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Curatina

Moab
  • 18
  • reviews
  • 92
  • helpful votes
  • 340
  • ratings
  • Ulysses S. Grant: A Victor, Not a Butcher

  • The Military Genius of the Man Who Won the Civil War
  • By: Edward H. Bonekemper III
  • Narrated by: E. Roy Worley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 82
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 75
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 73

Ulysses S. Grant is often accused of being a cold-hearted butcher of his troops. In Ulysses S. Grant: A Victor, Not a Butcher, historian Edward H. Bonekemper III proves that Grant's casualty rates actually compared favorably with those of other Civil War generals. His perseverance, decisiveness, moral courage, and political acumen place him among the greatest generals of the Civil War - indeed, of all military history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very interesting history

  • By Katherine on 08-21-15

Good History; Poor Narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-16

Others have noted the narrator's odd pronunciations of place names, but what galled me was that he put a southern accent on Pemberton's words. It is unfair, but the narrator's ignorance reflects on the author and undermines his very good analysis of Grant and his rightful place in U.S. Civil War history.

  • Wolf Hall

  • By: Hilary Mantel
  • Narrated by: Simon Slater
  • Length: 24 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,779
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,863
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,870

In the ruthless arena of King Henry VIII's court, only one man dares to gamble his life to win the king's favor and ascend to the heights of political powerEngland in the 1520s is a heartbeat from disaster. If the king dies without a male heir, the country could be destroyed by civil war. Henry VIII wants to annul his marriage of twenty years, and marry Anne Boleyn.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Divorced, beheaded, died...

  • By Tim on 09-30-11

Enthralling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-15

This is a much better book than most historical novels. It seems to be fully researched and has finely drawn psychological portraits of many historical characters which casts them in a new more nuanced light.

  • Hitler

  • A Biography
  • By: Ian Kershaw
  • Narrated by: Alan Robertson
  • Length: 45 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 373
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 330

Hailed as the most compelling biography of the German dictator yet written, Ian Kershaw's Hitler brings us closer than ever before to the heart of its subject's immense darkness. From his illegitimate birth in a small Austrian village to his fiery death in a bunker under the Reich chancellery in Berlin, Adolf Hitler left a murky trail, strewn with contradictory tales and overgrown with self-created myths. One truth prevails: the sheer scale of the evils that he unleashed on the world has made him a demonic figure without equal in the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Excellent Read

  • By Rodney on 09-19-13

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-14

This is an excellent biography of a difficult subject who still remains opaque when one tries to view him as a person. Perhaps that is the ultimate triumph of will.

I have only two slight complaints. The first is my own lack of judgment. I chose to listen to this book instead of the several volume work in the interest if economy. I regret that decision because this version does seem a bit truncated and I fear I missed some details I would have liked. Perhaps this will only be a problem for those who have read extensively in this era if history. I do urge people who love indulging in the details of history to listen to the other books.

The second is the narrarator who overall is excellent. He brutally mispronounces many German words. Naturally, being British, he does it with a savior faire that almost convinces one that he must be correct, but when he constantly says "Liebensraum" instead of "Lebensraum," my ears protest. Surely the producer of the audiobook should have noticed. This is not merely a mispronunciation but the substitution of one word for another and an entirely different concept!

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Zeitoun

  • By: Dave Eggers
  • Narrated by: Firdous Bamji
  • Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,175
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 710
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 720

When HurricaneKatrina struck New Orleans, Abdulrahman Zeitoun - a prosperous Syrian-American and father of four - chose to stay through the storm to protect his house and contracting business. In the eerie days after the storm, he traveled the flooded streets in a secondhand canoe, passing on supplies and rescuing those he could. A week later, on September 6, 2005, Zeitoun abruptly disappeared.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Something bold, ebullient, yet quiet

  • By Darwin8u on 10-08-13

A Glimpse Into Another World

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-13

I listened to this book quite a while ago, and loved it. I was surprised to see reviews complaining that there were too many unnecessary details. I felt this was a bit like saying there were too many notes in a symphony.

I liked the book because it was essentially the story about people I don't know and don't see in America. It was compelling because it is the story of a woman to converted to Islam on her on accord and then later met and married an Islamic man. These are people I would never meet except through a book like this. I didn't find the story of their lives at all boring. Perhaps it is because I am a woman. Women and families are as interesting to me as big events and crisis.

Then there is the horror of Katrina and Zeitoun's disappearance. I did not know things like this happened during Katrina. I did not know that American citizens could be subjected to this treatment. What was inspiring to me was Zeitoun's wife. Her love, her determination, her refusal to be passive inspired me.

This is a good book. It's on sale right now. Buy it!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Feast for Crows

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,483
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,880
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,885

Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jarring change in Dotrice's performance

  • By Pi on 06-21-12

Horrible Narration & Missing Part of the Book.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-12

I wonder if the Audible people even read these comments. First this Roy Dotrice whose narration was acceptable if not good in the first books, is chewing the scenery so much in this book that it???s difficult to hear the story. I had to turn the volume down sometimes because he was shouting so unpleasantly. His voice is rather rough when he speaks normally, and I think it makes it difficult for him to do a voice effectively for a young beautiful woman, but that???s no excuse for making these women sound like old harridans. Everyone else has commented on the horrible voices, and I agree with all they say.

I must add that I am not overly picky about narration. I can survive almost any narrator, but this was just too much. People who gave him two stars are being generous.

I absolutely agree that the book should be redone. There???s one segment of the story, and I can???t tell you what it was because I blocked it out the voice was so awful, but it???s some religious fellow who is preaching his religion. The book begins with this segment. I seriously could not follow any of it. And I???m a person who generally listens to non-fiction history and science. I???m used to following intricate material.

BUT ??? here???s the kicker. The fourth part of the book cut off at 2 hours, 33 minutes, and 9 seconds right in the middle of a sentence. It???s not even there. I tried downloading it again, and it still wasn???t there. I didn???t find this mentioned in any other review, so it is apparently a glitch in my version.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Making of a Marchioness

  • By: Frances Hodgson-Burnett
  • Narrated by: Lucy Scott
  • Length: 8 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 275
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 248

Frances Hodgson Burnett published The Making of a Marchioness in 1901. She had written Little Lord Fauntleroy 15 years before and would write The Secret Garden in 10 years' time; it is these two books for which she is best known. Yet Marchioness was one of Nancy Mitford's favourite books, was considered 'the best novel Mrs Hodgson Burnett wrote' by Marghanita Laski, and is taught on a university course in America together with novels such as Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Daisy Miller.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Sweet Romantic Tale

  • By Curatina on 11-23-11

A Sweet Romantic Tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-11

This is a romance in the Victorian style. The characters are rather stylized and in the case of the protagonist, idealized.

Nevertheless it is a sweet tale that drew me in and made me care about the two main characters. The goodness of the heroine might put off some listeners, but if you allow yourself to be pulled in and love her, the rest of the story will keep you in suspense and entertain you.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The End of Normal

  • By: Stephanie Madoff Mack
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Madoff Mack
  • Length: 6 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 281
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 260
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 255

An explosive, heartbreaking memoir from the widow of Mark Madoff and daughter-in-law of Bernard Madoff, the first genuine inside story from a family member who has lived through - and survived - both the public crisis and her own deeply personal tragedy. In this candid insider account, she talks about her idyllic wedding to Mark, what it was really like to be a part of the Madoff family, the build-up to Bernard's confession, and the media frenzy that followed. It is about the loss of the fairytale life she knew and the tragic and final loss of her husband.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Somewhat interesting, but dreadful narration

  • By Curatina on 11-23-11

Somewhat interesting, but dreadful narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-11

Unfortunately, the author chose to narrate the book. Her voice is nasal and annoying.

I will give the author credit for not making herself a heroine. She comes across as a very difficult person who behaves selfishly many times.

The book presents a skewed view on the exposure of Bernie Madoff. This author flatly says that the two sons exposed their father, but other accounts I have read of the affair have described the investigation differently.

One does develop a sympathy for Mark Madoff and the sad end to his life, but other than gaining insight into the what propelled him to take his own life, the book does not add much information to what is already known. Most everyone in it, including the author, appear to be rather shallow, mean, and materialistic.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Shallow Graves in Siberia

  • By: Michael Krupa
  • Narrated by: Branko Tomovic
  • Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

This is Michael Krupa’s story of how in 1939 he escaped the German invasion of Poland only to be captured by the Red Army, accused of espionage and interrogated in the notorious Lubianka prison. He was then sent to the infamous Pechora Gulag, where most inmates died of overwork and starvation within a year. Amazingly, Kupra then escaped and made the gruelling journey from Siberia to Afghanistan. This is a remarkable true story of survival and also gives a chilling insight into the brutality of Stalinist Russia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Harrowing Story of Survival

  • By Curatina on 11-23-11

Harrowing Story of Survival

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-11

This is a nearly incredible story of a young man who during WWII was caught up in the eerily irrational cruel world of the Stalin Gulag. The story tells of the terrible treatment of prisoners, and the tender heroism of those who helped the narrator escape. It???s a one of a kind memoir.

The Narrator adopts a very slight polish accent, but it does not intrude or distract from the reading of the book.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Galileo

  • By: J. L. Heilbron
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 17 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 23

In 1610, Galileo published the Siderius nuncius, or Starry Messenger, a "hurried little masterpiece" in John Heilbron's words. Presenting to the world his remarkable observations using the recently invented telescope, Galileo dramatically challenged our idea of the perfection of the heavens and the centrality of the Earth in the universe. Indeed, the appearance of the little book is regarded as one of the great moments in the history of science.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Stick to the printed version

  • By Tp on 06-28-11

A Difficult Book for Audible

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-11

First, the book has a great deal of detail and is extremely informative. That is the good part. The bad part, for me at least, is that the book contains many mathematical formulas and all of them are read out loud. I'm not saying I could understand them even if I looked at them, but listening to them is incomprehensible to me. Also the author refers to drawings and points on the drawings have letters, so there is a great deal of "the lever at point 'h' is swung to 'l' " etc. It makes no sense without seeing the drawing. Also if you get the book, you must be prepared for a great deal of discussion about physics and mathematics. It's really more scientific history than just a biography. It's well done, but perhaps not a good choice for an audible book.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Tenth Parallel

  • Dispatches from the Fault Line between Christianity and Islam
  • By: Eliza Griswold
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert
  • Length: 11 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 73
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

The tenth parallel - the line of latitude seven hundred miles north of the equator - is a geographical and ideological front line where Christianity and Islam collide. More than half of the world’s 1.3 billion Muslims live along the tenth parallel; so do sixty percent of the world’s 2 billion Christians. Here, in the buzzing megacities and swarming jungles of Africa and Asia, is where the two religions meet; their encounter is shaping the future of each faith, and of whole societies as well.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Beyond the Middle East

  • By Robert on 10-01-10

Informative

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-11

I don't have much to add to the excellent reviews already provided. I recommend the book because it will provide information not readily available elsewhere. The author reveals her biases early in the book. However she seems to provide both sides in a dispassionate manner. The book is more concerned with presenting the opinions of individuals than in presenting a "definitive" account of the conflicts it describes. I did not think the book dwelled on global warming in particular except to emphasize that the conflicts, which are more about the competition for resources than religion, are exacerbated by the climate changes that affect this area just north of the equator more than any other area. If you are interested in third world countries and Africa in particular, this is a stimulating and valuable book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful