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Darren Lathen

Garland, TX
  • 9
  • reviews
  • 37
  • helpful votes
  • 30
  • ratings
  • 1632

  • Ring of Fire, Book 1
  • By: Eric Flint
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 19 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,847
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,686
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,696

New York Times best-selling author Eric Flint has received glowing critical praise for his Ring of Fire alternate history series. In this first installment, a West Virginia town is transported from the year 2000 to 1631 Germany at the height of the Thirty Years’ War. Thrust into conflict, the town residents must also contend with moral issues such as who should be considered a citizen.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • NOT ALL THAT BAD

  • By Randall on 11-26-18

General storyline written by 12 year old

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

This was frustrating. I wanted to like it. It made me curious to learn more of the history of the 30-years war. The historical characters and plots surrounding them are not half bad. But the "modern" cast of castaway characters are just plain awful. People are divided up into the white hats and black hats. A black hat is BAD guy. Every motivation, every action, every word of the black hats is bad. The white hats are always good and right and true, oh, yeah, and they're all union dudes, so naturally anyone who has ever been a business owner (read: management) is BAD guy.

Contrast this approach with Harry Turtledove, "Southern Victory" series (also excellently read by George Guidall). In that series the reader is given a much more complete picture of characters -- a picture that demonstrates how characters are both good and bad; how they are often constructed by their experiences and upbringings. You might admire a character for certain aspects and just be furious at him for others. In comparison, this story falls flat.

27 of 29 people found this review helpful

  • The Outsider

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,815
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,712
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,570

An 11-year-old boy's violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City's most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Will Patton great - story so so

  • By Randall on 06-19-18

Outstanding story with exceptional performance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

So there's a new Stephen King book on audible. You know you can count on great characters and a fascinating story with prose that transports you right into the scene. Match that with Will Patton reading though and everything becomes real. Send this audio book to your friends and they will serve The Audible forever. :)

0 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Misbehaving

  • The Making of Behavioral Economics
  • By: Richard Thaler
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 13 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,473
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,908
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,872

Richard H. Thaler has spent his career studying the radical notion that the central agents in the economy are humans - predictable, error-prone individuals. Misbehaving is his arresting, frequently hilarious account of the struggle to bring an academic discipline back down to earth - and change the way we think about economics, ourselves, and our world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm a lot smarter than I was before

  • By Barrie Bramley on 10-04-15

Interesting from start to finish

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-18

First, I have to give kudos to the narrator. I believed I was listening to the author until I watched a video of Thaler and it was obviously not him. outstanding presentation!

The book was thoroughly engaging for this non-economist. Though there are plenty of places I'd like to argue against some of his conclusions, one can follow his thinking and insights.

  • Argumentation: The Study of Effective Reasoning, 2nd Edition

  • By: David Zarefsky, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: David Zarefsky
  • Length: 12 hrs and 15 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 761
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 658
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 647

What is effective reasoning? And how can it be done persuasively? These questions have been asked for thousands of years, yet some of the best thinking on reasoning and argumentation is recent and represents a break from the past. These 24 engaging lectures teach you how to reason, how to persuade others that what you think is right, and how to judge and answer the arguments of others - and how they will judge yours.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If you are on the fence, Get it!

  • By liam on 08-22-13

Better with some supporting docs

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-18

This is a well done course. I question how much I'll be able to retain from just listening through.

  • A History of Russia: From Peter the Great to Gorbachev

  • By: Mark Steinberg, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark Steinberg
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 953
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 868
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 855

It's difficult to imagine a nation with a history more compelling for Americans than Russia. Before the collapse of the Soviet Union, this was the nation against which we measured our own nation's values and power and with whom war, if it ever came, could spell unimaginable catastrophe for our planet.Yet many Americans have never had the opportunity to study Russia in depth, and to see how the forces of history came together to shape a future so different from the dreams of most ordinary Russian people, eager to see their nation embrace Western values of progress, human rights, and justice.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not story-telling but history-telling at its best

  • By Shah Alam on 10-22-13

Well delivered history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-17

One of the marks of a good survey course like this is leaving the user with key places he might like to look deeper. It both piques your curiosity, and leaves some breadcrumbs to follow when starting your search. This course accomplished that task many times. Enjoyable, well researched, and engagingly delivered.

  • A False Dawn

  • By: Tom Lowe
  • Narrated by: Michael David Axtell
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 170
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 170

Before the death of his wife, Sean O'Brien makes a promise to her that he has no plans to break - until he starts building a new life in an old cabin on a remote stretch of a tropical river in the heart of Florida. It's there that he discovers an injured young woman who whispers a cryptic message into his ear.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • First in a series

  • By Luanne Ollivier on 09-25-15

Decent Story, could be better

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-17

Found the overall story arc compelling enough to keep going, and probably even try another in the same series. However, there are some rather glaring issues. First, the women are poorly written characters -- hard to imagine a lady police detective as mentally delicate as in this book. She was the worst, but none of the female characters really seemed real to me.
A few times the pontification of the main character, or his indignant commentary goes on a little too long.

  • Mastering Logical Fallacies

  • How to Win Arguments and Refute Misleading Logic
  • By: Mike Livingston
  • Narrated by: Nathan W Wood
  • Length: 1 hr and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 39

Would you like to discover the secrets politicians, lawyers, writers, religious figures, and the media use to make false arguments sound real? Do you get infuriated when a spouse or friend uses misleading words to prove their points in arguments? Would you like to discover exactly what to say and how to say it when false logic presents itself? If you answered yes - then this book is exactly what you've been waiting for!

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not all rhetoric is argument

  • By Darren Lathen on 03-15-17

Not all rhetoric is argument

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-17

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

When I see the word 'mastering' in the title, I think of a deeper dive into fallacies, to learn them almost from a mathematical level. Instead, this is more of a rapid fire name and example with just the briefest of descriptions.

Has Mastering Logical Fallacies turned you off from other books in this genre?

No, but I'll be reading reviews more carefully in the future -- that and the scant time on this audiobook should have been a giveaway that it would not have the depth I was looking for.

Have you listened to any of Nathan W Wood’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Haven't listened to this narrator before.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Mastering Logical Fallacies?

I would cut about half the political examples in favor of more obvious, generic examples on only drive to politics when necessary.

Any additional comments?

The author uses a LOT of political examples in his work. Although he does make a good effort to be fair using examples from both major political parties in the US, it gets a little tedious. Additionally, in the author's quest for political examples, some of the rhetoric he slaps with the label of "fallacy" is actually non-argumentative speaking. If a politician says to the crowd, "what a wonderful crowd", that's not an argument, it's just phatic communication.
While I share the author's frustration at the lack of logical argumentation in the current American political climate, the examination of fallacy should not be presented in the heat of that frustration, rather with a more careful, academic study.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Nixon's Secrets

  • By: Roger Stone, Mike Colapietro
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 20 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 131
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 116

Learn the inside scoop on Watergate, the Ford Pardon, and the 18-minute Gap. Roger Stone, The New York Times best-selling author of The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ, gives the inside scoop on Nixon’s rise and fall in Watergate in his new book Nixon’s Secrets. Stone charts Nixon’s rise from election to Congress in 1946 to the White House in 1968 after his razor-thin loss to John Kennedy in 1960, his disastrous campaign for Governor of California in 1962, and the greatest comeback in American Presidential history.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Organization is key

  • By Darren Lathen on 02-23-17

Organization is key

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-17

Would you try another book from Roger Stone and Mike Colapietro and/or Stephen Hoye?

Probably not, if I did I would pay careful attention to reviews before buying.

Would you ever listen to anything by Roger Stone and Mike Colapietro again?

Maybe, but not my first choice.

What does Stephen Hoye bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The reading was pretty good; however, whether due to writing or narration, it was often difficult to determine when the first person quotes (the longer ones) were attributed to the author or to another source the author was citing.

Any additional comments?

It's unorganized. Assumes event knowledge in the reader that someone my age (mid-40s) might not have.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Ottoman Empire

  • The Untold Story to Its Rise and Fall
  • By: Jack Johnson
  • Narrated by: Jim Johnston
  • Length: 3 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    1.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    1.5 out of 5 stars 5

The Ottoman Empire was a strong world power for over 600 years beginning in the late 13th century. How did it rise from one man who was given charge of a small parcel of land to an empire that spanned three continents? Why did it begin to lose battle after battle, eventually reaching a point where it was beaten back by its enemies? Which sultans presented the empire with the tools for success and which destroyed the unity? What contributed to its demise?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Inaccurate historical details, worthless...

  • By Emre Gurcan on 10-17-16

An 8th Grader's History Report

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-17

What would have made The Ottoman Empire better?

Detail, depth, an author with better storytelling chops.

What could Jack Johnson have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

You just can't tell a compelling history of an empire spanning 600 years in a 3 1/2 hour recitation of who the leaders were. Additionally, facts were simply wrong - as another reviewer mentioned, in the first chapter Johnson asserts that the Ottoman Turks BUILT the Hagia Sophia -- yeah, that's why the name is so Greek sounding right?

What didn’t you like about Jim Johnston’s performance?

I can't really criticize the narrator too much when the material is this bad, but he did sound like he was reading a middle schooler history report.

Any additional comments?

I hope someone with better academic and storytelling credentials will put together an audio history of the Ottoman Empire along the lines of The Great Courses or The Modern Scholar series.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful