Sawyer - she just is Sawyer and it's perfect.  Steve Campbell's voicing of the "bad guys" in this was perfect.  He has a deeper (but still young sounding voice) that I think lends itself not only to this story but to YA in general.

Overall, I thought that Carbon was good but not great.  And there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. There were some typical YA themes within, but if you're a fan of other books in this genre with strong female leads - you will not be disappointed by this series.

4-stars is nothing to scoff at and I'm genuinely waiting for the third book to come out on audio.  Eversley, Stephens, and Campbell give us a sneak peek at book 3 at the end of Carbon's audiobook - but I skipped it hoping to enjoy it beginning to end in early 2019.

Looking at the cover again and re-thinking about the first two books.  I could see a younger Mila Kunis playing Sawyer.  This has nothing to do with my review - I just wanted to point it out if this ever becomes a movie! :)

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The 5 Manners of Death

  • By: Darden North
  • Narrated by: Steven Jay Cohen
  • Length: 10 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

A construction worker unearths a human skull dating to the 1960s on the campus of the University of Mississippi. Dr. Diana Bratton is a surgeon surrounded by bodies after the discovery of her Aunt Phoebe’s 50-year-old note detailing the manners of death. Suicide, accident, natural cause, and one death classified undetermined are soon crossed off this list - leaving Diana to believe that only murder remains. When Diana spots photographs in a 1966 university yearbook, Phoebe is linked not only to that death, but to the recent deaths of two local men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thrilling murder, mystery

  • By Rabid Reader on 12-31-18

5 Manners of Death Hooked Me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

The 5 Manners of Death tells a story of Dr. Diana Bratton and her frenzied search to find out who or what is causing people around her to drop like flies.  At first, they aren't closely connected, just friends of friends, but she's convinced there might be more to the story.  She connects with her buddy and, of course, he's also the Chief of Police (it was a little too "good to be true" but I'll let that be for now).

Bratton as a character was excellent though. She was likable and you found yourself rooting for her to solve the mystery as the days and pages passed by. There was a part of the book where, I won't say I was worried, but I was definitely anxious to figure out what was happening.  If not for me, but for Bratton to finally be rid of the mystery and the intrigue.

North writes a fast-paced procedural-like mystery set in the modern South that jumps back and forth from 1965 to the present.  The back and forth was needed and really helped set both the pace and the intrigue for the rest of the story.

I particularly liked the overall arc of the story.  I kept guessing and guess and I was pleased that after my third or fourth, "no I'm sure of it now" thoughts - I happened to get it right.  I promise it didn't take away from the story in the least.

Throw in the narration by the extremely talented (and nice guy) Steven Jay Cohen, you have a book that lept off the pages and into your ears.  He was able to give life to North's already exciting words and really added that next level to this book.

I liked it and I think you will too. I can't think of any other books to compare it to, but it was a good one.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Biohack

  • Gender Wars, Book 1
  • By: J. D. Lasica
  • Narrated by: Denise Howell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20

Valerie Ramirez, a special ed teacher still haunted by her toddler’s drowning accident, faces a fateful decision when she’s admitted into an exclusive program run by a mysterious biotech company. Kaden Baker, an elite hacker who dabbles in covert ops, finds her life turned upside down when she discovers her parents turn out to be imposters. Where does she come from? Who’s been financing her high-stakes secret missions? The answers lead back to the same sinister biotech firm. As Kaden and Valerie become allies, they make one startling discovery after another about the company’s dark intentions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great Sci-Fi thrill ride

  • By cosmitron on 07-14-18

I Was Whelmed By Biohack (Not Over or Under)

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

Biohack by JD Lasica was one of those books that I got excited when I saw the cover. Once I started to get into the book I wasn't over or underwhelmed. I was just... whelmed, which I don't think is a real word.

(gif from 10 Things I Hate About You)

There was something about it that tickled my fancy but also some parts of it (and maybe a little bit caused by the narration) that weren't perfect.

I can tell that Lasica did his research while prepping this book. The two main parts split between hacking and genetics. And I didn't feel like any of it was too "far out" and some of it was like "oh yeah, that makes sense". A cool concept for a near future book for sure.

Sometimes when there are a lot of characters in a book there can be too many. I think that Biohack flirted the line with this from time to time.

Overall, it was a book that I enjoyed but I didn't love. I was "whelmed" by it and I would be potentially interested in diving into this world in the near future.