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Jeremy R. Morton, MD

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 10
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  • The Year of Living Danishly

  • Uncovering the Secrets of the World's Happiest Country
  • By: Helen Russell
  • Narrated by: Lucy Price-Lewis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,951
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,745
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,739

When she was suddenly given the opportunity of a new life in rural Jutland, journalist and archetypal Londoner Helen Russell discovered a startling statistic: the happiest place on earth isn't Disneyland but Denmark, a land often thought of by foreigners as consisting entirely of long, dark winters, cured herring, Lego and pastries. What is the secret to their success? Are happy Danes born or made?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting content. Unfortunate delivery.

  • By Jennifer Soudagar on 11-13-15

Very enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-16

Delightful story, very entertaining style and wonderfully narrated. I definitely recommend this book which lends itself particularly to the audio format.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Spillover

  • By: David Quammen
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 20 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 668
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 601
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 605

The emergence of strange new diseases is a frightening problem that seems to be getting worse. In this age of speedy travel, it threatens a worldwide pandemic. We hear news reports of Ebola, SARS, AIDS, and something called Hendra killing horses and people in Australia - but those reports miss the big truth that such phenomena are part of a single pattern. The bugs that transmit these diseases share one thing: they originate in wild animals and pass to humans by a process called spillover. David Quammen tracks this subject around the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good story with a few slow moments

  • By K on 05-11-14

Exhaustive, detailed presentation.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-16

This is a very detailed and exhaustive description of practically every known pathogen that has made use of multiple hosts and how genetic mutations, animal behavior, human behavior and chance have created myriads of des ease patterns from clusters to epidemics throughout history involving both animals and humans. The author also chronicles the numerous doctors and other scientists who have devoted their lives chasing these viruses and other organisms around the world. It may be a lot more than you ever wanted to know about zoonotic diseases, but for a physician it is a fascinating treatise, and I highly recommend it. I listened to it at double speed and found it moved along better. JRM, MD

1 of 1 people found this review helpful