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Gotta Tellya

Knoxville, TN
  • 194
  • reviews
  • 724
  • helpful votes
  • 215
  • ratings
  • Red Rising

  • By: Pierce Brown
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 16 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,016
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,649
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,606

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children. But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow, what a performance and what a story

  • By Jared G on 08-27-16

One is enough.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

I didn’t like this one enough to want to continue with the series. Too bad, as it had potential, but overshot the mark.

  • God, If You're Not up There, I'm F*cked

  • Tales of Stand-up, Saturday Night Live, and Other Mind-Altering Mayhem
  • By: Darrell Hammond
  • Narrated by: Darrell Hammond
  • Length: 8 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 274
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 267
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266

Tina Fey’s Bossypants meets David Carr’s The Night of the Gun in Darrell Hammond's groundbreaking memoir, God, If You’re Not up There, I’m F*cked - a raw look inside the troubled life and mind of an American comic genius.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A "must listen" for Hammond fans

  • By Karen on 08-12-18

So that’s what happened!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

Darrell Hammond is a fantastic comic and impersonator. Everyone knows that. I suspect many don’t know why. I’ll stop here and leave that discovery up to the listeners. This is a very well written, wonderfully narrated soul bearing. Don’t miss it.

  • New York

  • The Novel
  • By: Edward Rutherfurd
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 35 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,377
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,867
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,854

New York is the book that millions of Rutherfurd's American fans have been waiting for. A brilliant mix of romance, war, family drama, and personal triumphs, it gloriously captures the search for freedom and prosperity at the heart of our nation's history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic!

  • By Rachel on 12-17-09

Long. But NYC has quite the history.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

I was born in New York. My parents grew up in the Bronx. I have an ancestor who came to New Amsterdam with Stuyvesant. My New York roots run deep. I was excited over the prospect of listening to this book. I found aspects of the book to be quite revelatory and fascinating. But those aspects were mainly those of historical fact. I didn’t get the same satisfaction from the fictional part of this “historical fiction” work. Some characters’ lives were so interwoven with those of actual historical figures that I couldn’t help thinking of Forest Gump and his unlikely encounters with the movers and shakers of the later 20th century. The core families of the book seemed to have a finger in every political and economic pie, and that is not realistic. I was, however, deeply moved by the last chapters, where the author wrote of 9/11. That part of the book was gripping. The rest was interesting to various degrees, but also very long.

  • Kiss Me Like a Stranger

  • My Search for Love and Art
  • By: Gene Wilder
  • Narrated by: Gene Wilder
  • Length: 6 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,091
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 846
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 846

Gene Wilder is one of the great comic actors who defined the 1970s and 1980s in movies. From his work with Woody Allen, to the rich group of movies he made with Mel Brooks, to his partnership on screen with Richard Pryor, Wilder's performances are still discussed and celebrated today.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting for a number of factors.

  • By A reader from Philadelphia. on 04-17-05

I miss Gene Wilder!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

This is such a nice memoir. The story is as endearing as the author, who also narrates his work. I’ll keep this book on my short list of those I hope to listen to again, very soon.

  • One Doctor

  • Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine
  • By: Brendan Reilly
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,235
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,137
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,131

An epic story told by a unique voice in Ameri­can medicine, One Doctor describes life-changing experiences in the career of a distinguished physi­cian. In riveting first-person prose, Dr. Brendan Reilly takes us to the front lines of medicine today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Brilliant

  • By Jan on 06-20-14

Rambling wool-gathering.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

The author/doctor opened up his heart and his personal history in writing this book, which took courage and a unique degree of humility, rare in an MD. I’m glad that I listened to the entire thing. A few times, I almost quit. The author’s approach is rather circuitous, wandering back and forth between stories about his patients, stories about himself and explanations of his opinions on the current and future states of healthcare, not of all which are in sync with my own professional conclusions. If you don’t mind the randomness, you’ll probably like this book. I was mildly put off by the author’s approach to telling his story, particularly by his overly lengthy tale of a couple he cared for as a young MD and the impact these people had on his life and career. That section of the book went on and on and on. I’m a “less is more” kind of person. For readers who like length as well as depth, this won’t be an issue. As for the narrator: Rob Shapiro is fabulous, as always.

  • Ticker: The Quest to Create an Artificial Heart

  • By: Mimi Swartz
  • Narrated by: Lydia Mackay
  • Length: 9 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65

It wasn’t supposed to be this hard. If America could send a man to the moon, shouldn’t the best surgeons in the world be able to build an artificial heart? In TickerTexas Monthly executive editor and two time National Magazine Award winner Mimi Swartz shows just how complex and difficult it can be to replicate one of nature’s greatest creations. Part investigative journalism, part medical mystery, Ticker is a dazzling story of modern innovation, recounting 50 years of false starts, abysmal failures, and miraculous triumphs.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • People Magazine Version of Medical history

  • By Campion Quinn, MD on 08-26-18

Didn’t hate it, didn’t like it.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

Overall this audio book is just OK. I gleaned some interesting info re the history of the effort to create a practical version of an artificial heart. I wasn’t pleased that said info was dumbed down for public consumption. Nor did I care for the author’s reliance on cheesy similes and metaphors. Worse were the comments made re various physycians’ and other characters’ sex appeal, which might be relevant in a gossip column but didn’t seem appropriate in this context. Last but not least was the narrator, whose smooth style is better suited to sleep aide commercials and not so much to a book on a fascinating, serious medical device.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Atlas of a Lost World

  • By: Craig Childs
  • Narrated by: Craig Childs
  • Length: 9 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 351
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 318
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 318

From the author of Apocalyptic Planet, an unsparing, vivid, revelatory travelogue through prehistory that traces the arrival of the First People in North America 20,000 years ago and the artifacts that enable us to imagine their lives and fates. This book upends our notions of where these people came from and who they were.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lyrical musings on a lost world

  • By Tracy Rowan on 09-13-18

Meh!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-18

I am fascinated with the subject matter of this book. Unfortunately, the content is overly dependent on the imaginative ruminations of the author. But the worst part is that the author narrates his own work in a rushed, often monotone fashion. I couldn’t sustain focus and lost interest in trying. I quit listening after the first several chapters,

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Passage of Power

  • The Years of Lyndon Johnson
  • By: Robert A. Caro
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 32 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,051
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,775
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,767

The Passage of Power follows Lyndon Johnson through both the most frustrating and the most triumphant periods of his career - 1958 to 1964. It is a time that would see him trade the extraordinary power he had created for himself as Senate Majority Leader for what became the wretched powerlessness of a Vice President in an administration that disdained and distrusted him. Yet it was, as well, the time in which the presidency, the goal he had always pursued, would be thrust upon him in the moment it took an assassin’s bullet to reach its mark.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • From Powerful to Powerless

  • By Abdur Abdul-Malik on 05-08-12

Thorough and enlightening.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

Robert Caro is a fabulous researcher and writer. This very long book is packed with personal and political information about the life and times of LBJ. Its main focus is on the assassination of President Kennedy and LBJ’s successful assumption of presidental powers. Caro gives tons of background information on the struggles of Johnson’s early life, his time as leader of the Senate, and his frustrating years in the political limbo that is the Vice Presidency. Caro writes extensively about the Kennedys as well as other political figures of the era. This book can stand alone for the reader in illuminating the whole package of those involved and the times in which they lived and functioned. Even though this book ran for 32 hours of listening time, I was bored only once—when Caro described in detail the conservative resistance in Congress and the Senate to the Civil Rights bill. The word “filibuster” alone was enough to make me yawn. I confess to skipping almost three whole chapters at that point and returned to the story after the bill had been passed. Other than my allergy to the bill-passing process, I found this book to be fascinating. The narration by Grover Gardner deserves more than 5 stars! I was 12 years old when President Kennedy was assassinated, so Johnson’s presidency went on in the background during my high school years and seemed defined by the nation’s negative reaction to the Viet Nam war. I listened to this book by Caro in the hopes that I would discover more about LBJ as a person and a leader, and I was not disappointed. I learned a tremendous amount. And while I can’t say that I find LBJ totally likable, he certainly had many good points, particularly his compassion for the poor, for people of different races, for the sick and for the elderly. When it came to helping people in need, LBJ made it happen.

  • Private Games

  • By: James Patterson, Mark Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Paul Panting
  • Length: 9 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,117
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,867
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,860

Private, the world's most renowned investigation firm, has been commissioned to provide security for the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Its agents are the smartest, fastest, and most technologically advanced in the world, and 400 of them have been transferred to London to protect more than 10,000 competitors who represent more than 200 countries. The opening ceremony is hours away when Private investigator and single father of twins, Peter Knight, is called to the scene of a ruthless murder: a high-ranking member of the games' organizing committee has been killed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well done

  • By Hollie on 03-01-12

Bad narration, mediocre story.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-18

I enjoyed the first two books in this “Private” series, even though they dealt with the vacuous lives of Hollywood types. The protagonist, Jack, head of Private, manages to retain appeal in spite of his tendency to think with his—other brain. In fact, almost all of the characters are three dimensional and interesting, and the plot elements were well constructed. While listening to those two books, I stayed engaged easily and couldn’t wait to find out what happened next. Not so with Private Games. The narrator is horrible. It isn’t his British accent that bothered me so much as his irregular pacing, reading too slowly or too quickly. His character portrayals were poorly done and inconsistent. Maybe that wasn’t entirely the fault of the narrator, as the characters are poorly written. They are barely two dimensional. Characters get introduced, then nearly disappear. I couldn’t sustain interest in any of them. Right now I’m at the part where investigator Knight, main character in this book, is about to hand over the care of his children to one of the villains, ostensibly a nanny, after a cursory background check. Too obviously wrong. I can’t take it anymore. I’m getting my credit back. Fortunately, this seems to be a stand-alone volume in the Private series and won’t be missed if skipped.

  • People Who Eat Darkness

  • The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo - and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up
  • By: Richard Lloyd Parry
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 13 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,133
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,934
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,940

Lucie Blackman - tall, blond, 21 years old - stepped out into the vastness of Tokyo in the summer of 2000 and disappeared. The following winter, her dismembered remains were found buried in a seaside cave. The seven months in between had seen a massive search for the missing girl involving Japanese policemen, British private detectives, and Lucie’s desperate but bitterly divided parents. Had Lucie been abducted by a religious cult or snatched by human traffickers? Who was the mysterious man she had gone to meet? And what did her work as a hostess in the notorious Roppongi district of Tokyo really involve?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is the audiobook against I rate all others.

  • By El_Ron on 03-08-13

Horrifying, and true.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

This is a well written account of the death of a young, all too naive woman living and working in Japan. I can’t comment further because spoilers are inevitable. It’s well written, matter of fact and worth a listen. I especially recommend this book to any young women considering living and working alone in foreign countries—not to discourage such adventures, simply to emphasize the need for caution.