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Robert

Atlanta
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  • The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion

  • A Novel
  • By: Fannie Flagg
  • Narrated by: Fannie Flagg
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,342
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,138
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,125

Mrs. Sookie Poole of Point Clear, Alabama, has just married off the last of her daughters and is looking forward to relaxing and perhaps traveling with her husband, Earle. The only thing left to contend with is her mother, the formidable Lenore Simmons Krackenberry. Lenore may be a lot of fun for other people, but is, for the most part, an overbearing presence for her daughter. Then one day, quite by accident, Sookie discovers a secret about her mother's past that knocks her for a loop and suddenly calls into question everything she ever thought she knew about herself, her family, and her future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a fun story!

  • By Lea Zimmerman on 12-06-13

Slow beginning, But picks up speed.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-17

A bit too southern even for this deep South boy. Long on southern stereotype personalities, and a bit short on serious, even though this was, in the end, serious.

  • When Breath Becomes Air

  • By: Paul Kalanithi, Abraham Verghese - foreword
  • Narrated by: Sunil Malhotra, Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,611
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,475
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,421

At the age of 36, on the verge of completing a decade's worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inspirational yet Existential Crisis Inducing

  • By Celia on 05-31-16

Phenomenal non-fiction and beautiful story about life and dying

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-16

One of, if not THE, best books I ever read. Moving, touching, inspiring, well-written, and incredibly upbeat. An inspiring story about living life at its fullest.

The Secret Sense of Wildflower audiobook cover art
  • The Secret Sense of Wildflower

  • By: Susan Gabriel
  • Narrated by: Susan Gabriel
  • Length: 6 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

Set in 1940s Appalachia, The Secret Sense of Wildflower tells the story of Louisa May "Wildflower" McAllister, whose life has been shaped around the recent death of her beloved father in a sawmill accident. While her mother hardens in her grief, Wildflower and her three sisters must cope with their loss themselves, as well as with the demands of daily survival.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I loved this story.

  • By SALLY ANDERS on 12-05-17

Poor Narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-15

What did you like best about The Secret Sense of Wildflower? What did you like least?

Perhaps if I had read this instead of listening to it, I would have liked it. Dull, monotone, drone expressionless narration.
Story is OK, but not gripping or especially literary.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

boring. almost quit on her

Could you see The Secret Sense of Wildflower being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

no

  • The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

  • By: Nadia Hashimi
  • Narrated by: Gin Hammond
  • Length: 16 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,090
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 981
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 987

Nadia Hashimi's literary debut is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Lisa See. In Kabul, 2007, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inner View of Hidden Women

  • By SydSavvy on 01-04-15

Superb

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-15

Wonderful sad and happy story of women in Afghanistan now and in parallel- contemporary and early 1900's. Parallel stores of young girl/woman and of her great-great-grandmother. Beautifully told.

  • The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

  • By: Gabrielle Zevin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,716
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,029
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,027

The irascible A. J. Fikry, owner of Island Books - the only bookstore on Alice Island - has already lost his wife. Now his most prized possession, a rare book, has been stolen from right under his nose in the most embarrassing of circumstances. The store itself, it seems, will be next to go. One night upon closing, he discovers a toddler in his children’s section with a note from her mother pinned to her Elmo doll: I want Maya to grow up in a place with books and among people who care about such kinds of things. I love her very much, but I can no longer take care of her.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Tale for Booksellers

  • By B. Leon on 04-15-14

GoodBook With a fantastic ending

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-15

Very well narrated. A warm story with a fantastically powerful and unexpected ending. Very well drawn characters revolve around books and each other.

  • Kalooki Nights

  • By: Howard Jacobson
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 17 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

Two young friend, Max Glickman and Manny Washinski, get together in an abandoned air-raid shelter and create a comic-book history of Jewish suffering. Years later, Manny is in jail for a horrible crime and Max is a comic book artist. After Manny's release from prison decades later, the two meet again when Max is hired by a production company to write a film treatment based on Manny's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Laugh-Out-Loud Seriousness

  • By Bette on 06-27-12

Membership in the tribe is necessary to absorbthis

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-11

What would have made Kalooki Nights better?

Less inwardly focused on tribal jokes, stories, habits,

Has Kalooki Nights turned you off from other books in this genre?

No

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

I suppose. My sympathies to the narrator.

You didn???t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

None that I could discern

Any additional comments?

As an amazon reviewer said,

  • Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

  • A Novel
  • By: Jamie Ford
  • Narrated by: Feodor Chin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,485
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,274
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,285

In the opening pages of Jamie Ford's stunning debut, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Henry Lee comes upon a crowd gathered outside the Panama Hotel, once the gateway to Seattle's Japantown. It has been boarded up for decades, but now the new owner has made an incredible discovery: the belongings of Japanese families, left when they were rounded up and sent to internment camps during World War II. As Henry looks on, the owner opens a Japanese parasol.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet

  • By Christopher on 04-02-09

Engaging and Lovely. Highly recommend.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-09

A poignant, endearing, complex, imaginative, and well-executed plot with wonderful fully-developed characters. Flash backs from adult lives are interleaved seamlessly and cleverly as two 12/13 year olds come of age under very difficult circumstances. Some characters are seriously flawed in realistic ways. One set of flawed parents is complemented by another set of parents cut out of whole cloth. Adult friends of the children add a special dimension in unexpected ways. Some of the objects and events loom large and carry their heartbreaking meaning from the west coast internment of Japanese-American US citizens. I would be surprised if you don't simultaneously laugh and get misty-eyed from the last few words spoken at the end of the book. Audio is very well narrated. It is as good a young adult/parent/any-adult book as is the excellent The BookThief.

38 of 42 people found this review helpful

  • Serena

  • By: Ron Rash
  • Narrated by: Phil Gigante
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 798
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 632
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 642

The year is 1929, and newlyweds George and Serena Pemberton arrive in the North Carolina mountains to create a timber empire, vowing to let no one stand in their way, especially those newly rallying around Teddy Roosevelt's nascent environmental movement.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Subtle Genius

  • By David Shear on 08-21-13

Gothic Garbage with Cardboard Characters

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-09

Comparisons to Macbeth and Greek tragedy notwithstanding, this novel is a waste of time. Its prose is pedestrian. That it is on the NYT's Best Seller List says more about the tastes of the American public than the quality of the book. Serena is the ultimate sociopath. Other authors create "bad" characters but manage to invest them with characteristics and personalities which make them interesting in spite of their flaws -- not so with Serena.
The narrator affects a grating southern accent which he uses for the locals as well as the Bostonian Pemberton.
The book deserves a bodice ripping cover to convey its nature.

15 of 25 people found this review helpful

  • The Book Thief

  • By: Markus Zusak
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,323
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,224
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,261

It's just a small story really, about, among other things, a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist: books.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glad I took a chance.

  • By Robert on 08-20-11

A Must Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-07

Engaging, moving, delightful and well-written. This book deserves a place among the best.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Gilgamesh

  • A New English Version
  • By: Stephen Mitchell - translator
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 4 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,703
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,186
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,181

This brilliant new treatment of the world's oldest epic is a literary event on par with Seamus Heaney's wildly popular Beowulf translation. Esteemed translator and best-selling author Stephen Mitchell energizes a heroic tale so old it predates Homer's Iliad by more than a millennium.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A defense of this "translation"

  • By George on 07-16-08

Fun and Enlightening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-06

An unknown poet writes the world's oldest known epic poem. (2 hours for story; 2 hours for interpretation and explanation by the editor.) Superbly narrated by George Guidall in what is undoubtedly the way most received the story in its time. Uniquely and appropriately audio. The narrative pace translates beautifully to an easy to listen to story(publisher's notes say that earlier translations are stiff and academic). Fun and Enlightening -- not to worry if poetry puts you off -- this story flows beautifully. The interpretations and explanations of editor are worthwhile. I question his easy-to-ignore comparisons to very current events that can only be judged appropriately in the lens of history and his speculations on a homoerotic relationship between the two main characters. Very worthwhile.

16 of 21 people found this review helpful