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  • Shaman

  • The Cole Trilogy, Book 2
  • By: Noah Gordon
  • Narrated by: Ben Owen
  • Length: 22 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41

Dr. Robert Judson Cole travels from his ravaged Scotland homeland, through the operating rooms of Boston, to the cabins of frontier Illinois. In the wilderness he befriends the starving remnants of the Sauk tribe, who have fled their reservation. In the process, he absorbs their culture and learns native remedies that enrich the classical medical education he received at Edinburgh University. He marries a remarkable settler woman he had saved from illness.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fair is fair, right?

  • By Amazon Customer on 01-30-18

Interesting at times

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-18

This is a historical novel about a physician in the 1800’s. Some interesting and well done parts but the plot meanders and occasionally loses its way. Nice description of Medicine and living conditions of the times. A bit of a stretch that the doc should be involved in both the Underground Railroad and Gettysburg.

The narrator is very good but as in The Physician he mispronounces both medical and Hebrew terms at times.

Overall fairly good but not as good as The Physician, the first book in the series. I won’t be going on to the third book.

  • The Physician

  • The Cole Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Noah Gordon
  • Narrated by: Richard Higgins
  • Length: 24 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92

A child holds the hand of his dying mother and is terrified, aware something is taking her. Orphaned and given to an itinerant barber-surgeon, Rob Cole becomes a fast-talking swindler, peddling a worthless medicine. But as he matures, his strange gift - an acute sensitivity to impending death - never leaves him, and he yearns to become a healer. Arab madrassas are the only authentic medical schools, and he makes his perilous way to Persia.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • From a Persian

  • By Lilian Piruzan on 01-01-18

Great story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-17

Wonderful historical fiction depicting life in the dark ages of Europe with comparison and contrast to the Islamic civilization. Interesting insights into the status of medicine and the condition of Jews of the era. Knocked a point off of narration which was otherwise excellent for many poor pronunciations of Medical and Hebrew words. I have no idea how he did in Persian pronunciation.

  • The Blank Slate

  • The Modern Denial of Human Nature
  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 22 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,812
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,349
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,328

In The Blank Slate, Steven Pinker, one of the world's leading experts on language and the mind, explores the idea of human nature and its moral, emotional, and political colorings. With characteristic wit, lucidity, and insight, Pinker argues that the dogma that the mind has no innate traits, denies our common humanity and our individual preferences, replaces objective analyses of social problems with feel-good slogans, and distorts our understanding of politics, violence, parenting, and the arts.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent, as expected

  • By Carolyn on 05-30-14

Re-reading a great book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-17

I read this over10 years ago and now re-read on Audible. Pinker builds a solid intellectual argument that buries the twentieth century departure from experience and reason. It is fascinating in 2017 to read of the hysteria and personal attacks launched by the promoters of the blank slate and its accompaniments against anyone who would question their worldview or authority. You can cut and paste these same ad hominem attacks onto any one of a number of individuals who have dared to challenge the received academic and scientific wisdom. I will rely on the reader to decide which those might be.

  • The Wrong Stuff

  • The Adventures and Misadventures of an 8th Air Force Aviator
  • By: Truman Smith
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 925
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 833
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 840

Between April and July 1944, Truman Smith flew 35 bombing missions over France and Germany. He was only 20 years old. Although barely adults, Smith and his peers worried about cramming a lifetime's worth of experience into every free night, each knowing he probably would not survive the next bombing mission. Written with blunt honesty, wry humor, and insight, The Wrong Stuff is Smith's gripping memoir of that time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Action, suspense, and history

  • By Allan on 03-17-15

Amazingly entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

This guy is interesting and entertaining. He was certainly made of the right stuff dealing with the wrong stuff. Very good stories of WWII bomber missions and life of those flying them. I don't know how he kept his "stuff" together. Highly recommended

  • The Zero Marginal Cost Society

  • The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism
  • By: Jeremy Rifkin
  • Narrated by: David Cochran Heath
  • Length: 14 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 354
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 308
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 307

In this provocative new book, Rifkin argues that the coming together of the Communication Internet with the fledgling Energy Internet and Logistics Internet in a seamless twenty-first-century intelligent infrastructure—the Internet of Things—is boosting productivity to the point where the marginal cost of producing many goods and services is nearly zero, making them essentially free.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not a convincing argument-just stories & ideology

  • By Pierre Parent on 07-26-17

Good insights but goes off into rabbit holes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

Interesting insights into the changes that are taking place because of communicatons and manufacturing breakthroughs. He forgets that social forces will delay and or derail many of the new initiatives, but I cannot be sure which. Of concern is his nearly total disregard for the problems of massive failure of the system due to errors and/or attack. He does give about a paragraph's lip service to this issue in the last chapter. A kind of, "by the way if this happens 80% of the population could die." Systems need to be more robust if we are to live in the future world. Unfortunately, they are not now and w are all at risk.

  • The Road

  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12,416
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,501
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,526

America is a barren landscape of smoldering ashes, devoid of life except for those people still struggling to scratch out some type of existence. Amidst this destruction, a father and his young son walk, always toward the coast, but with no real understanding that circumstances will improve once they arrive. Still, they persevere, and their relationship comes to represent goodness in a world of utter devastation.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Predictable. Slow.

  • By Michael on 03-03-17

Dark, inciteful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

Very dark post-apocalyptic novel. A study of character, child rearing, and hope. Follows the odyssey of a father and his son "the man" and "the boy". Desperate, moving. Living on the edge of hope.
I am not a big post-apocalyptic fan but this book was special.

0 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • We

  • By: Yevgeny Zamyatin
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 769
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 697
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 698

Set in the 26th century A.D., Yevgeny Zamyatin's masterpiece describes life under the regimented totalitarian society of OneState, ruled over by the all-powerful "Benefactor." Recognized as the inspiration for George Orwell's 1984, We is the archetype of the modern dystopia, or anti-Utopia: a great prose poem detailing the fate that might befall us all if we surrender our individual selves to some collective dream of technology and fail in the vigilance that is the price of freedom.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting history, prose a little outdated

  • By Joel D Offenberg on 11-30-11

One of the very best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-27-16

I am astounded by this book. Written 90 years ago it speaks directly to today. The translation is marvelous. The narrator is one of the finest on Audible.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Altered Carbon

  • By: Richard K. Morgan
  • Narrated by: Todd McLaren
  • Length: 17 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9,542
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,342
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,338

In the 25th century, humankind has spread throughout the galaxy, monitored by the watchful eye of the U.N. While divisions in race, religion, and class still exist, advances in technology have redefined life itself. Now, assuming one can afford the expensive procedure, a person's consciousness can be stored in a cortical stack at the base of the brain and easily downloaded into a new body (or "sleeve") making death nothing more than a minor blip on a screen.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Altered Carbon

  • By Jake Williams on 09-22-07

Excellent story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-16

Original,thoughtful. Reminiscent of noire classic detectives took one point off for recording quality. The reader was excellent.

  • A Place Called Freedom

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,290
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,717
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,696

This lush novel, set in 1766 England and America, evokes an era ripe with riot and revolution, from the teeming streets of London to the sprawling grounds of a Virginia plantation. Mack McAsh burns with the desire to escape his life of slavery in Scottish coal mines while Lizzie Hallim is desperate to shed a life of sheltered subjugation to her spineless husband. United in America, their only chance for freedom lies beyond the Western frontier - if they're brave enough to take it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • an abridged feeling ...

  • By Mohi on 04-16-15

Forced story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-17-16

The story was entirely you unbelievable. The sexual encounters always seemed to include descriptions of erections. I have read many Follett books but this one was more like a failed romance novel. I think I am done with this author. Simon Prebble was the only bright spot.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Labyrinth of Osiris

  • By: Paul Sussman
  • Narrated by: Gordon Griffin
  • Length: 24 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 72

Much has changed since Yusuf Khalifa of the Luxor Police and hard-nosed Jerusalem detective Arieh Ben-Roi last met. Ben-Roi is about to become a father, and Khalifa is struggling with personal tragedies. But as they each work on their own - seemingly isolated - cases, the two investigations begin to entwine. They soon find themselves drawn into a sinister web of violence, abuse, corporate malpractice and anti-capitalist terrorism. And at the heart of the web lies the Labyrinth...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story .

  • By Donna Burcham on 06-09-16

Suprise

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-15

I had never heard of tis book or Paul Sussman. The book was fast-paced, suprising, interesting, and entertaining. I know Israel and Israeli's fairly well and could recognize man of these characters. The narrator occasionally stumbles over Hebrew words, but this does not detract (especially since most will not know or care). I was somewhat put off at the climax, but enjoyed the entire novel so well, I rate it a 5