LISTENER

M. Laird

Austin, TX
  • 1
  • review
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 1
  • rating
  • Christmas Eve, 1914

  • By: Charles Olivier
  • Narrated by: Cameron Daddo, Xander Berkeley, Cody Fern, and others
  • Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,181
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,110
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,064

In 1914, the war which was to have been wrapped up by Christmas had - in reality - only just begun, as all sides entrenched themselves deeper into the Great War. Christmas Eve, 1914 follows one company of British officers as they rotate forward to spend their Christmas on the front lines, a mere 80 yards from the German guns. Upper- and working-class men and boys are thrown together into one trench and struggle to survive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully "illustrated"

  • By anonymous on 12-25-14

Moving story and performance: hope in midst of war

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-14

What did you love best about Christmas Eve, 1914?

The story, language, dialect, performances and sound really evoked the confusion, fear, comradery, despair, strength, and bravery of the men and the time in the midst of the horror of the war. And then the hope and the humanity. The sharing of pain across lines, the release of joy and laughter -- such an amazing moment during the Christmas of 1914.

Which scene was your favorite?

So difficult to say. The tension of the machine gun being prepared combined with the uncertainty of what the Germans were doing as they came with lanterns? The burying of Beecher? The reading of his letter? So many choices.

If you could take any character from Christmas Eve, 1914 out to dinner, who would it be and why?

Zac. He remained grounded, thoughtful and strong in the midst of a dehumanizing time.

Any additional comments?

The performance of the character Swinburn was amazing -- such a complicated personality. And I really enjoyed the character Zac and that performance as well. Charles Olivier captured elements of the war of which I'd been unaware, and I really enjoyed the language. Well done!

11 of 13 people found this review helpful