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Marie

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  • 1,112
  • helpful votes
  • 336
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  • Lord James Harrington and the Spring Mystery

  • By: Lynn Florkiewicz
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56

It's 1958, and Lord James and his wife, Beth, are hosting the annual spring fair. Then wealthy recluse Delphine Brooks-Hunter is murdered. James is summoned to the reading of her will and is tasked with solving an intriguing riddle. Meanwhile, Beth tackles her own mystery after discovering a homeless man suffering from amnesia. As they delve deeper, a number of questions emerge. What links Delphine to the fairground folk? Who would harm such a refined lady? Are rumours of World War espionage true?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lord Harrington is not Bond, ignore cover art

  • By Marie on 04-28-18

Lord Harrington is not Bond, ignore cover art

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

If you are expecting a suave, debonaire Lord Harrington, this is not the book for you, regardless of the cover art. Lord James and his wife run posh a hotel in his ancestral home and are very involved in local culture. Both are good characters. Plots are entertaining. The books are really country cozies. Enjoyable listens for the most part.

My 3 star rating for the narrator is not because he is a bad narrator, but because I have listened to him narrate most of Margery Allingham's Albert Campion series. At times he drifts from Jame's pleasant voice into Campion's nasally twang, and I find it disconcerting. For those who haven't listened to the Campion books, it probably won't be an issue.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Seven for a Secret

  • A John the Eunuch Mystery
  • By: Mary Reed, Eric Mayer
  • Narrated by: James Adams
  • Length: 8 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

As Lord Chamberlain, John spent his days counseling Emperor Justinian while passing the small hours of night in conversation with the solemn-eyed little girl depicted in a mosaic on his study wall. He never expected to meet her in a public square - or afterwards, to find her red-dyed corpse in a subterranean cistern.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Good

  • By Wadie on 07-21-08

Ends in a whimper

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

This was my first John the Eunuch Mystery and by the end I was a bit lost about who and what John was and who his family was.For instance, it wasn't explained about how and when John had become a eunuch until far into the book. While authors shouldn't drown the reader in back story, it might have helped the reader understand his reaction to other eunuchs and his relationship to Cornelia. I think it might pay to start at the beginning of the series.

I enjoyed the story until the end, which was more than disappointing. The plot includes intriguing crimes(which do get a bit confusing by the end) and lots of questionable characters. The finale doesn't do the rest of the book justice. It ends with a whimper. I might try an earlier book in the series because I did enjoy the setting and the characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Death Comes to the Village

  • A Kurland St. Mary Mystery
  • By: Catherine Lloyd
  • Narrated by: Susannah Tyrrell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 168
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167

A wounded soldier and a rector's daughter discover strange goings-on in the sleepy village of Kurland St. Mary in Catherine Lloyd's charming Regency-set mystery debut. Major Robert Kurland has returned to the quiet vistas of his village home to recuperate from the horrors of Waterloo. However injured his body may be, his mind is as active as ever. Too active, perhaps. When he glimpses a shadowy figure from his bedroom window struggling with a heavy load, the tranquil faade of the village begins to loom sinister....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Happy Surprise!

  • By Sara on 03-27-14

awful narrator, even after increasing the speed

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-18

Interesting characters, predictable plot, hated the ending. almost stopped listening because of narrator. If you do listen, increase speed to 1.10. the heroine sounded masculine and her voice was unappealing.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Brat Farrar

  • By: Josephine Tey
  • Narrated by: Carole Boyd
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,462
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,224
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,220

A stranger enters the inner sanctum of the Ashby family posing as Patrick Ashby, the heir to the family’s sizeable fortune. The stranger, Brat Farrar, has been carefully coached on Patrick’s mannerisms, appearance and every significant detail of Patrick’s early life, up to his 13th year when he disappeared and was thought to have drowned himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great all around

  • By Catherine on 10-23-11

Simply the Best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-18

Josephine Tey has a talent for writing few mystery writers of today will ever achieve, no matter how many books they sell. Her words flow, creating pictures in your mind and pulling you into the story.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Murder in an Irish Village

  • By: Carlene O'Connor
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lennon
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,954
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,604
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,586

In the small village of Kilbane, County Cork, Ireland, Natalie's Bistro has always been warm and welcoming. Nowadays 22-year-old Siobhan O'Sullivan runs the family bistro named for her mother, along with her five siblings, after the death of their parents in a car crash almost a year ago. It's been a rough year for the O'Sullivans, but it's about to get rougher. One morning, as they're opening the bistro, they discover a man seated at a table with a pair of hot pink barber scissors protruding from his chest.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Mystery

  • By Jill, NM on 10-21-16

Should be marketed as YA book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-31-18

The O'Sullivan Six are the Boxcar Children of the 21st century. Orphaned when their parents die in a car accident, the oldest child, James and our heroine, Siobahn, are guardians for the four younger children. Are we really supposed to accept that a group of children and young adults, the youngest a ten-year-old and the oldest (James) with a serious alcohol problem are surviving on their own and running a bistro. Our heroine, Siobahn, (who is 18 I think because she wanted to go to university) apparently makes the best brown bread in town (as we are told over and over and over) is never in the kitchen, and we never see her make even a small loaf. The 10 year old has to wash dishes while the others wait tables and apparently make food. The younger ones seem to run the bistro with no assistance while Siobahn is out tracking down criminals. And they never go to school. I wonder what social services would have to say about that. Okay, you can tell the whole setup annoyed me.

So then there is the murder, which starts out to be interesting but devolves into Siobahn going down a list of possible suspects she made with her younger siblings accusing each one in turn of committing the murder, without even considering if anyone has an alibi. And not to reveal a spoiler but naturally she thinks it could be anyone except the person who actually did it. In the end, she ends up forcing people to reveal personal issues they are having that are unrelated to the crime. She withholds information from the main law enforcement officer, who she has a serious crush on, she puts her younger siblings in danger, and over time, she becomes unlikable.

I don't understand why this book is marketed as an adult mystery. It would be more appropriate in the YA category. Young people take on the adult world and succeed. Sort of.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • White Christmas with a Wobbly Knee

  • The Belchester Chronicles, Book 2
  • By: Andrea Frazer
  • Narrated by: Patricia Gallimore
  • Length: 6 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 181

The second in the series featuring a madcap pair of amateur sleuths and a delightful outpouring of upper-class English eccentricities - with the odd murder thrown in. Lady Amanda Golightly, eccentric resident of the sprawling Belchester Towers, has a new venture: guided tours. To celebrate she invites a horde of old chums to a trial run at Christmas, complete with tasty nibbles. However, things don't go to plan - a dead guest is discovered slumped on the library table.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I want a Beecham in my employ!

  • By chuknzig on 01-19-17

Still Fun, Still Flawed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

Like the first book in the series, this volume is full of eccentric and a bit over-the-top characters. The dialogue is witty and the situations are humorous. I found myself laughing out loud at times. I enjoyed most of it and will probably listen to more. But it is not without a couple of major flaws.

As with the first book, if you don't listen closely for the very few clues about when the story takes place, you would think it was set in the first half of the 20th century. Based on the few details our heroine, Amanda Golightly, drops about when she was born (after WWII) and the fact she is now taking a government pension, however, it must be at least 2005. Some of the actions and attitudes of the main characters are so out of date, the story seems to take place in a much earlier period. Part of the problem is that people, including Amanda herself, keep referring to her as an old lady. Sixty-five is hardly in your dotage anymore, but both Amanda and Chummy act and think like they must be in their 80s. Unfortunately, the narrator reads them and their friends like they are in their 80s and it is confusing at times. And most 65-year-olds these days are as seduced by their cell phones as are younger people.

The narrator has a problem with differentiating voices for some characters. All the older male characters begin to sound alike. And Amanda and Chummy still sound like they are in their 80s.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Strangeways to Oldham

  • The Belchester Chronicles, Book 1
  • By: Andrea Frazer
  • Narrated by: Patricia Gallimore
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 305
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 274

Lady Amanda Golightly of Belchester Towers is a person in complete contrast to the stereotypical image of her upper-class breeding. She is short, portly, and embarrassingly forthright. On a visit to a local nursing home, she unexpectedly discovers a long-lost friend, Hugo Cholmondley-Crichton-Crump - and stumbles upon a murder. The pair turn to sleuthing after Lady Amanda reports her appalling discovery to the local police inspector, who treats her as a silly old biddy with an overactive imagination.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply fabulous

  • By chuknzig on 01-19-17

Fun But Flawed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

The book is chock full of eccentric and a bit over-the-top characters. The dialogue is witty and the situations are humorous. I enjoyed most of it and will probably listen to more. But it is not without a couple of major flaws.

Unfortunately, if you don't listen closely for the very few clues about when the story takes place, you would think it was set in the first half of the 20th century. Based on the few details our heroine, Amanda Golightly, drops about when she was born (after WWII) and the fact she is now taking a government pension, however, it must be at least 2005. She does have a cell phone but doesn't really understand it or use it much. Some of the actions and attitudes of the main characters are so out of date, the story seems to take place in a much earlier period. Part of the problem is that people, including Amanda herself, keep referring to her as an old lady. Sixty-five is hardly in your dotage anymore, but both Amanda and Chummy act and think like they must be in their 80s. Unfortunately, the narrator reads them and their friends like they are in their 80s and it is confusing at times. And most 65-year-olds these days are as seduced by their cell phones as are younger people.

Not being British, I have to wonder if so many people still ride large tricycles. Cars seem to be more in fashion I would think. Amanda even rides hers in the snow. Really?

I found this same problem in the second book in the series, which at times is laugh out loud funny.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Jacob T. Marley

  • By: R. William Bennett
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,469
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,311
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,293

"Marley was dead to begin with...." These chillingly familiar words begin the classic Christmas tale of remorse and redemption in A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Now R. William Bennett rewinds the story and focuses the spotlight on Scrooge’s miserly business partner, Jacob T. Marley, who was allowed to return as a ghost to warn Scrooge away from his ill-fated path. Why was Marley allowed to return? And why hadn’t he been given the same chance as Ebenezer Scrooge? Or had he?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is my favorite book! I listen to it all year

  • By Lyle K Holden on 08-07-17

Lovely twist on a well known tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know Jacob Marley and experiencing how his relationship with Ebenezer Scrooge helped make Scrooge the mean spirited and parsimonious man he became. While we associate Scrooge with Christmas, this is a story that can be enjoyed at any time. I highly recommend it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Secrets of Wishtide

  • By: Kate Saunders
  • Narrated by: Anna Bentinck
  • Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,935
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,697
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,686

Mrs. Laetitia Rodd, aged 52, is the widow of an archdeacon who makes her living as a highly discreet private investigator. Her brother, Frederick Tyson, is a criminal barrister living in nearby Highgate with his wife and 10 children. Frederick finds the cases, and Laetitia solves them using her arch intelligence and her immaculate cover as an unsuspecting widow. When a case arises involving the son of the highly connected Sir James Calderstone, Laetitia sets off for Lincolnshire undercover as the family's new governess.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Historical intrigue-

  • By Meema on 04-16-17

Too many Vicars and the wrong narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

First, let me say there is absolutely nothing wrong with the narrator as a narrator. That said, the main character is a 52 year old woman and the narrator sounds about 25. I could never picture Mrs. Rodd as an older woman. And in 1852, 52 is not what it is today.

Mrs. Rodd, out gentile detective is the widow of an archdeacon. By the end of the book I was so tired of her telling me what her wonderful Matthew would have done or said that I almost stopped listening. The book is too long for the story and cutting out some of the maudlin memories might make it tighter and keep the story moving. There are vicars everywhere in the book. You would almost think most of the men in England were vicars. And while she is the widow of a arch deacon, Mrs. Rodd's constantly relating the story to religious theme and or sins (of shamed women mostly) was dull. I didn't buy that such a apparently pious woman would associate while so many fallen women (yes there were more fallen women and poor unattractive spinsters than virtuous women in the book). I hope if there is a sequel, Mrs. Rodd finds out that her husband cheated on her. Mean spirited, I know.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Murder for Christmas

  • By: Francis Duncan
  • Narrated by: John Curless
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 74
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 74

Mordecai Tremaine, former tobacconist and perennial lover of romance novels, has been invited to spend Christmas in the sleepy village of Sherbroome at the country retreat of one Benedict Grame. Arriving on Christmas Eve, he finds that the revelries are in full flow - but so too are tensions amongst the assortment of guests. Midnight strikes and the party-goers discover that it's not just presents nestling under the tree...there's a dead body, too. A dead body that bears a striking resemblance to Father Christmas.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More Please

  • By Marie on 10-31-17

More Please

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-17

Murder for Christmas is a great listen. Mordeci Tremaine is a wonderful period detective. This book was originally published in 1949, the second of five Mordeci Tremaine mysteries. The characters are fun, the plot intriguing, and the solution a surprise. This is the only Francis Duncan title available in the US. I hope Audible adds more because I would like to get to know Mordeci better, and find out why he likes to read romance novels.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful