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Sally Harrison-Pepper

  • 14
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 647
  • ratings
  • The Game

  • Inside the Secret World of Major League Baseball's Power Brokers
  • By: Jon Pessah
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Arthur
  • Length: 20 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 102

In the fall of 1992, America's national pastime is in crisis and already on the path to the unthinkable: cancelling a World Series for the first time in history. The owners are at war with each other, their decades-long battle with the players has turned America against both sides, and the players' growing addiction to steroids will threaten the game's very foundation.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Bad Narration

  • By Sally Harrison-Pepper on 08-15-15

Bad Narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-15

Until I went back and checked, I assumed this book was being badly read by the author. Now I see it was badly read by someone else! It's a great book, but stick to a print copy. I gave up listening after several painful hours when the narrator said "calary sap" instead of "salary cap." Incredible.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Go Set a Watchman

  • A Novel
  • By: Harper Lee
  • Narrated by: Reese Witherspoon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13,995
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,833
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12,798

An historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To Kill A Mockingbird vs Go Set A Watchman

  • By Sara on 07-15-15

Should've Stayed in the Desk Drawer

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-15

After all the hoopla about this book, and after listening to To Kill a Mockingbird right before buying this, I had high hopes of finding some new insights into TKaM and author Harper Lee. I now conclude, however, that Lee's sister Alice was correct in withholding and refusing to let anyone publish this thing. A HIUGE disappointment that also makes me angry that all the hype was clearly designed to simply cash in on Mockingbird's success without a thought about Lee or her readers. It is worth noting, too, that Lee's publisher was only able to grab this clearly unrevised & unedited hunk of paper and publish it after Alice died.

3 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Dark City

  • Repairman Jack: The Early Years, Book 2
  • By: F. Paul Wilson
  • Narrated by: Alexander Cendese
  • Length: 10 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 296

It's February 1991. Desert Storm is raging in Iraq but 22-year-old Jack has more pressing matters at home. His favorite bar, The Spot, is about to be sold out from under his friend Julio. No longer merely reactive, Jack takes the fight to his enemies and demonstrates his innate talent for seeing biters get bit. With a body count even higher than in Cold City, Dark City hurtles Jack toward the climax of this formative New York odyssey in which all scores will be settled, all debts paid.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Slooooow

  • By vanessa on 10-16-13

Big Disappointment

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-15

Nearly half the book was spent summarizing the previous book, the rest circled around much of the time, and then it abruptly ended.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Marx: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: Peter Singer
  • Narrated by: Kyle Munley
  • Length: 3 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91

In Marx: A Very Short Introduction, Peter Singer identifies the central vision that unifies Marx's thought, enabling us to grasp Marx's views as a whole. He sees him as a philosopher primarily concerned with human freedom, rather than as an economist or a social scientist. In plain English, he explains alienation, historical materialism, the economic theory of Capital, and Marx's ideas of communism, and concludes with an assessment of Marx's legacy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Cogent introduction

  • By Luke P. on 06-03-18

Dated & Droning

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-14

Information is presented by a droning narrator. Conclusions are no longer persuasive -- much has changed since this book was written.

2 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • American Jews and America's Game

  • Voices of a Growing Legacy in Baseball
  • By: Larry Ruttman
  • Narrated by: Richard Davidson
  • Length: 24 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars 1

Most fans don't know how far the Jewish presence in baseball extends beyond a few famous players such as Greenberg, Rosen, Koufax, Holtzman, Green, Ausmus, Youkilis, Braun, and Kinsler. In fact, that presence extends to the baseball commissioner Bud Selig, labor leaders Marvin Miller and Don Fehr, owners Jerry Reinsdorf and Stuart Sternberg, officials Theo Epstein and Mark Shapiro, sportswriters Murray Chass, Ross Newhan, Ira Berkow, and Roger Kahn, and even famous Jewish baseball fans like Alan Dershowitz and Barney Frank.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • I Really Wanted to Like This Book

  • By Sally Harrison-Pepper on 11-09-13

I Really Wanted to Like This Book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-13

I teach a course on "Baseball & American Culture" and was really excited about this book. The subject needs more attention than it's had in the past and this seemed so promising. Unfortunately, the book is poorly structured, wandering all over the place, and is read by a plodding narrator who sounds like he's in his 70's (no slur on age -- I'm in my 60's -- but on his pacing (repetitive) and vocal timbre). I had to give up after three hours. Giving the disorganized structure, the written version will likely not be any better. Very disappointing.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Local Habitation

  • An October Daye Novel
  • By: Seanan McGuire
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,026
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,026

October “Toby” Daye is a changeling, the daughter of Amandine of the fae and a mortal man. Like her mother, she is gifted in blood magic, able to read what has happened to a person through a mere taste of blood. Half-human, half-fae, outsiders from birth, most changelings are second-class children of Faerie spending their lives fighting for the respect of their immortal relations. Toby is the only changeling who has earned knighthood, and she re-earns that position every day.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a fantastic book!

  • By Marci on 04-10-10

Not As Good as the First

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-13

As my title says, this one was not even close to being as good as the first in this series. The first was well written. This one seemed formulaic. I won't be listening to more, I suspect.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Smart Ball

  • Marketing the Myth and Managing the Reality of Major League Baseball
  • By: Robert F. Lewis
  • Narrated by: Scotty Drake
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

Smart Ball follows Major League Baseball's history as a sport, a domestic monopoly, a neocolonial power, and an international business. MLB's challenge has been to market its popular mythology as the national pastime with pastoral, populist roots while addressing the management challenges of competing with other sports and diversions in a burgeoning global economy. Baseball researcher Robert F. Lewis II argues that MLB for years abused its legal insulation and monopoly status.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Smart Book with an Unfortunate Narrator

  • By Sally Harrison-Pepper on 02-23-13

Smart Book with an Unfortunate Narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-13

Lewis presents a provocative, scholarly argument that takes considerable focus to listen to and fully grasp (I've purchased the book to re-read his argument). And while I very much appreciated his perspectives, the narrator was extremely annoying in his frequently mispronounced words. Dominant among these words, and one that author Lewis uses throughout his book: "Pastoral." Pronounced "pas-TOR-al" by the narrator, every time he said it, I had to keep saying out loud: PAS-tor-al. grrrrr.... I went to online dictionaries to listen to audible pronunciations of this word, just to confirm that some new way of saying it hadn't entered the English language. It hasn't. So, the narrator (and whoever let him continue saying not only this word -- an especially important one when talking about the myth of baseball -- but the names of players as well) made this an even more difficult read. But I pushed on because I found the argument fascinating and, well, SMART.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Gate at the Stairs

  • By: Lorrie Moore
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 282
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 102

In her dazzling new novel--her first in more than a decade--Moore turns her eye on the anxiety and disconnection of post-9/11 America, on the insidiousness of racism, the blind-sidedness of war, and the recklessness thrust on others in the name of love.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Writing - Not Great Book

  • By Wendy on 11-02-09

Staccato Plot

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-13

This book had a weird, staccato feeling, in which plot elements jumped around and sometimes seemed to omit important information. It kept me from really engaging with the book in ways I might have with a smoother ride. In addition, the narrator was perhaps instructed to read with the vocal affect originally from Valley Girls but now much more widespread that is known as "vocal fry" at the end of sentences -- that growly, I'm-so-bored kind of tone -- and it annoyed the heck out of me. I tried to overlook it or credit it as an intentional, performative device, but it was difficult to do so.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Beautiful Ruins

  • By: Jess Walter
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
  • Length: 12 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10,876
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,591
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,585

The story begins in 1962. On a rocky patch of the sun-drenched Italian coastline, a young innkeeper, chest-deep in daydreams, looks out over the incandescent waters of the Ligurian Sea and spies an apparition: a tall, thin woman, a vision in white, approaching him on a boat. She is an actress, he soon learns, an American starlet, and she is dying. And the story begins again today, half a world away, when an elderly Italian man shows up on a movie studio's back lot - searching for the mysterious woman he last saw at his hotel decades earlier.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • My mind wandered

  • By Ella on 11-25-12

Beautiful!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-26-12

This is a beautifully written book. The language and structure are so great that I'm going to buy a hard copy so that I can reread and admire the author's beautiful choices. The reader does a good job -- not as beautiful as the writing, but good enough to convey a great story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Fistful of Collars

  • A Chet and Bernie Mystery, Book 5
  • By: Spencer Quinn
  • Narrated by: Jim Frangione
  • Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 798
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 703
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 702

Hoping to bring some Tinseltown money to the Valley, the mayor lures a movie studio to town to shoot their next production, a big-budget Western in the classic tradition. The star is none other than ruggedly handsome—and notoriously badly behaved—Thad Perry. When the mayor decides that someone needs to keep an eye on Thad so that he doesn’t get into too much trouble, Bernie and Chet are handpicked for the job. The money is good but something smells fishy....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Chet tells it like it is

  • By Linda on 01-10-13

Going Downhill

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-12

Would you try another book from Spencer Quinn and/or Jim Frangione?

Probably not

What could Spencer Quinn have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I wish Quinn had found more ways to use the concept of a story told from the dog's perspective. It was such a great idea in his first book, Dog On It, and had lots of hilarious consequences. I loved the way in which Chet, the dog, would get distracted when his owner/partner Bernie was in the middle of explaining the crime they were trying to solve and we'd miss #3 in a list of three. Often, Chet would be listening and then spot a piece on food on the food "Ooh, a Cheetoh! My favorite" and gobble it up, never returning to Bernie's observations. He was a most unreliable narrator, but wonderfully so.

Unfortunately, no book has been as good as that first one. Instead, it seems like each book is less likable than the ones preceding it.

What aspect of Jim Frangione’s performance would you have changed?

He should've been more excitable and frisky, in other words, "dog-like." I just don't see Chet being so solemn and deliberate.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful