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Nicholas

Comstock Park, Michigan, United States
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  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 14
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  • Kill the Farm Boy

  • The Tales of Pell Series, Book 1
  • By: Kevin Hearne, Delilah S. Dawson
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 447
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 432
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 428

A plucky farm boy will find more than he’s bargained for on his quest to awaken the sleeping princess in her cursed tower. First there’s the Dark Lord, who wishes for the boy’s untimely death...and also very fine cheese. Then there’s a bard without a song in her heart but with a very adorable and fuzzy tail, an assassin who fears not the night but is terrified of chickens, and a mighty fighter more frightened of her sword than of her chain-mail bikini. This journey will lead to sinister umlauts, a trash-talking goat, and the Dread Necromancer Steve....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By Bruce D. Parker on 07-18-18

Single best literary reference ever

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

As I imagine is the case with most people who eagerly awaited Kill the Farm Boy, I am a huge fan of Kevin Hearne from the Iron Druid Cronicles. So I was quite excited to hear he is embarking upon a satyrical romp through classic fantasy. Admittedly, Kill the Farm Boy starts off very strong and, throughout the book, maintains an interesting cast of characters. Unfortunately, the Book does not have Hearnes usual well-timed humor; rather, Kill the Farm Boy is somewhat overloaded by low-hanging jokes and some of the same ideas are repeated again and again until you can practically make the joke for the book. All this being said, I appreciated the book for what it is and, as the headline states, the single best literary reference I have ever come across is barried Deep within the novel... when a Troll is caught Reading "Alliance of Nincompoops". I would certainly read the second in the series, when it comes out, but would just warn that the book, while enjoyable, might grow tiresome for people expecting anything like Iron Druid.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Lost City of the Monkey God

  • A True Story
  • By: Douglas Preston
  • Narrated by: Bill Mumy
  • Length: 10 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,281
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,974
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,973

Since the days of conquistador Hernán Cortés, rumors have circulated about a lost city of immense wealth hidden somewhere in the Honduran interior, called the White City or the Lost City of the Monkey God. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who fled there to escape the Spanish invaders, and they warn that anyone who enters this sacred city will fall ill and die.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Danger and Discovery in the Jungle

  • By Jim N on 01-08-17

Honduras’ past and Archeology’s Future

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

Stories of lost cities, lost civilizations or lost explorers fascinate me. (Maybe I just get lost a lot so can sympathise). After reading the Lost City of Z and several Arctic Adventures, the Lost City of the Monkey God was an obvious next listen. What I immediately appreciated from this book was the fact it is modern; the book details the search for a lost city in the Honduran jungle that took place within the last decade. In particular, the author enters into explanation of the new science of discovery: using Lidar to map inaccessible or hostil environments. While delving into Honduras’ past, we are also seeing a glimpse of archeology's future. Unfortunately, the author abandons talk of the jungle about three-forths of the way through the book and enters into a drawn-out description of a parasite a number of the members of the exploration picked up. Although related, this creates a huge contrast and feels as though you are reading an entirely different book. Nevertheless, it does provide some interesting musings on the infections that swept across Latin America shortly after the arrival of Spanish explorers and, indeed, a warning about what diseases might again threaten humanity.

  • The World of Poo

  • By: Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Helen Atkinson-Wood
  • Length: 2 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 99

From Snuff: "Vimes looked at the cover. The title was The World of Poo. When his wife was out of eyeshot he carefully leafed through it. Well, okay, you had to accept that the world had moved on and these days’ fairy stories were probably not going to be about twinkly little things with wings. As he turned page after page, it dawned on him that whomever had written this book, they certainly knew what would make kids like Young Sam laugh until they were nearly sick. The bit about sailing down the river almost made him smile.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Its about Pooh without an h, but with humor

  • By Jacobus on 06-10-12

A Necessary Discworld Compendium

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-13

The World of Poo is a necessary guidebook for any hopeful tourist to the Discworld. We follow young Jeffry as he travels to the bustling city of Ankh Morpork for the first time. Along the way, Jeffry discovers the amazing world of Poo in all it's many forms. We examine the poo of some of the Disc's most fascinating animals, from the elephants of Hawandaland to the Gargoyles of the great city. We even journey into Harry King's personal poo empire.


The World of Poo is a creative piece of "children's literature" and draws upon many of the characters and places we are familiar with from other Discworld novels. Pratchett captures the viewpoint of a six-year-old boy who has a curiosity for poop... as do all little boys. Especially interesting is his description of the changing digestive system of the Ankh Morporkian gargoyles.

One cannot help but wonder... what kind of poop does great Atuan produce?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Triplanetary

  • Lensman Series
  • By: E. E. 'Doc' Smith
  • Narrated by: Reed McColm
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 340
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 240
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 243

From the atomic age in Atlantis to a world remote in space and time, two incredible ancient races, the Arisians and the Eddorians, are in the midst of an interstellar war - with Earth as the prize.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Lensman Series is Still Fun

  • By DJM on 03-18-09

Historical Science Fiction

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-13

The Lensman series is an important piece of historical science fiction. Many examples of modern day SF--from the epic Hyperion novels of Dan Smith to comics like the Green Lantern--pay homage, in part, to the Lensman series. Doctor Smith showed awesome imagination in his creation of the multiple races and worlds. I found it especially interesting to note that Triplanitary focuses on a racial breeding program that spans thousands of years. When considering this book was written in the 1930's, it is even more impressive.
When reading Triplanitary, it is important to remember that this book was written during a different era. Men and women have roles which tend to horrify a person raised in the 21st century. Furthermore, Doctor Smith's love story within the book seems somewhat contrived and childish. Time, too, is something Doctor Smith seems not to fully grasp. In the span of a few hours, his characters are able to construct massive space ships and discover here-to-for unknown technology.

Unfortunately, this audio book suffers most from a narrator that exaggerates the books weak love story. The narrator is adequate, but the characters he voices tend to sound the same and his women will make you cringe.


Again, this book is important as an example of the development of the science fiction Genre. Though it suffers from weak characters and an implausible timeline, it stands out for it's originality. Sadly, the narrator let's the story down perhaps further than what it deserves.