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Daniel

North Potomac, MD, United States
  • 28
  • reviews
  • 27
  • helpful votes
  • 36
  • ratings
  • A World Undone

  • The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918
  • By: G. J. Meyer
  • Narrated by: Robin Sachs
  • Length: 27 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,090
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,861
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,846

The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed 20 million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today. World War I is unique in the number of questions about it that remain unsettled. After more than 90 years, scholars remain divided on these questions, and it seems likely that they always will.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Overview of the "Overshadowed" War

  • By Andrew on 12-14-12

World War Tragedy.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-17

Any additional comments?

I've read a few books on WW1, and this one is very good. The author does a good job of getting into the decision making, particularly for the German, French, and British commands. He also does a good job in getting into some of the backstory on different elements of the war, such as the role of women, the German policies with regard to Jewish recruits, the ruling families and governments, and the like. No one volume can cover a whole conflict, but this one is a fine volume to start with.

  • Janesville

  • An American Story
  • By: Amy Goldstein
  • Narrated by: Joy Osmanski
  • Length: 10 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 328
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 278
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 280

A Washington Post reporter's intimate account of the fallout from the closing of a General Motors assembly plant in Janesville, Wisconsin - Paul Ryan's hometown - and a larger story of the hollowing of the American middle class. This is the story of what happens to an industrial town in the American heartland when its factory stills - but it's not the familiar tale. Most observers record the immediate shock of vanished jobs, but few stay around long enough to notice what happens next, when a community with a can-do spirit tries to pick itself up.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How did I miss this one in 2017?

  • By NMwritergal on 11-25-18

If Hillary read this book, she'd be President now.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-17

Would you listen to Janesville again? Why?

I don't generally listen to books twice, so I would not listen again. I would recommend it.

Have you listened to any of Joy Osmanski’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

First performance. It was good.

Any additional comments?

I think the book should be required reading for politicians to see the actual impacts of the job losses in middle America. Janesville, Paul Ryan's hometown, suffered after the closure of the GM plant in 2008. The author follows the story of several people in town over the course of 8 years, from the laid off to the well off. Not everyone makes it, and all have to adapt. Bottom line is that it is not about jobs but about wages and jobs. Everyone found a new job, but no one was making more money after GM. She did not chronicle anyone that moved from town, which is often necessary for work. Finally, the book would have been really outstanding if the author had managed to have some access to GM and UAW decision making on the inside. She can only see from the outside and so we really don't know the full story of what was behind the GM move to close Janesville but keep other plants.

The Island at the Center of the World audiobook cover art
  • The Island at the Center of the World

  • The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan
  • By: Russell Shorto
  • Narrated by: L.J. Ganser
  • Length: 14 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,128
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 622
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 627

Nearly 40 years ago, a New York State Library archivist discovered 12,000 pages of extraordinary records from the original Dutch colony on Manhattan. After decades of painstaking translation, the documents became the primary source for this breathtaking history of early New York.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Wealth of Information, but Continual Repitition

  • By Steven on 05-31-05

Filling in the Blank Spaces in American History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

I wasn't sure what to expect when I picked up this book, but boy was I pleasantly surprised. Russell Shorto takes us back to the 17th century, to when many Northern European powers were all vying for space in North America. He takes us into the new Dutch colony on the island of Manhattan and indeed the expanse of greater New York City (including my hometown of Staten Island). Our history books seem to count the Dutch interlude from 1624-1664 as a blip, but in fact there were multiple generations of Dutch who founded and developed New York (or New Amsterdam) and its environs. As Shorto says, the documents have only been translated in the last 30 years or so, and that story is as amazing as anything else in the book. It's a well written book and I think a valuable addition to any early American history buff or serious historian.

  • The Warmth of Other Suns

  • The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
  • By: Isabel Wilkerson
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles, Ken Burns (introduction)
  • Length: 22 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,446
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,959
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,943

In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to previously untapped data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the most amazing books I have ever read!

  • By Ernest on 04-09-12

Should Be Required Reading for Everyone

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

I got Ms. Wilkerson's book on the recommendation of my mother in law. It's not a short book, but the stories keep you interested as it traces the life of three African-Americans who make the journey from South to North (and in one case West) in the early 20th century. The 3 could not be more different, but what they faced was sadly the same--a racist and dangerous culture in their home towns that compelled them to leave. It's also an interesting intersection of sociological-economic factors. Socially, people migrated to areas of the north that other members of their town or community had previously gone, just like the Irish, Italians, and others from Europe. Economically, it showed how the northern recruiters needed the labor and sought in in the south, while the established order in the south sought to prevent its low cost labor force from leaving. The characters in the book are real people and far from perfect, but you'll come to know them and take them in your heart.

