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Darina

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Biology of power

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-19

"Wild seed" is my second book by O.Butler and only first novel of hers. However, the feeling of recognition and appreciation is already strong. Her stories, no matter how long or short, seem to envelop me. They have very clear plot, clear idea - but the world around it creates a pattern that seems to reach in all directions and touch every imaginable part of the world.
What I took from it, what I can't stop thinking about is the relation between humans and power. What gives inevitably takes. We shape what's around us but in return it inevitably shapes us. Yes, it's a story of greater than life people, but sometimes it was the short-lived ones around them, that became the flesh of the book, that replayed their relations on the grand scene of life. And I see beautiful mastery in shaping the narration in a way that convoluted both personal and global in a way I won't be able to put the two apart.
A smaller scaled thing that enchanted me, however, was the scientific look at the magical, the description of sells and organs changing, of dolphin skin and bones being recreated and appreciated, of body getting old and heart wearing out. The main character is perfectly real from the very first lines we, readers, meet her. Her strong spirit and her compassion makes us fall for her just like men and women and the spirit of her world. And these glimpses of her power and her relation to it make her even more interesting, make her unique.

As for the narration, Dion Graham, though I initially wasn't a great fan of his voice and tone, has done a great job immersing me into the story, made me forget it was just one man speaking for all the characters. Totally worth getting used to.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A memoir

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-18

This book is exactly what it says it is - a memoir, a diary. It’s very personal but through love-hate relationship with parents, through stories of loss and love it describes a very strange and scary time for a beautiful country.
Besides, the reading is very good (envy Mrs Nafisi's students even more now!).
However the book may be difficult to read, because it's too private and doesn’t really feel like "literature", like a novelization of life (as "Lolita in Tehran" do) but more like a confession with a bit of moralization.