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Brian

Niagara Falls, NY
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  • The 5 Manners of Death

  • By: Darden North
  • Narrated by: Steven Jay Cohen
  • Length: 10 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4

A construction worker unearths a human skull dating to the 1960s on the campus of the University of Mississippi. Dr. Diana Bratton is a surgeon surrounded by bodies after the discovery of her Aunt Phoebe’s 50-year-old note detailing the manners of death. Suicide, accident, natural cause, and one death classified undetermined are soon crossed off this list - leaving Diana to believe that only murder remains. When Diana spots photographs in a 1966 university yearbook, Phoebe is linked not only to that death, but to the recent deaths of two local men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Terrific Listen to a Memorable Mystery

  • By Michael P. Hartnett on 12-07-18

5 Manners of Death Hooked Me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

The 5 Manners of Death tells a story of Dr. Diana Bratton and her frenzied search to find out who or what is causing people around her to drop like flies.  At first, they aren't closely connected, just friends of friends, but she's convinced there might be more to the story.  She connects with her buddy and, of course, he's also the Chief of Police (it was a little too "good to be true" but I'll let that be for now).

Bratton as a character was excellent though. She was likable and you found yourself rooting for her to solve the mystery as the days and pages passed by. There was a part of the book where, I won't say I was worried, but I was definitely anxious to figure out what was happening.  If not for me, but for Bratton to finally be rid of the mystery and the intrigue.

North writes a fast-paced procedural-like mystery set in the modern South that jumps back and forth from 1965 to the present.  The back and forth was needed and really helped set both the pace and the intrigue for the rest of the story.

I particularly liked the overall arc of the story.  I kept guessing and guess and I was pleased that after my third or fourth, "no I'm sure of it now" thoughts - I happened to get it right.  I promise it didn't take away from the story in the least.

Throw in the narration by the extremely talented (and nice guy) Steven Jay Cohen, you have a book that lept off the pages and into your ears.  He was able to give life to North's already exciting words and really added that next level to this book.

I liked it and I think you will too. I can't think of any other books to compare it to, but it was a good one.

  • Biohack

  • Gender Wars, Book 1
  • By: J. D. Lasica
  • Narrated by: Denise Howell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 19

Valerie Ramirez, a special ed teacher still haunted by her toddler’s drowning accident, faces a fateful decision when she’s admitted into an exclusive program run by a mysterious biotech company. Kaden Baker, an elite hacker who dabbles in covert ops, finds her life turned upside down when she discovers her parents turn out to be imposters. Where does she come from? Who’s been financing her high-stakes secret missions? The answers lead back to the same sinister biotech firm. As Kaden and Valerie become allies, they make one startling discovery after another about the company’s dark intentions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great Sci-Fi thrill ride

  • By cosmitron on 07-14-18

I Was Whelmed By Biohack (Not Over or Under)

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

Biohack by JD Lasica was one of those books that I got excited when I saw the cover. Once I started to get into the book I wasn't over or underwhelmed. I was just... whelmed, which I don't think is a real word.

(gif from 10 Things I Hate About You)

There was something about it that tickled my fancy but also some parts of it (and maybe a little bit caused by the narration) that weren't perfect.

I can tell that Lasica did his research while prepping this book. The two main parts split between hacking and genetics. And I didn't feel like any of it was too "far out" and some of it was like "oh yeah, that makes sense". A cool concept for a near future book for sure.

Sometimes when there are a lot of characters in a book there can be too many. I think that Biohack flirted the line with this from time to time.

Overall, it was a book that I enjoyed but I didn't love. I was "whelmed" by it and I would be potentially interested in diving into this world in the near future.

  • Currency of Souls

  • By: Kealan Patrick Burke
  • Narrated by: Rich Miller
  • Length: 7 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

Welcome to Eddie's Tavern, the only functioning waterhole in a near-dead town. Among the people you'll meet tonight are: Tom, Milestone's haunted lawman, who walks in the shadow of death; Gracie, the barmaid, a wannabe actress, doomed to spend her hours tending bar in a purgatory of her father's making; Flo, the town seductress, who may or may not have murdered her husband; Cobb, a nudist awaiting an apology from the commune who cast him out.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WHOA! NOW THAT'S INTERESTING!

  • By Victoria Haugen on 08-19-18

An Absolutely Bizarre Book (That I Liked)

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-18

First and foremost – this is my first Kealan Patrick Burke book. I want to start by saying it won’t be my last. It was an absolutely bizarre book but I enjoyed every second of it. Every time I thought I could figure out what was going on I was way off. And every time I guessed the ending – same thing – I wasn’t even close. Burke was able to write a book that confused and enthralled me throughout.

The premise, if I can get that right – is there are a group of people who live in Milestone. They all go to the same watering hole and all do basically the same thing every week. At eleven, the reverend will come in and one of the patrons will be told to drive. They’ll also be given a name or names of someone. Tonight will be different for the first time in three years.

There was a lot going on here under that surface – family issues, self-doubt, anger related to death, death, and more death. Along with the craziness that was actually going on in this town (Dean Martin’s ghost visits, there are crazy deer attacking a house, and a dead wife who will come out when a specific song is played).

I wasn’t sure when someone was going to wake up and realize it was all a dream – but that didn’t happen. I thought all of this was going to be some crazy drunken misremembering. It wasn’t. It was an absolutely crazy story where every word, sentence, and paragraph were necessary to move the plot forward.

  • The Fated Sky

  • Lady Astronaut, Book 2
  • By: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 256
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243

Mary Robinette Kowal continues the grand sweep of alternate history begun in The Calculating Stars. The Fated Sky looks forward to 1961, when mankind is well established on the moon and looking forward to its next step: journeying to, and eventually colonizing, Mars. Of course the noted Lady Astronaut Elma York would like to go, but there’s a lot riding on whoever the International Aerospace Coalition decides to send on this historic - but potentially very dangerous - mission. Could Elma really leave behind her husband and the chance to start a family to spend several years traveling to Mars? 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic sequel to the first book ! <br />

  • By shane on 09-12-18

A Great Conclusion to the Lady Astronaut Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-18

In The Fated Sky: A Lady Astronaut Novel, Mary Robinette Kowal returns as both author and narrator, bringing us the next chapter of Elma York’s story. If you enjoyed the first book of this duology (The Calculating Stars), you will certainly not be disappointed by its sequel. Kowal once again expertly combines the genres of science fiction and historical fiction to draw listeners back into Elma’s world, an alternate version of the 1960’s, where warming oceans are causing catastrophic changes.

Having successfully completed her first mission, Elma has returned to Earth and is learning to manage the challenges associated with her “lady astronaut” fame while she and other survivors of the meteorite struggle to adapt to their new reality and prepare for the impending climate challenges. When the International Aerospace Coalition begins to plan an exploratory mission to Mars, Elma, who recently handled a crisis/hostage situation with grace and courage, is thrust back into the spotlight and offered a position aboard the ship. She grapples with the decision–it’s literally the opportunity of a lifetime–but the sacrifices would be tremendous. Participating would l mean spending years away from her husband, brother, and nephew, forgoing the opportunity to have children of her own, and potentially taking the spot of a well-trained, dedicated, and committed fellow astronaut.

The Fated Sky revisits themes of racism and sexism, highlights the concept of implicit bias, questions the decision making in disaster relief plans and distribution of resources, and contemplates the multitude of sacrifices one might make when deploying in service to their country. Stetson Parker returns, snarky as always, but Kowal introduces a new side of this character, developing him in a way that forces reader’s to empathize with him while we explore themes of grief and loss. The science seems well done and the overarching conflict drives the plot along–will they make it to Mars and save the world? Kowal’s ability to create a world so similar to our’s while maintaining some distance in an obviously alternate reality allows readers to think about these complicated issues in a way that might not otherwise be possible.

Overall, the Fated Sky was a great conclusion to the Lady Astronaut story. The characters are likable (except for when they aren’t supposed to be), the conflict-driven plot is interesting, and the themes are thought-provoking. Kowal’s writing and narration were both phenomenal as always and have me wondering which of her stories I should add to my library next.

  • You're Going to Mars!

  • By: Rob Dircks
  • Narrated by: Khristine Hvam
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 270
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 269

Living and slaving in Fill City One, you get used to the smell. We call it the Everpresent Stink. But every once in a while, on a spring day with a breeze, it clears away enough to remind us that there is something more out there. Most Fillers' wildest dreams would be just to get past the walls and live in the mainland. But my dream? It’s a little bigger. I’m going to Mars.   

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Reviewers Choice Award, its that good

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 11-13-18

A Remarkable Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

Rob Dircks' You're Going to Mars is a remarkable book voiced by a talented narrator. The protagonist, Paper (aka Pepper, aka Robin) is intelligent, empathetic, loyal, resolute, and completely intent on one day making it to Mars, regardless of how slim the odds may be. She is immediately likable and I found myself desperately hoping she'd somehow find a way to accomplish her mission, enjoy the adventure along the way, and secure an advantageous outcome for her whole family.

You're Going to Mars is part Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, part Survivor, part the Martian, and part Obscura, but set in the world of Disney's Wall-E...kind of. If you're familiar with Wall-E, you may recall that robots scavenged and processed waste in the future, assigned to a certain geographical location to "clean up" abandoned cities while humans lived elsewhere, in a place largely influenced by corporations. The world Dircks creates in You're going to Mars is reminiscent of Wall-E's world, except there are people mining and processing waste instead of robots, and the others aren't living aboard a starliner, but rather in the "mainland" of the United States.

Triplets Paper, Rock, and Scissors live with their father and grandmother in Fill City One where they are expected to continue this work for the duration of their lives. We learn that they are not considered citizen's of the United States but instead, belong to the corporation that owns and operates Fill City One (and other cities like it). Dircks masterfully utilizes sensory imagery to transport readers to Paper's world, enabling readers to see, hear, smell, taste, and feel everything that Paper does throughout the book. For instance, Paper describes her home as a place filled with both love, and a distinct smell... a place where the smell of methane and waste is such constant that the fillers have given it a name: "Everpresent Stink." The "Everpresent Stink"  is so deeply a part of her world that Paper immediately notices its absence when she takes her first breath outside of Fill City One.

When Paper receives the prized and much sought after Red Scarab, she embraces the adventure and eagerly awaits the opportunity to compete for a seat on the first manned mission to Mars, an opportunity that could fulfill her childhood dream of visiting the Red Planet while also drastically improving the quality of life for her family. The first step is escaping Fill City and the next is winning Zach Larson's reality TV show (think Survivor meets American Idol, where contestants compete against each other to win a series of challenges based on the skills they'll need to survive on Mars, earning points for both victories and viewer engagement).

The trouble begins almost immediately, with a risky escape from Fill City One, a potentially dangerous cross-country road trip, and a rigorous and challenging series of tests including physical competitions, the emotional strain associated with living away from her tight-knit family (in confined quarters with near strangers), and several instances of apparent sabotage, leaving Paper and other contestants to wonder what exactly they're willing to risk to set foot on Mars and what the saboteurs could possibly be trying to hide.

You're Going to Mars was one of the most interesting, entertaining stories I've listened to in quite a while. A fabulously written book with a unique plot, endearing characters, and a richly crafted world, You're Going to Mars is one of those books I just didn't want to put down until I finished it. I found myself eager to get in the car for my morning and evening commutes, looking forward to picking up where I left off and hoping for a few extra minutes of listening time every day. Dircks creates a near-future world that's so believable you might forget you're not really living in it and characters so likable and relatable that you may forget they don't really exist.

You'll likely find yourself cheering for Paper/Pepper/Robin, wondering if she should really trust that guy or that girl, wishing for the safety of her family, and wondering how on earth she's going to pull it all off. The book's narrator, Khristine Hvam helps to achieve this connection, lending Paper a voice that seems fitting for her personality and adding a certain depth to the characters that highlight Dircks superb character development.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Splat! A Quirky Cat Audio Book

  • By: Adele Park
  • Narrated by: full cast
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1

Skitters the Cat seems to have it all, but when his twitchy teen handlers get tangled up with a polygamist cult in Utah, the fur begins to fly. For Brandon Spinkle, the son of the lead singer for a band called the Rectal Surgeons, dating a polygamist girl is hardly a pleasure cruise through the love canal. Especially after Brandon's mother becomes a contestant on a reality TV show called Celebrity Cougars. Narrated by a full cast of characters, this outrageous comedy is highlighted with snarky commentary from Skitters the Cat. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • What An Interesting Book

  • By Brian on 11-21-18

What An Interesting Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

I’m a major purveyor of audiobooks and I haven’t seen too many books that skip print/ebook altogether. Splat! and the rest of the Quirky audiobook series seemed to have done that and I think I understand why. These books seem to work best in audio form and wouldn’t be as good on a page compared to in your ear.

Splat! was one of those books that I went into thinking “that’s a crazy description, let’s see, the book can’t be that balls to the wall bizarre”. I thought wrong and shouldn’t have doubted Park’s ability to write a story that was both interesting and entertaining.

I was cracking up as I read this and kept finding myself thinking “what on earth can she come up with next?” I was surprised page after page as Park threw different satirical punches to keep me on my toes late into the 10th round. I’m not sure the age range that this is written for but parts of it felt like it was for a young adult (minus all of the cursing and adult themes).

It was a book that needed to be read by multiple actors or I don’t think it would have worked. The full cast performance stands out since you know who is talking when and there doesn’t need to be all of the descriptors (since it’s written in first person).

Splat, while not for everyone was one of those books that I wasn’t sure what to expect and in the end, I’m glad I went into it with an open mind.

  • The Wind

  • Tales from a Revolution: West-Florida
  • By: Lars D. H. Hedbor
  • Narrated by: Shamaan Casey
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

Gabriel is a simple sailor, doing the bidding of his Captain and King, when he is swept up in a storm that changes his life in ways that he could never have anticipated. Carlotta yearns for her lost home, and is searching for her lost husband, but both remain elusive in a world that has been turned upside-down by forces far outside of her control. When the storm that is Governor Bernardo de Gálvez breaks over them both, neither will ever be the same - and nor will their world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Makes history so much fun

  • By KD on 10-17-18

Historical Fiction Done Right

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-18

While not typically in genres that I read – The Wind was an awesome tale of Revolutionary War-time West-Florida and is really a story about people.

In the introductory chapters, we learn that there is a storm and that Gabriel lands on a beach in an attempt to shelter from the storm. In the morning a woman finds and greets him while looking for her lost husband. She heals Gabriel out with the help of her father. Once we get into the story we find out that there is much more going on (and really anything more would be a spoiler!)

Hedbor’s storytelling is just that – it’s reminiscent of the older stories that you hear from “way back when”. Obviously, he’s telling a story about a long time ago but you get that authentic and honest feeling when you listen to it. He was able to bring a story about a time and a place that I don’t know much about and draw me deep into the sand and the ocean of that area.

I think with the popularity of Hamilton – this era of history is going to become more and more popular and Hedbor’s The Wind is just one of many Revolutionary War timed stories. I love the fact that he picks a certain place and just goes deep into it. He brings stories that you definitely didn’t hear or read in History class and makes them jump off of the page. I can honestly say, growing up in Pennsylvania that I knew very little about Florida (or the Spanish’s involvement in some of the battles). But after reading The Wind I feel like I know more (even though the story is fictional) and it makes me want to read more on the subject.

Couple this with the narration of Shamaan Casey and you have a rousing tale that’s well performed. The combination of Hedbor’s writing style and Casey’s ability to make the story jump off the page and you have a Historical Fiction book that really stands out.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Kill Process

  • By: William Hertling
  • Narrated by: Jane Cramer
  • Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 774
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 711
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 713

By day, Angie, a 20-year veteran of the tech industry, is a data analyst at Tomo, the world's largest social networking company; by night, she exploits her database access to profile domestic abusers and kill the worst of them. She can't change her own traumatic past, but she can save other women. When Tomo introduces a deceptive new product that preys on users' fears to drive up its own revenue, Angie sees Tomo for what it really is - another evil abuser.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great on Many Levels

  • By Carl on 07-20-16

What A Thrill

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

Kill Process was like 5 books rolled into one. It was one of those books that I had to take in bite-sized chunks because I didn’t want it to end. I found this book because of Hertling’s Avogadro Corp books. I must have bought it months ago because when I saw the second book in this series while prepping my weekly New and Notable posts I was surprised and thrilled to see it in my library.

Kill Process tells the story of Angie, a 45-year-old hacker/programmer with lots of problems. She works for Tomo (basically a fictional Facebook) by day and at night she kills off domestic abusers in mysterious ways. That’s just the first part of the book (and what could have been its own book). She’s introduced to a new product that Tomo wants to introduce and decides that she can no longer work for such a disingenuous company and strikes it off on her own to try and compete with the tech giant. What follows would be a spoiler but is full of a wild ride of a story from beginning to end.

Kill Process is Hertlings best book I’ve read yet. He fills the pages with perfect examples of tech, white and black hat hacking, real SQL database queries, and lots of other techno-jargon that would give people who work in the industry that “feel good” feeling knowing how much Hertling knows and is able to shove into the book. Think The Martian for space/science but for computers and tech. It definitely had a Mr. Robot feel (without the distinctive split personalities) especially when it came to the hacks that Angie described. It also had a bit of a Fight Club feel (also without the same distinctive split personalities) but the “take down the man” feel. It throws in a lot of other things from a lot of other sources but the biggest thing that it felt was real. Sure, Tomo is not Facebook, but it is. They know everything about us, the way that Hertling describes the way that they keep users, not because they want to stay, but because it’s where all their friends just hit a little too close to home. Throw in the recent data breaches and other similarly pitched products by Facebook and it’s a terrifyingly real depiction of where we could be right now without even knowing it.

I work in the tech industry (specifically in and around online advertising) and the scene where Angie talked about using data to figure out that moving an ad 3 degrees in Cincinnati (I think that was where she said) caused a higher click-through rate hit a little too close to home for me (but also made me realize just how good Hertling’s research and knowledge of the industry is.

Another thing that I think Hertling hit on the head with Kill Process was the psychological feelings, reactions, and inner thoughts that Angie had after enduring what she endured with her husband. Even the conversations with her therapist were definitely taken from real therapy sessions and ways that people can calm anxiety among other issues. The repeated scenes of flashbacks, reactions, and irrational thoughts that Angie describes feeling were absolutely perfect. So perfect that I wonder if they would cause a real trigger for others who have been abused (physically or emotionally). My wife was never in anything that rough, but there are still things that she does (where she sits in a restaurant is a good example) that Hertling perfected with Angie.

I know that the second book in this series was just released, but I need to take a mental break for a few days. I will hopefully read it before the end of 2018 (but no promises). Hertling is on the top of his game interweaving the Avagadro world with the Tomo/Tapestry world mentioning Avagadro numerous times and spurring that little memory bank from reading some of the Avogadro Corp books.

A fantastic technothriller that will stick with me for a long time. Hertling’s Kill Process is one of the best books in the genre I’ve read in a long time.

  • The Carnival of the Night

  • By: Nicholas Carey
  • Narrated by: Christopher Graybill
  • Length: 3 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Some call it purgatory, others know it as the in-between, but for those poor souls who are trapped there eternally it is simply: The Carnival - macabre mockery where night is never-ending, and a sadistic creature known as the Fool rules with an iron fist. And the Fool has one rule: No one leaves the Carnival. Ever. Christopher, the latest arrival thrust reluctantly through the gates, is certain that he doesn't belong there, and he's damn sure he's not going to be staying. To have any chance of escaping, he must confront not only the Fool, but his own dark past.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Story That Begs To Be Read In One Sitting

  • By Brian on 11-19-18

A Story That Begs To Be Read In One Sitting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-18

At the time of writing this review, there were 58 5-star reviews (out of 58). I’ll add at least number 59. I won’t say that I went into this skeptical, but that’s a hell of a lot of 5-star reviews for a book.

Carnival of the Night was one of those stories that just builds and builds and builds. It starts off almost unassuming but by the end you find yourself wanting to flip forward (or skip forward in my case) to the end just to see what happens.

This was my first book by author Nicholas Carey and it will not be my last. He wrote one heck of a story that I had a hard time putting down. Thankfully it’s a short story/novella so I didn’t have to wait too long to get to the end.

Apparently, this story started on reddit (upon checking out some of the other reviews) and I’m glad that I waited until the entire thing was finished and produced into an audiobook because I wouldn’t have been able to just read it piece by piece. Carey tells a story that begs to be finished in one sitting.

Overall, a great story that was both well written and well performed. I thought that Christopher Graybill did a wonderful job helping Carey's words jump off of the page an into my ears. He was able to give the story that little bit of an edge that had me on the edge of my seat.

  • Lullaby

  • By: Jonathan Maberry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15,161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,896
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13,904

A young couple buys a beautiful house by a picturesque lake in the Catskills, looking to escape the bustle of the city to raise their newborn baby. It is a perfect place for a fresh start. Except that nothing is ever as perfect as it seems. As autumn nights close in around their home, they learn that darkness takes many forms. And sometimes that darkness is hungry. New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Maberry delivers an unsettling Audible Original that will give listeners the Halloween creeps all year round.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • I guess there’s a reason it’s free

  • By Katie Washington on 10-05-18

Lullaby Will Haunt Your Dreams

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-18

I had just finished a book, I knew I was going to be up for another hour so I perused my Audible Library on my phone. I came across the Audible Original. I think it was from October, but I knew I had to give it a try. Paul Stokes (the Audiobook Reviewer) raves about Maberry’s work (especially the Joe Ledger series) so it didn’t take much to twist my arm to start this one.

I started it and obviously finished it in one sitting… right before bed. This wasn’t the best idea because Maberry wrote a story that freaked me out just enough that I had to stay up even later to stop thinking about it.

It had adult themes and some cursing if I’m not mistaken – but it was just a gritty short story that freaked me out. It reminded me a bit of the John W. Dennehy’s books I’ve read. They make you think but also make you look around right before you shut off the lights for bed.

The imagery in Lullaby is perfect. You feel like you are in the house with them as things start to happen. You feel like you can see the rocking and see the arm. Maberry just crushes it with that.

And throw in Scott Brick’s performance and… goosebumps. I loved it and it made this book jump off of my phone and right into my memory.