  • Rampage Nation

  • Securing America from Mass Shootings
  • By: Louis Klarevas
  • Narrated by: Christopher Price
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

In the past decade, no individual act of violence has killed more people in the United States than the mass shooting. This well-researched, forcefully argued book answers some of the most pressing questions facing our society: Why do people go on killing sprees? Are gun-free zones magnets for deadly rampages? What can we do to curb the carnage of this disturbing form of firearm violence?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Depressing, but Inciteful Facts we should all know

  • By Andrew A. on 08-02-18

With Mass Shootings Almost a Weekly Occurrence, everyone needs to read this book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

Rampage Nation is certainly not a light read, but a very necessary one for all of us. Dr. Klarevas focuses on the problem of mass shootings in American society, skillfully using case studies such as the Virginia Tech massacre of 2007 and the Aurora Theater shooting of 2012 to paint a grim picture of how the availability of military grade weapons and disturbed individuals leads to life changing and life ending tragedy for ordinary people caught up in the madness. He takes on the "good guy with a gun" theory that is being peddled about and demonstrates that this idea, while sounding good in 30 second sound bites, has no basis in fact. He offers common sense prescriptions for the problem that protect American gun owner rights while also greatly enhancing public safety.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Our Man in Charleston

  • Britain's Secret Agent in the Civil War South
  • By: Christopher Dickey
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 129
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 121

The unlikely man at the roiling center of this intrigue was Robert Bunch, an American-born Englishman who had maneuvered his way to the position of British consul in Charleston, South Carolina, and grew to loathe slavery and the righteousness of its practitioners. Bunch used his unique perch and boundless ambition to become a key player, sending reams of dispatches to the home government and eventually becoming the Crown's best secret source on the Confederacy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not a spy novel

  • By Michael Battle on 06-21-16

Antebellum South Through Foreign Eyes

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

This book offers a great insight into the pre Civil War South as well as the war years. The focus of the book is the British Counsul in Charleston. Britain had a number of Consuls in the south during the war, offering invaluable insights into what was going on there and trying to get British subjects out of the Confederate army. I think it is a nice addition to any Civil War buffs library.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • After the Civil War

  • The Heroes, Villains, Soldiers, and Civilians Who Changed America
  • By: James Robertson
  • Narrated by: Barry Press
  • Length: 11 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 19

Returning to the turbulent days of a nation divided, best-selling author and acclaimed historian James Robertson explores 70 fascinating figures who shaped America during Reconstruction and beyond. Relentless politicians, intrepid fighters, cunning innovators - the times called for bold moves, and this resilient generation would not disappoint.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • An Introduction Only

  • By Daniel on 01-07-17

An Introduction Only

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

This book offers you a good introduction into many of the characters of the post Civil War era. The sketches are pretty superficial but can help if you are looking for interesting people for more in depth biographic reading.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Hillbilly Elegy

  • A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
  • By: J. D. Vance
  • Narrated by: J. D. Vance
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,788
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,891
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,828

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis - that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over 40 years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening!

  • By Gotta Tellya on 09-11-16

An American Story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-17

This is a great story of a guy that overcame the odds. It's a very American tale. I hope that counselors and others trying to help kids like JD read this book.

  • Unbroken

  • A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
  • By: Laura Hillenbrand
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,438
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 33,174
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 33,248

Why we think it’s a great listen: Seabiscuit was a runaway success, and Hillenbrand’s done it again with another true-life account about beating unbelievable odds. On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared.... 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Indescribable

  • By Janice on 12-01-10

Great Listen, recommend.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-15

Any additional comments?

This is a compelling story and Edward Hermann is a great narrator. Hillenbrand really does her research into all of the details of the story. It's not the first book on Zamperini (he wrote two himself) but it is a really good one to learn alot about him, the Japanese camps, and his amazing story of survival.

  • World Order

  • By: Henry Kissinger
  • Narrated by: Nicholas Hormann
  • Length: 14 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 925
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 810
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 806

Henry Kissinger has traveled the world, advised presidents, and been a close observer and participant in the central foreign policy events of our era. Now he offers his analysis of the twenty first century's ultimate challenge: how to build a shared international order in a world of divergent historic perspectives, violent conflict, proliferating technology, and ideological extremism.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More retrospective than future oriented

  • By Scott on 10-23-14

Dry listen

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-15

Any additional comments?

There are alot of interesting insights in here, but it's not an easy book to listen to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful