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Steve

Massachusetts, USA
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 133
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  • Bushido Online: The Battle Begins

  • By: Nikita Thorn
  • Narrated by: Christian Rummel
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,162
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,163

Seth Kinnaman's dream has always been to become the best fighter the world has ever seen. After spending his entire life training, he's finally ready to test his skills in the biggest tournament on Earth, where hundreds of the fiercest competitors vie for the supreme title. In the semifinals, Seth is getting the upper hand when his opponent uses an illegal blow to take him out. Upon waking up from a coma, Seth finds out he's lost his sight. He's become blind, and he's completely devastated. All his dreams are now shattered, and he soon falls into depression.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Gamer's Fun Ride!

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 06-18-18

Author transcribed someones modern MMO LetsPlay?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

I don't understand the high reviews for this book. If you're looking for a detailed world with living AI npc's and a vast world, you wont find it here. NPCs and quests are static and repeatable for every character like just about every standard modern MMO.

Let's start with the premise. The MC is an MMA fighter goes blind right in the beginning. When he gets in game he becomes a sword fighter and not some kind of monk or martial artist? Whatever, fine. The MC says he learns fast and does research on the world, but when he enters the game he is inundated by beta players who already know every quest, class, race, item, and feature of the entire game while he is a bog standard newb. He never figures anything out on his own. The whole book consists of him following a quest, then getting led by the nose by beta players who tell him exactly how to do a quest and what to be prepared for. The beta players even recite NPC lines because they've done the quests so many times. The MC is a two dimensional idiot. There was an hour left in the book and the MC STILL hadn't even learned how to use the in-game mail system.

I don't know who this book was for. Do yourself a favor and skip it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Land: Raiders: A LitRPG Saga

  • Chaos Seeds, Book 6
  • By: Aleron Kong
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12,710
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,999
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 11,963

The time of hiding has passed. The Mist Village will make itself known. Goblins have invaded Richter’s lands. Though the first incursion has been defeated, the anger of Chaos Seed remains. Those who challenge Richter’s power will learn there is a reason all creatures fear the mist.... It is the home of monsters. For the first time, Richter takes the battle to his enemies. He will live up to his name, and the very Land will shake with this power.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing adventure!

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-17-19

Another good sequel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-18

Not much to say. More of the same village building and questing. A large portion of the book focuses on a fairly large battle, but it's good. Now if Aleron could get his head out of his butt the GameLit/LitRPG community could go back to bring a unified whole... but I doubt that will happen.

  • The Land: Swarm

  • Chaos Seeds, Book 5
  • By: Aleron Kong
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12,156
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 11,506
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,464

Aleron Kong's number-one best-selling LitRPG saga continues in The Land: Swarm. The enemies of the Mist Village are moving, the storm clouds are gathering, what are Richter and Sion to do? Crush the game, that's what! More of everything you love in LitRPG: powerful items, epic battles, awesome quests, and in-depth world building! What happened to Elora? Where is the swarm? Did the rock giant make Richter jelly? What are the colonel's secret spices?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great addition to the series

  • By Kaz on 01-16-19

Good Story, dislike author.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-18

These are some pretty good books. I like that the MC stats and skills aren't totally OP like in some GameLit books. I live the village building aspect. The story is pretty good, but this one had a good deal of horny teenage fantasy, but you get past it. I don't agree with the BS Aleron is pulling with the LitRPG genre and dislike him personally for his false claims and dissent he and his fans have caused in the community, but he does write a decent novel.

  • The Hike

  • By: Drew Magary
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,977
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,741
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,730

When Ben, a suburban family man, takes a business trip to rural Pennsylvania, he decides to spend the afternoon before his dinner meeting on a short hike. Once he sets out into the woods behind his hotel, he quickly comes to realize that the path he has chosen cannot be given up easily. With no choice but to move forward, Ben finds himself falling deeper and deeper into a world of man-eating giants, bizarre demons, and colossal insects.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best ending I can remember

  • By David on 05-08-17

3.5 For a specific audience

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-17

The summary tells you pretty much all you need to know. tl;dr Treat it as an adventure/walking sim LitRPG.

I liked all of the book except for the ending.

When I came to tell my opinions I noticed the off-putting reviews. I can somewhat see why. Much of the story is quite random and doesn't seem to have a point. There is a spot a little more than half way through where things progress quite a bit, and then back to the same. The ending is VERY rushed.

Looking at this from a standard fantasy story perspective, it's not great. However, I chose to think of it sort of as an adventure LitRPG with the Producer as the DM and no leveling. seeing it this way made the journey more enjoyable and acceptable to me..... except for the ending. Looking at it from a LitRPG view, this book could have had multiple sequels. As it stands, it felt like the author just wanted to wrap it up and be done with it. There was one small redeeming feature at the very end, but it really wasn't enough to make up for it. Take it how you will.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Patch 17

  • By: G. Akella
  • Narrated by: Zach Villa
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 868
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 817
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 817

A new update arrives to the ultra-popular online game, Realm of Arkon. With Patch 17, the level of immersion experienced by players in their gaming capsules has made virtual reality indistinguishable from the real world. But every gamer's dream becomes a nightmare for Roman Kozhevnikov after he gets confined to Arkon against his will. And not just to Arkon, but to its deadliest zone - Demon Grounds. Playing - or rather living - as his character Krian, it's not just about survival for Roman.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Usual LitRPG book, but interesting

  • By Steve on 02-15-17

Usual LitRPG book, but interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-17

Patch 17 does not stand out in the LitRPG genre. The genre is fairly new and many books are falling into the trope where the MMO locks the players in permanently and either kills them or puts the person's body into a coma. This is one such tale. It is an easy driving force for the story. Without it the story would need a compelling reason for the characters to stay in the game. Patch 17 also goes for the trope where most of the special and unique things happen to the MC.

It's not a bad book, and it is interesting, but the story really goes nowhere. The MC does have an end goal, but it's rather flimsy and vague, he'll get there eventually. But before that he has to level up. So off questing he goes.

There are a few other negatives to the book. Firstly, as you'll hear it throughout the book, the character and item stats readouts are awful and awkward. In the kindle version it's neatly laid out with a nice readable format, audible, not so much. Secondly, there are some character transitions where the jump cut is very quick and brief with hardly a pause. It can be a little confusing. Third, there are a couple NPC backstories that the MC has a vision of. They tend to be absurdly long and have little to no impact on the story going forward. Lastly, the book just ends without any kind of resolution to anything.

Despite all of this I will be getting the next book. I'm a sucker for the LitRPG genre especially when all the special events happen to the MC.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Angles of Attack

  • Frontlines, Book 3
  • By: Marko Kloos
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,804
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,788

The alien forces known as the Lankies are gathering on the solar system's edge, consolidating their conquest of Mars and setting their sights on Earth. The far-off colony of New Svalbard, cut off from the rest of the galaxy by the Lanky blockade, teeters on the verge of starvation and collapse. The forces of the two Earth alliances have won minor skirmishes but are in danger of losing the war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story! Preformance was well done!

  • By Mike Morrow on 04-22-15

Much better

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

I enjoyed Angles of Attack much more than Lines of Departure. A lot more happened in this book than the previous one. Interesting developments and some unexpected twists.

As for Luke, we get to experience a wider vocal range from him this time. The introduction of different cultural characters brought out more voices. Hope this continues.

Improvements all around.

  • Lines of Departure

  • Frontlines, Book 2
  • By: Marko Kloos
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,085
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,627
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,610

Vicious interstellar conflict with an indestructible alien species. Bloody civil war over the last habitable zones of the cosmos. Political unrest, militaristic police forces, dire threats to the solar system. Humanity is on the ropes, and after years of fighting a two-front war with losing odds, so is Commonwealth Defense Corps officer Andrew Grayson.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better than the first book

  • By David on 03-14-15

Not as good as the first, but in for the long haul

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

Lines of Departure was somewhat disappointing. Terms of Enlistment was interesting enough of a start, but this book was pretty much: they go to this place, stay there and that's about it. There was really only one real significant plot point, the res was kind of meh.

As for Luke Daniels, I usually like him, but in this book he got pretty repetitive with his character voices. This was not a book where he bothered to stretch his vocal range.

Fret not.
I have already listened to book 3. It was definitely more enjoyable than this one.

  • Terms of Enlistment

  • Frontlines, Book 1
  • By: Marko Kloos
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 9 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,989
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,345

The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you’re restricted to 2,000 calories of badly flavored soy every day. You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service. With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • passable, standard scifi tropes... blah

  • By Jayho74 on 09-01-16

Nothing new, but enjoyable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-17

First and foremost I want to get something out of the way. One of the top has a very low score due to the narrator "yelling". I nearly didn't buy the title due to the review, I'm glad I took the chance. The only way this could be a problem is if you have noise cancelling earbuds in and listening at maximum volume. Then yes, that might be unpleasant. Otherwise you'll be fine. I rather enjoyed Luke Daniels in the Magic 2.0 series and also enjoy him here in Frontlines. A few of the characters do sound a little samey, but it's inevitable when there are a lot of them.

As for the book itself, it honestly felt like it drew a lot from Star Ship Troopers. Not exactly, but similar, which is fine with me as I like the book and the movie (only the first one). Terms of Enlistment is fairly enjoyable and for $3 (buying the kindle book first), it's a steal. I'll gladly buy the rest and continue with the story.

  • Nightwise

  • By: R. S. Belcher
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,830
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,610
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,610

In the more shadowy corners of the world, frequented by angels and demons and everything in between, Laytham Ballard is a legend. It's said he raised the dead at the age of 10, stole the Philosopher's Stone in Vegas back in 1999, and survived the bloodsucking kiss of the Mosquito Queen. Wise in the hidden ways of the night, he's also a cynical bastard who stopped thinking of himself as the good guy a long time ago.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed Story And Narration

  • By Beth on 08-28-15

Anti-Hero urban wizard.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-16

Glad I ignored many of the reviews. Yes, in the beginning of the book there is an absurd amount of graphic violence and drug use, but only in the beginning. It is used to show us exactly what sort of person Laytham is and his way of life. After the character and story setup, the violence and drug use lessens to a moderate amount, it is after all a story about a criminal type wizard.

One decent gripe I have about this book is the narrator. Don't get me wrong, I loved Mr. Pinchot's narration of The Grimnoir Chronicles. He is perfect in that series.... less so in this book. He reads very quickly and makes it sound like each paragraph is one long run-on sentence where he only pauses at the end. Also, some of the characters start sounding the same after a while. It is definitely listenable, just a little disappointing after hearing his better works.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Critical Failures

  • Caverns and Creatures, Book 1
  • By: Robert Bevan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Sleep
  • Length: 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8,627
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,160
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,147

Tim and his friends find out the hard way that you shouldn't question the game master, and you shouldn't make fun of his cape. One minute, they're drinking away the dreariness of their lives, escaping into a fantasy game and laughing their asses off. The next minute, they're in a horse-drawn cart surrounded by soldiers pointing crossbows at them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Audible Studio...More Please!

  • By M. Maryanow on 02-01-15

Vulgar D&D with friends

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-16

This LitRPG reads like a group of vulgar friends playing a D&D clone in real life within the game world. The group upsets the DM who ends up magically transporting them into the game world as their characters trying to stay alive and escape.

There are some frustrating parts here and there, but the interplay between all the characters is hilarious. Such a great series. I do kind of wish there was some sort of appendix with more details on the game mechanics, races, and classes. The books give just enough information on them so you know what's going on, but as a fan of these game systems, I wish it were fleshed somewhat more.

Last warning. I've mentioned it a couple times and I can't say it enough. The language in this series is VERY vulgar and crude. Many many swears, dick jokes, and dark humor. If you enjoy crude humor and tabletop RPGs, you'll love this series. If you're not okay with an absurd amount of it, please don't even bother.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful