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Denise

saint helens, oregon, United States
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  • reviews
  • 65
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  • 101
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  • Sworn to the Night

  • The Wisdom's Grave Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Craig Schaefer
  • Narrated by: Susannah Jones
  • Length: 14 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

Marie Reinhart is an NYPD detective on the trail of a serial killer. When she sleeps, though, she dreams of other lives; she dreams of being a knight, in strange wars and strange worlds. On the other side of the city, Nessa Roth is a college professor trapped in a loveless marriage, an unwilling prop in a political dynasty. She's also a fledgling witch, weaving poppets and tiny spells behind closed doors. When Marie's case draws her into Nessa's path, sparks fly. What comes next is more than a furtive whirlwind affair; it's the first pebbles of an avalanche.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Schaefer needs to do more passion projects

  • By Sextus Scorpius Scorpenis on 03-24-18

Too much wandering, but a decent ending.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-18

This book had too much wandering around but had a good, if slightly confused ending.

I love all of the Daniel Faust books by Craig Schaefer, but despite the fact that he's in this it just doesn't make the grade. I found the book was written from too many unnecessary points of view. Not only was there the two main characters, but Faust, Melody Black, at least 2 'bad guys' pov and a handful of others including the police and the person telling the story. While I did like the two main characters of Nessa and Marie as well as the pairing, I found the '50 Shades of Grey' thing they had going on a bit weird.

I kept listening to this story simply because of my love of the Daniel Faust books, and his inclusion made this pretty awesome for me, but I don't think I'll be running to get the next installment. I'll probably pick it up eventually out of curiosity, but I spent too much time with this book wondering if I should put it down to give it more than general interest.

  • Scythe

  • By: Neal Shusterman
  • Narrated by: Greg Tremblay
  • Length: 10 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,471
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,119
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,118

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery: Humanity has conquered all those things and has even conquered death. Now Scythes are the only ones who can end life - and they are commanded to do so in order to keep the size of the population under control. Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe - a role that neither wants. These teens must master the "art" of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Immortal until you're Gleaned

  • By G. Grimsley on 06-27-17

Bad

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-17

I love books by Neal Shusterman so when I saw this I barely looked at the summary before buying it. I wish I had waited. The book is just bad. It flounders back and forth and the characters aren't very sympathetic. The students supposedly loved their mentor but I just wasn't feeling it. There was also supposed to be an underlying romance between the characters which I found hard to believe. I think essentially the book tried to cover too much in too short of a time and did a bad job of it.

10 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • The Eternal World

  • A Novel
  • By: Christopher Farnsworth
  • Narrated by: Tom Perkins
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 87
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 81

It is 500 years ago. A group of Spanish conquistadors searching for gold, led by a young and brilliant commander named Simon De Oliveras, land in the New World. What they find in this uncharted land is a treasure far more valuable: the Fountain of Youth. The Spaniards slaughter the Uzita, the Native American tribe who guard the precious waters that will keep the conquistadors young for centuries. But one escapes: Shako, the chief's fierce and beautiful daughter, who swears to avenge her people - a blood oath that spans more than five centuries.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not what I expected

  • By cristina on 09-10-15

I really liked it.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-17

This was an interesting premise for a book. It jumps back and forth in time so that's the one thing I'd caution about since if you aren't paying attention you might lose track for a second which time you're in. (I usually work while I listen)

The best part of the story was that the people you would normally have listed as bad - weren't exactly. Also the people who you expected on the "good" side weren't always good. Oh, there were a few that were bad all through but they weren't any of the main characters. It was written so you could see both sides of the story, both good and bad but no one really had any pure motivations. I like that in a book because it makes people seem real. Sure in a fantasy pure knightly motives are the ideal, but this was real world and was amazing.

I'd recommend anything by Christopher Farnsworth and am kicking myself for putting this one off for so long.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Desert Spear

  • By: Peter V. Brett
  • Narrated by: Pete Bradbury
  • Length: 26 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,828
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,035
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,034

The world remains under siege by demonkind stalking the land when the sun goes down. But a new hero has risen from the desert. Claiming to be the mythical Deliverer, Ahmann Jardir now rides alongside the allied desert tribes of Krasia. Jardir and his fellows are on an epic quest to vanquish the demons plaguing the world and bring humanity back from the brink of extinction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worth My Credit

  • By Lauffeuer on 05-27-10

Love it, hate it. Hate it, love it. (spoilers)

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-17

This book contains the story of Jardir, Arlen's nemesis from Krasia and that's part of why it got such low reviews from me. The summary does mention this but I had hoped that it would be interspersed with the current story and it wasn't. The whole first third was Jardir's story and I ended up skipping any chapter that didn't contain the stuff he was doing in Rizen. I'm guessing it was done to help the readers understand the character, but it was like reading the story of a abusive husband. You know he's abusive because his father was but it didn't leave me liking him any more.

Finally after about the 8 hour mark we got back to the original story and it was fantastic! Completely fantastic! I was grateful that I didn't put the book down like I had wanted to a dozen or more times getting to this point. The Warded Man is my favorite character in all these books and he has stayed mostly true to form. I thought he took on too much guilt in some things people said when he went back to revisit his home(s), but I think that's mostly because I personally thought he was so awesome. The only thing that really bothered me was that the narrator started reading him with a different voice at the end of the book.

Unfortunately the greatness didn't last... The Warded Man split off from the group to deliver news of the invasion and Lecia and the gang went back to Cutter's Hollow. Lecia's actions in her parts of the story were so implausible that I thought maybe she had been replaced by her evil twin. Jardir came to Cutter's Hollow looking for the Warded Man and instead of doing something leader-like (I can't think of what and apparently the author couldn't either) she went and fell into a romantic entanglement with him. I won't go into detail but I couldn't understand how she could be so naive or blind or stupid to do such a thing. Considering how she yelled at Arden when he said that war was their only option I can only assume that she took her mother's path and followed her loins to Rizen to visit with Jardir when he asked them to come despite all the evidence that he and his people abused, raped killed and worse when they conquered the city. I could go on, but trust me it only gets more unrealistic from there.

In summary: I loved it, I hated it. I wanted more, and I almost put it down almost a dozen times. Horrible I know. Even now after all this I can't decide whether or not to use a credit on the next book and then just skip chapters to the story lines I want to see continue. This book is the perfect example of why mult-character stories are so hard to do well. But for god's sake at least keep the characters true to form!

  • Trapped

  • The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 5
  • By: Kevin Hearne
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 9 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,744
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,008
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,015

After 12 years of secret training, Atticus O’Sullivan is finally ready to bind his apprentice, Granuaile, to the earth and double the number of Druids in the world. But on the eve of the ritual, the world that thought he was dead abruptly discovers that he’s still alive, and they would much rather he return to the grave. Having no other choice, Atticus, his trusted Irish wolfhound, Oberon, and Granuaile travel to the base of Mount Olympus, where the Roman god Bacchus is anxious to take his sworn revenge - but he’ll have to get in line behind an ancient vampire, a band of dark elves, and an old god of mischief.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not as good as some of the others in the series

  • By Melissa Schroff on 12-18-12

Kevin Hearne commits the fatal flaw of fiction

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

I loved books 1 - 4 and have even been lucky enough to find all of these far enough along to read them straight through without pausing for the next to come out. Sadly in this one Hearne commits what I consider one of the fatal flaws of writing fiction. In this book Granuaille finally becomes a druid after 12 years of study (note: I'd like to emphasize that it's been ONLY 12 years) It's really great to see her complete her training as I've always liked her character... until this. As a "newbie" to the druidic arts she shouldn't be so super powered as to be able to beat a god of war in a sparring match after only 12 years of training. She shouldn't be able take on a horde of wild women and survive to save Atticus from his single opponent. (again after only 12 years of training). Gaia grants her the best and most powerful of animal forms, and she receives a weapon that even goddesses have helped make, because she is just that special. She is a prodigy that understands some of the druidic arts better than Atticus who's been doing it for centuries. She is Granuaille and can leap tall buildings in a single bound! This is a huge flaw in the fiction simply because she should not be more powerful than her mentor, let alone the gods. She's a novice. There isn't anything left for her to overcome if she's already top of the food chain. What is the point of giving a character an animal form that can take anything on? It's much more interesting to give a weaker form and have the character work around it's flaws. Where's the story if there's nothing to overcome? The whole super power Granuaille makes the book boring because clearly Granuaille can beat anyone now and does. To some degree it also relegated (in my opinion) Atticus to a secondary character which is a damn shame since I love him in the books.

If I listen to the next one it will be on loan. The reviews are even harsher on Granuaille in further books and honestly it's not surprising since it seems that anything Atticus can do Grainuaille can do better. Mr. Hearne, if you or any of your people even bother to read these reviews just give her her own story. That way she won't keep ruining Atticus's.

Luke Daniels, as usual, makes this story a pleasure to listen to.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Way into Darkness

  • The Great Way, Book 3
  • By: Harry Connolly
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 415
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 389
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388

What was once the Peradaini Empire is now a wasted landscape of burned, empty cities and abandoned farmlands. The Blessing, now more numerous than ever, continues to spread across the continent, driving refugees to the dubious safety of the city walls. Unharvested crops mean that few strongholds have enough provisions to last the winter, although most know the grunts will take them before starvation will. But hope survives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Both interesting and exciting through the end

  • By Sailfish on 10-15-16

Warning - Spoilers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-16

I loved this series and would recommend it to anyone but I have to admit that I found the ending to be a bit of a flop. That's not to say that it ended badly exactly but it felt like the author was grasping at straws to find a way to wrap it up and the finale was sort of smashed in there as an afterthought. I can think of a few different ways I would have liked to see it go, but I enjoyed the story regardless. My only remaining nagging question (spoilers) - what happened to Lar Italga and all of Cazia's other compatriots? Did they all die? It seems to me that the battle could have been won and they could have found each other as well. The reason for the blessing seemed to be a bit of a reach as well simply because it felt like the author was pulling a barely used group into the story for no other reason than to fill a hole.

I know I make this sound like I didn't like it. My reviews tend to leave me pointing out what I see as flaws in the story, but I did enjoy it enough to llisten to the whole series in less than a week so I definitely recommend it. A+ story.

  • The Ghost Rebellion

  • Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences, Book 5
  • By: Pip Ballantine, Tee Morris
  • Narrated by: Tee Morris, Pip Ballantine
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 183
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 177
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 172

The chase is on! After rescuing Queen Victoria from the clutches of the Maestro, Agents Eliza D Braun and Wellington Books are in hot pursuit of Dr. Henry Jekyll. While he continues his experiments on the aristocracy of Europe, he leaves a trail of chaos and despair in his wake. However, when Eliza and Wellington run him to ground in India, they are forced to come face to face with ghosts from the past, and the realities of empire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Story fell short, and narration was annoying.

  • By -dan'l on 08-27-16

What happened to the narrator?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Probably not

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

The interludes were distracting and I would rather that it had focused on the main characters.

What didn’t you like about Tee Morris and Pip Ballantine ’s performance?

It was nothing like the previous books. I thought that Books sounded more American than British and Eliza wasn't much better. That steampunk feel was simply gone. Overall it was just really bad narrating like they were brand new at it (maybe they were) and were working hard to stay in character.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. The narrator(s) were so distracting because they didn't sound the way the characters should that I simply stopped listening because I wasn't paying attention to the story. I thought this was a shame because I've loved all the Ministry of Peculiar Instances books.

14 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • In the Still of the Knight

  • The Black Knight Chronicles, Book 5
  • By: John G. Hartness
  • Narrated by: Nick J. Russo
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 147
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146

Murders are happening outside Charlotte's hottest nightspots. A new vampire society has set up shop in the sewers. And Jimmy Black's about to run afoul of the Master of the City. If Jimmy weren't already a vampire, the week ahead would be the death of him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I can't say enough good things

  • By Denise on 10-25-15

I can't say enough good things

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-15

All the books in this series are worth great reviews, but in my opinion this one topped them all - not an easy thing for the last (but hopefully not final) book in a series. I can't say anything about it, simply because it was so fun and action packed that anything other than gushing enthusiasm will give away part of the plot. I personally liked it so much that when it was done I wanted to start it over again from the beginning.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Mountain of Daggers

  • Tales of the Black Raven, Book 1
  • By: Seth Skorkowsky
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 75
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 71

Whether he's breaking into an impregnable fortress, fighting pirates, or striking the final blow in political war, Ahren is the man for the job. After being framed for murder, his reward posters have named him The Black Raven. In order to survive, Ahren finds himself drafted into the Tyenee, a secret criminal organization whose influence stretches across the world. Their missions are the most daring and most dangerous, and the penalty for failure...is death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I really hope to see a followup soon!

  • By Steve H. Caldwell on 08-25-15

Not what I wanted

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-15

I adored the Damoren series. Skorkowsky has a way of dragging you into the story almost right off the bat, and I was waiting impatiently for this one. My issue? I was hoping for a story about Ahren the Black Raven and not just a bunch of random stories about his adventures. I will probably return this since although each story is good none of them really go anywhere or get in depth with the characters (understandably since there is not enough time in a 30 min story) and I don't like that. I hope Skorkowsky writes another book about the Black Raven because I'd like to read more about him than just his jobs as a thief. The potential is there and I am feeling very let down.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Lascar's Dagger

  • The Forsaken Lands
  • By: Glenda Larke
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 19 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 53

Saker appears to be a simple priest, but in truth he's a spy for the head of his faith. Wounded in the line of duty by a Lascar sailor's blade, the weapon seems to follow him home. Unable to discard it, nor the sense of responsibility it brings, Saker can only follow its lead. The dagger puts Saker on a journey to distant shores, on a path that will reveal terrible secrets about the empire, about the people he serves, and destroy the life he knows.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spy - Priest - Swordman

  • By Coral on 04-09-15

Lacking

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-25-15

I'm writing this review because I plan to return the book and I'm not able to review afterwards. I found this book difficult to listen to. It started very slowly and although after a bit it picked up I found other things I didn't like. Now have caution - I'll be putting in some spoilers here - you have been warned. My main issue was with Saker and princess Mathilde. I spent the whole start of the "relationship" thinking what an idiot he was and then after he was arrested calling him even more of an idiot for being so naive. I have no idea how he can be a spy and be so blind to another person's nature. Really he didn't seem to be a very good spy in a multitude of ways. I also found Mathilde's actions very manipulative and childish because although I sympathized with her predicament she wasn't able to see past the fact that the same thing happened to other women all the time and she was willing to bring anyone down with her to avoid it. The story had potential, truly it did and from the reviews it's clear that many liked it very much, but it wasn't for me. I simply can't bear idiocy from a character and the story had too much of it.