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Blood Type audiobook cover art

I'm fueled by the rage this book induced

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-18

Reyna is stupid. So so so stupid. When presented with two options, she invariably chooses the dumbest possible interpretation of the worst option. I needed something to listen to while knitting and I chose this clunker. I disliked her almost immediately, but kept expecting her to get smarter. She did not. Beckham was also terrible and it says a lot that, in a novel full of murderous vampires, it was Reyna who annoyed me the most.

I haven't disliked anything this much in ages, but I've got more knitting to do so onward to book 2! Do yourself a favor and skip this whole series, unless infuriating and illogical are your jam.

Fashioned for Power audiobook cover art

Diminishing returns

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-18

Each of these sisters has less common sense than the one who came before her. It's amazing that the two younger sisters made it to adulthood. This book drove me nuts because Allegra seemed too dim to have accomplished what she had professionally. And I liked Finn a lot and wanted better for him. I couldn't get through this whole book. I like this author's political romantic suspense books much better than this series, which I'm giving up on.

Into the Fire audiobook cover art

Were Leila and Vlad always this terrible?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-17

I listened to this book mostly in shock. I don't know if they've become extra awful or if I just didn't realize their true natures, but these people (vampire people) were jerks. They believed that being in love justified whatever they decided to do. Nobody outside their little bubble of two was safe. I don't even want to guess this book's body count. It's a good thing that this was the final book in the seeie because I was done with these hypocritical sociopaths regardless. Also, while I normally love Tavia Gilbert, her narration did nothing for me this time out. This book didn't work for me on any level.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful

Hunting Julian audiobook cover art

Are you kidding me? This is stockholm syndrome 101

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-14

Oh the spoilers

Xe Sands did a great job of narrating this BS, but I still feel gross for having listened to it.

I didn't listen to this book until months after I'd purchased it, so I no longer remember why I got it. The description of this book makes the events that take place sound very different than the way they actually unfold. Asia is not a willing visitor to Julian's planet. He takes pride in saying that he never lies to her, but he withholds information and generally takes advantage of his ignorance of his planet.
Asia is Julian's kindra, some sort of mystical soulmate who, when joined with Julian, has an ability to generate a huge amount of the energy that the people of Julian's world need to survive. This isn't bad. What sucks is that Asia is mistreated by just about everybody she encounters on the world that she never chose to go to. Julian and her own sister call her selfish for not immediately giving up everything she has ever known or wanted in order to nourish the people of the dimension TO WHICH SHE WAS KIDNAPPED. What the everloving hell is wrong with these people?
Why are do so many of the characters, including Asia, buy into the idea that she's selfish for not immediately falling into line with what her kidnapper, his people, and his kool-aid drinking people want from her? There are suffering people everywhere, but if somebody kidnapped me and used this as an excuse, I'd still be pretty pissed off about the whole thing.
He didn't even give her a real apology until 75% of the way into the book. AND it was only because she hurt his feelings. HIS FEELINGS. Also, the author somehow fanwanks her own book and makes the kidnapping Asia's fault? Oh my god I can't even

The Wise Man's Fear audiobook cover art

Kvothe's story becomes even more engrossing!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-13

The second day of Kvothe's story is more interesting than the first! For one thing, we now have some understanding of who he is, so his recitation of his life means more. For another thing, more happens. The events that comprise the myth of Kvothe began in the first novel, and here we see more of what made Kvothe a legend in his own time. We also get the first inkling of how it was for Kvothe to be confronted with his reputation whilst going about his daily life.

We also get more of a juxtaposition between the younger, powerful Kvothe and present-day Kvothe, who seems greatly altered and reduced. The mystery of how he went from being the person in the stories to being the person telling the stories is a tantalizing one. His relationship with Bast is also rounded out here. Bast is an interesting character in his own right, and I am looking forward to hearing how he became Kvothe's student.

One thing that bothered me is that Mr. Podehl's narration wasn't consistent. He pronounced names such as Fela and Devi differently in this book than he did in the first, but then alternated between the two pronunciations of Fela throughout The Wise Man's Fear. This was initially confusing, but then just annoying.

