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Chris

  • 17
  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 148
  • ratings
  • Stubborn Attachments

  • A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals
  • By: Tyler Cowen
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Arthur
  • Length: 3 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 55

In this new audiobook, Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals, Cowen argues that our reason and common sense can help free us of the faulty ideas that hold us back as people and as a society. Stubborn Attachments, at its heart, makes the contemporary moral case for economic growth and delivers a great dose of inspiration and optimism about our future possibilities. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Causal vs casual

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-24-18

Causal is not “casual”

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-18-18

It was very annoying to hear the narrator say “casual “ for “causal”.

I’d be happy to hear Cowen talk about growth in context of a single global society, such as that which Yuval Noah Harari sees us moving to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Fata Morgana

  • By: Steven R. Boyett, Ken Mitchroney
  • Narrated by: Macleod Andrews
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,029
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,017

At the height of the air war in Europe, Captain Joe Farley and the baseball-loving, wisecracking crew of the B-17 Flying Fortress Fata Morgana are in the middle of a harrowing bombing mission over East Germany when everything goes sideways. The bombs are still falling, and flak is still exploding all around the 20-ton bomber as it is knocked like a bathtub duck into another world. Suddenly stranded with the final outcasts of a desolated world, Captain Farley navigates a maze of treachery and wonder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book had it all

  • By Magnus on 10-14-17

not bad, just predictable and simplistic.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-18

The book isn't bad, just not interesting. I found it predictable and simplistic and not good enough for me to finish it.

The authors do a good job with the B-17, and also with the WW-II era language.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • When Einstein Walked with Gödel

  • Excursions to the Edge of Thought
  • By: Jim Holt
  • Narrated by: David Stifel
  • Length: 15 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 214
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200

Does time exist? What is infinity? Why do mirrors reverse left and right but not up and down? In this scintillating collection, Holt explores the human mind, the cosmos, and the thinkers who’ve tried to encompass the latter with the former. With his trademark clarity and humor, Holt probes the mysteries of quantum mechanics, the quest for the foundations of mathematics, and the nature of logic and truth. Along the way, he offers intimate biographical sketches of celebrated and neglected thinkers, from the physicist Emmy Noether to the computing pioneer Alan Turing and the discoverer of fractals, Benoit Mandelbrot.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good overview of scientific theory

  • By Tracy Rowan on 09-11-18

Impressive scope w stimulating ideas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-17-18

Despite the impressive scope (math, philosophy, the fate of the universe), the book is very enjoyable and moves quickly. I don't buy all the philosophy, yet it's interesting to hear such a broad, rapidly moving take. I'll enjoy a second listen.

  • Wild Women of Prescott, Arizona

  • Wicked
  • By: Jan Mackell Collins
  • Narrated by: Patty Nieman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Arizona remained a raw, rather uncivilized territory before it became one of the last states to enter the Union. Few towns exemplify this more than Prescott. Within six years of establishment, at least five prostitutes operated in Prescott. As their clientele grew, so did their influence. Mollie Sheppard, Lida Winchell, Gabriell Dollie, and many more women were integral forces on the city that should not be forgotten. Join author Jan MacKell Collins to discover the soiled doves of Prescott's red-light district.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining, educational

  • By Chris on 04-18-18

Entertaining, educational

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-18

Any additional comments?

I liked the book; it was educational and provides context for the early West.

I wish the author had not been so prolific with her synonyms for prostitute; it was distracting to have a different synonym in every sentence. I think it would have been respectful to the subjects if they had been referred to as "women" much more often, rather than always inserting "soiled doves" or the sanctimonious "fallen women".

  • Rocket Billionaires

  • Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the New Space Race
  • By: Tim Fernholz
  • Narrated by: Erin Moon
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 90
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91

For the larger-than-life personalities now staking their fortunes on the development of rocket ships, the new race to explore space could be a dead end, a lucrative opportunity - or the key to humanity's salvation. Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos take center stage in this fast-paced narrative as they attempt to disrupt the space economy, feed their own egos, and maybe even save the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting book; hard to listen to

  • By K. Thai on 04-12-18

Great overall, nice narative, poor performance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-18

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Erin Moon?

The narrator consistently pronounced "NASA" like "Nassau". Also once talked about a rocket breaking up when it reached the "sound of speed".

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Man Who Knew Everything

  • The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age
  • By: David N. Schwartz
  • Narrated by: Tristan Morris
  • Length: 15 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 142

In 1942, a team at the University of Chicago achieved what no one had before: a nuclear chain reaction. At the forefront of this breakthrough stood Enrico Fermi. Straddling the ages of classical physics and quantum mechanics, equally at ease with theory and experiment, Fermi truly was the last man who knew everything - at least about physics. But he was also a complex figure who was a part of both the Italian Fascist Party and the Manhattan Project, and a less-than-ideal father and husband who nevertheless remained one of history's greatest mentors.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good Book About An Important Scientist

  • By John on 01-17-18

Great book, bad editing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

What made the experience of listening to The Last Man Who Knew Everything the most enjoyable?

I enjoyed the book very much. The details about the Fermis, the speculation of the author is useful and guarded, and the narrator was nice. There was some bad editing or something which made the audio in the last part of the book jump repeat.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Keynes Hayek

  • The Clash That Defined Modern Economics
  • By: Nicholas Wapshott
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 220
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223

As the stock market crash of 1929 plunged the world into turmoil, two men emerged with competing claims on how to restore the balance to economies gone awry. John Maynard Keynes, the mercurial Cambridge economist, believed that government had a duty to spend when others would not. He met his opposite in a little-known Austrian economics professor, Friedrich Hayek, who considered attempts to intervene both pointless and potentially dangerous.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An unbiased evaluation of both the major economist

  • By Anand on 03-17-12

Finishes strong

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-18

The details of the debate and non-debate between Keynes and Hayek is not always enjoyable or informative. The final few chapters are, on the other hand, enjoyable and informative.

  • White Trash

  • The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America
  • By: Nancy Isenberg
  • Narrated by: Kirsten Potter
  • Length: 15 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,941
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,643
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,614

In White Trash, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America's supposedly class-free society. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early 19th century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. Reconstruction pitted poor white trash against newly freed slaves, which factored in the rise of eugenics. These poor were at the heart of New Deal reforms and LBJ's Great Society; they haunt us in reality TV shows like Here Comes Honey Boo Boo and Duck Dynasty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 400 Year Head Start Squandered

  • By Virgil on 10-11-16

Good content, many shrt stories, not much cohesion

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If my friend wanted to see how class influenced life in each of many periods in exhaustive detail, this is the book. If you want a summary, or to have some main points without so many anecdotes, go elsewhere.

What could Nancy Isenberg have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Tie it together somehow. So yes, there is and has been class, with the lowest whites being called 'white trash'. If there's somehow a narative or story to be told, that would have helped. If there were policy recommendations, they didn't last the few days since I finished the book.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • What Is Life?

  • How Chemistry Becomes Biology
  • By: Addy Pross
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 518
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 457
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 455

Seventy years ago, Erwin Schrdinger posed a simple, yet profound, question: What is life?. How could the very existence of such extraordinary chemical systems be understood? This problem has puzzled biologists and physical scientists both before, and ever since. Living things are hugely complex and have unique properties, such as self-maintenance and apparently purposeful behaviour which we do not see in inert matter. So how does chemistry give rise to biology?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Profound & Life Changing...

  • By Daegan Smith on 04-06-15

Loved it. Accessible yet thorough

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-24-16

A very accessible review of how life interacts w physics. The two types of stability helped me understand. Great stuff!

  • Makers and Takers

  • The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business
  • By: Rana Foroohar
  • Narrated by: Rachel Fulginiti
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 370
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 330
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 325

Eight years on from the biggest market meltdown since the Great Depression, the key lessons of the crisis of 2008 still remain unlearned - and our financial system is just as vulnerable as ever. Many of us know that our government failed to fix the banking system after the subprime mortgage crisis. But what few of us realize is how the misguided financial practices and philosophies that nearly toppled the global financial system have come to infiltrate all American businesses, putting us on a collision course with another cataclysmic meltdown.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Jared on 06-14-16

snarky critique of Apple, self-promotion distract

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-16

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Makers and Takers?

I suggest that all the self-referential comments by the author, and all comments about Apple be removed. Criticizing Apple for acting according to current laws and in its own self-interest is not helpful. I suggest that the focus be on policy suggestions and a storyline, rather than snark.