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Yvette Keller

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  • Between Two Thorns

  • The Split Worlds Series, Book 1
  • By: Emma Newman
  • Narrated by: Emma Newman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 80

The new season is starting and the Master of Ceremonies is missing. Max, an Arbiter of the Split Worlds Treaty, is assigned with the task of finding him - with no one to help but a dislocated soul and a mad sorcerer. There is a witness, but his memories have been bound by magical chains only the enemy can break. A rebellious woman trying to escape her family may prove to be the ally Max needs. But can she be trusted? And why does she want to give up eternal youth and the life of privilege she’s been born into?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fascinating look at Fae and humans

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 11-29-16

Slow start, rewarding finish

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-18

This is a beautifully written book, read by its author. I admit to being unmotivated to listen continuously until a few hours into it, so it took me quite some time to finish. The pace really picked up and became utterly compelling about 1/3 of the way in. The last 2/3 of the book was a wonderful binge.

I enjoyed the world, the characters, and their unique conflicts.

  • Believe Me

  • A Memoir of Love, Death and Jazz Chickens
  • By: Eddie Izzard
  • Narrated by: Eddie Izzard
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,888
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,783
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,771

Over the course of a 30-year career, Eddie Izzard has proven himself to be a creative chameleon, inhabiting the stage and film and television screens with an unbelievable fervor. Born in Yemen and raised in Ireland, Wales, and postwar England, he lost his mother at the age of six. In his teens he dropped out of university and took to the streets of London as part of a two-man escape act; when his partner went on vacation, Izzard kept busy by inventing a one-man act, and thus a career was ignited.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My three least favorite words: "End of footnote."

  • By David H. Lawrence XVII on 06-20-17

Izzard Forever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

I knew nothing about Eddie Izzard when I decided to listen to this audiobook. Now I want him to be my best friend. Or my scout leader: someone who's philosophy I do BELIEVE, and want to follow.

The audiobook is uplifting, encouraging, and hilarious. I especially enjoyed the footnotes to footnotes, and live-while-recording special content in the audiobook that's not in the published memoir.

A very special and wonderful companion audiobook especially recommended for long solo drives.

  • Railsea

  • By: China Miéville
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cowley
  • Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 165
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 165

On board the moletrain Medes, Sham Yes ap Soorap watches in awe as he witnesses his first moldywarpe hunt: the giant mole bursting from the earth, the harpoonists targeting their prey, the battle resulting in one's death and the other's glory. But no matter how spectacular it is, Sham can't shake the sense that there is more to life than traveling the endless rails of the railsea - even if his captain can think only of the hunt for the ivory-coloured mole she's been chasing since it took her arm years ago.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Talented Mr Cowley a mismatch for Railsea

  • By H James Lucas on 06-07-12

Mesmerizing, Not Meaningful

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

I love Jonathan Cowley's voice and the subtle characterizations he performs for this book. However, I often felt like the narrator missed the *meaning* of the language. The story itself suffered because the narrator appeared not to pay attention to the content. Examples of this are sudden breaks mid-sentence (I assume because of a line-wrap) and bad timing that killed the humor.

I've since gotten a copy and gone back to re-read bits that were confusing in audiobook form. I think Railsea as a book is truly about language, storytelling, and the meta-awareness of conversation between old texts and new. The narrator's lack of attention to detail detracted from just how impactful and above all else FUNNY this book should be.