Although the audio version of this book was 42 hours long, I listened to it in the span of several days, because it was just that interesting. I completely understand how Mr. Rothfuss isn't churning these books out every year, due to their length and awesomeness, but I am eagerly anticipating the third book in this series.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

The Name of the Wind audiobook cover art

Highly entertaining book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-13

I was skeptical when I friend recommended this book to me. In general, I don't end up being particularly drawn to fantasy books written by men. I have zero interest in wizardry and protracted fight scenes, and I usually hate the way that women in these books speak and act. That being said, I'd ignored enough of this friend's book suggestions that I was starting to feel impolite. I picked up the print edition at the library, but 700+ pages of something I already wasn't into didn't help me become more motivated.

On a whim, I checked to see if there was an Audible edition, and purchased it when I saw that there was. I am now patting myself on the back for this. With the obstacles that I mentioned earlier, I might not have read this book otherwise, and I would have missed out on a real treat.

Kvothe is such a great protagonist! Mr. Rothfuss does an excellent job at capturing a smart, funny character who is nevertheless very young. Kvothe is the very definition of somebody who is at times too smart for his own good. I laughed at his wit, and winced when it got the better of him. This book is a marvel; there are so many beautiful passages, and Mr. Podehl did a great job with the various accents and inflections in this book.

This book is so many things. As soon as I finished it, I started the second book, which was, if anything, even better. I highly recommend this series, even to those who wouldn't normally read this type of book.

Princess Elizabeth's Spy audiobook cover art

Entertaining second entry in the series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-13

I really liked the first book in this series. Maggie is an interesting protagonist, and is pleasantly flawed. I like her mixture of rational assessment and irrational assumption. Even though her mathematical aptitude means that she's used to approaching things logically, it's interesting to see her sometimes make decisions with her heart, rather than her head. As with the first book, I found the interpersonal relationships in this book to be more captivating than the mystery, but this isn't necessarily detrimental, as the mystery is plenty interesting on its own.

I recommend this series for any combination of:
- fans of period pieces
- those obsessed with all things British
- people who root for the underdog
- those who enjoy books with strong female protagonists
- people who loved watching Indiana Jones rout the Nazis
- people who felt like offing themselves after reading Atonement

Going Cowboy Crazy audiobook cover art

Ridiculous but cute

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-12

The premise of this book is stupid. Let's just admit it. The thing that it has going for it is that the author seems to realize this as well. Although I nearly stopped listening after the first hour, when idle thought had revealed half a dozen ways that the central problem of this book could have been solved, I did like the characters, who were more complex than the formulaic premise might lead one to believe.

This story definitely requires the suspension of disbelief, but if you stick with it, I believe you'll find the results rewarding.

Elemental Reality audiobook cover art

Incredibly stupid story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-12

The promise I found in this book's description was never realized by the actual book. The writing is SO bad. The main characters, though they're in their late teens/early 20s, sound like the kids on my nephew's Nickelodeon shows. The dialog is strangely dated, though, and would be more appropriate in a book set in the 1990s. It sounds as though the author internalized the dialog of Scream, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Dawson's Creek, and then bastardized those speech patterns in this book. If I'd done a facepalm every time I heard some improbable turn of phrase in here, I'd have the imprint of my palm tattooed on my forehead.

Although the characters are always talking, they usually manage to avoid sharing important or useful information with one another. Why? I suspect they're just as bored with themselves as I am.

I suspect that I wouldn't have hated this book quite as much in print, but the whiny voices of the characters, combined with the bizarre and unconvincing mythology of this world, make me really regret purchasing this book.

You've been warned.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

First Grave on the Right audiobook cover art

Great narration for an extremely enjoyable book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-11

I borrowed this print book from the library and read a few pages before putting it down for good. I returned it and forgot about it. I barely remembered it when I came across it again on this site. The description drew me in again, and I took a chance on the audio version. Boy, am I glad that I did! For me, Loreliei King's narration brought me into Charley's world in a way that words on the page did not (and I LOVE books). I had intended to listen to this just on my commutes or when I was knitting, but then I began to listen at home when I should have been doing other things! I finished this book quickly, and came back for part 2, which was similarly awesome. The third book is out in print, but I'm waiting until I can get the audio to experience it, because for me, this series is now inextricably linked to Ms. King's voice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful