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Glenda @ Hanging by a Book

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  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 54
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  • Killers of the Flower Moon

  • The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
  • By: David Grann
  • Narrated by: Will Patton, Ann Marie Lee, Danny Campbell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,234
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7,462
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,434

In the 1920s the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An outstanding story, highly recommended

  • By S. Blakely on 06-22-17

Three narrators...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-17

I like the first two, but the third narrator’s vocal quality is not what I expect when listening to an audio book. His voice is grainy, which diminishes the quality of the performance.

  • Stamped from the Beginning

  • The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
  • By: Ibram X. Kendi
  • Narrated by: Christopher Dontrell Piper
  • Length: 19 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 775
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 692
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 690

Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America - more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, tiring narration.

  • By Jan on 06-21-17

Missing Epilogue

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-17

Where is the epilogue? It's missing from the audiobook, and I submit--given the author's confessions about his own racist ideas in the introduction--it is an inherent part of the thesis. Leaving out the epilogue is a glaring omission. I feel as though I've been robbed of an important part of the book.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful