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michael jones

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A comprehensive history of racist ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-19

From Ancient Greece to Obamanation, this book details the long development of racism and antiracism.

Excellent propaganda.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-19

Wonderful book. Should really be common core and taught in schools. History and theory are rolled into one package.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A comprehensive breakdown

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-19-19

We, as a society, make easy and natural mistakes regarding our approach to understanding gender on a variety of levels and this book does an effective job of dispelling as much of them as possible while also teaching us better means of ascertaining where our bad habits lie and how we can better understand the priorities we give ourselves when raising children.

An educated, insular perspective.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-19

Steele lends a view of liberalism from the outside, a fresh take on the experience of straight black men in American institutions, and even a new means of understanding the backlash Democrats experienced from white America after the Civil Rights movement and Vietnam conflict. However, his well-heeled background pre-limits his ability to empathize with poorer black people. This, he may call an unwillingness to dissociate into relativism. The fear of this dissociation is misplaced, as it precludes him walking in other people's shoes. His coach, for example, likely felt ashamed and self-conscious at their interaction, but Steele could only see the power he held from his own point of view. Rather than appreciate the collective trauma of our country, Steele saw an opportunity for advantage. He fails to realize that the master's tools will not dismantle the master's house. Thus, his claim that white racism no longer poses a serious barrier to his black peers. True, there may not be a barrier to him and HIS peers, but to the poorer black community at large, he is not able to articulate their frustration because he has not experienced it first-hand. He will not take it onto himself, lest he dissociate like he did in the swimming pool when he realized he wouldn't swim competitively. He says it was a lack of passion and nothing else. If I may be so bold, I suspect it was the implication his exclusion at the party that a swimming career would be ever more difficult for him for his blackness. He denies this and even vilifies the term "blackness". But being only aware of propriety (what mother says, goes) and the flow of power in his young body, the lesson he took was one of cynicism. From then on, his has been a case of confirming what one believes by seeking the evidence that suits it. Being a black man and highly educated does help him to understand some of the machinations at work. Later chapters reflect on the dehumanization of racism. If only he could see the problem he tasted runs deeper and more insidiously than he could imagine.

Thus Spoke Zarathustra audiobook cover art

Reads like the bible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-19

a culmination of his multiple works leading to an image of what he thinks the future of humanity ought to look like.

Focused on the 20th century

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-19

I hadn't realized I had obtained a version of this book that's centered on recent history. Nonetheless, it illuminates the context leading up to today's controversies quite well and from a dozen perspectives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

The end of a normal man's life.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-19

Totally encapsulates the absurd without explaining it. It's merely being experienced from a safe distance.