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  • 9
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 9
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  • Ardulum: First Don (Volume 1)

  • By: J. S. Fields
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4

Neek makes a living piloting the dilapidated tramp transport Mercy’s Pledge and smuggling questionable goods across systems blessed with peace and prosperity. She gets by - but only just. In her dreams, she is still haunted by thoughts of Ardulum, the traveling planet that long ago visited her homeworld. The Ardulans brought with them agriculture, art, interstellar technology...and then disappeared without a trace, leaving Neek’s people to worship them as gods. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • now THIS is a tale well told

  • By Kay on 08-02-18

now THIS is a tale well told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

So OK, so I was drawn in to give this a listen, as I always am, by the always stellar work of narrator ☆LYNN NORRIS☆, who never fails to bring warmth, intelligence, flawless pacing, and characters delineated with the input of an excellent ear and a strong, thoughtful take on each personality and how they all factor into the action. That said, sometimes I've felt that the material she's had to work with in the past fell a bit short of her prodigious gifts to bring it to vivid life — a windfall for that author, but mildly disappointing to me when the story didn't give her the richest chance to show what she can clearly do.

And then: ARDULUM. At long last, a story giving Lynn Norris some real red meat, with deep, rich characters; spectacularly detailed (but fully accessible) and clearly knowledge-based science that challenges religious superstition but potentially enhances and informs spirituality (Dancing Wu-Li Masters, anyone?); a moral universe that provokes thought and aspiration but never proselytizes or gives easy answers; fully realized cultures to relish; gender fluidity (including coined pronouns for those who don't fit into the more rigidly conservative constructs of some Terran mentalities of our time, though here, new genders are unequivocal genotypes); no overt romance (so far), leaving one's imagination free to take telepathic connection into a still more intimate realm; and action and suspense aplenty, always in service of the excellently paced plot.

Ms. Norris does her magical thing in spades here, creating delicious accents and/or intonations for the various sentient species, within which framework individuals are still miraculously discrete; handling the scientific jargon like a pro; bringing just the right emotional tone and muscularity to each scene, encompassing everything from tender vulnerability to life experience-based indecision to occasional shameless relish in violence (particularly of the vendetta variety). I was in the hands of a master. And especially with material this good, that is a fine place to be.

This is the first of a series, apparently, and I am thrilled at the prospect of more, as the combo of J.S. Fields and Lynn Norris is a dynamic synergy that knocks my socks off. The story's breathless and contemplative by turns, and introduces us to a universe that is chock-full of mysteries great and small, some resolved here, but some of which I predict will be unraveled in the books to come.

I can't wait.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Casanova Embrace

  • By: Warren Adler
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 11

From the carcass of a Washington, D.C. car bomb explosion, the CIA launches an investigation into the mysterious events leading to the assassination of Chilean dissident and infamous casanova, Eduardo Allesandro Palmero. As CIA investigator Alfred Dobbs rummages through the evidence, Palmero's mysterious life, from heir to the Chilean oligarchy to a fist-raising Marxist and trickster in disguise, comes to light. But what Dobbs soon discovers soars beyond his wildest imagination. At the height of international terrorism, Eduardo fights his war with an unlikely weapon - seduction.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Mystery,suspense,history mixed with a lot of sex

  • By cosmitron on 05-19-18

Women on the Verge of a Co-dependent Breakdown

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-18

I'll start with what I liked about this audiobook: the incandescent talents of ☆LYNN NORRIS☆ as narrator are, as always, fully deployed in service of the story. Chilean Castellano, which for those unfamiliar with the accent and its idiosyncrasies, is a delicious and endearing, very distinctive and somewhat slurred sound that comes off a little drunk, and in which sentences nearly always end in a gratuitous "po" (something like the Canadian "eh?", if you will), is not remotely easy to convey in the accented English required for this story. And of course, Norris's main job is to convey as clearly as possible the sense of the text, in any event spoken largely here by highly educated, patrician characters who would be committed to sounding as high-caste and intelligible as possible. So that's a pretty tall order to convey in this narrative! What Norris does is amazing: she gets the "music" of the Chilean sound, its inflections and pitch variations, while ensuring that the dialog is always crystal-clear. A major feat. And, as always with Lynn Norris, the vocal character delineations are impeccable. I am such a fan of her work, and so enjoyed hearing that mellifluous voice employed with characteristic skill and variety. Norris also tosses off French and American accents without a hitch, and does an endearing (Of Mice and Men) Lenny-like character with respect and warmth. Just a huge talent.

I wish the enjoyment I got from the narration carried over to my impression of the story as well. I tell ya, it's not the easiest thing to listen to a saga about three intelligent, educated, fairly functional (at the outset) women who are in the thrall of a Latin lover who (aside from a beautiful body, presumable skills in bed, and the apparent (in the author's view) girl-catnip of emotional unavailability) has no particular on-the-page attributes that would besot the three of 'em so instantly and thoroughly. Sadly regressive in the Me Too era. The two-dimensional character stereotypes throughout the novel were also highly disappointing. But Lynn Norris is ☆easily☆ worth the price of admission.

I was given this free review-copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

  • Second Coming

  • First Fruits, Book 2
  • By: Amanda Carney
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 9 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

When Parsley Walker's fairytale happy ending with her dark lover is threatened, she must risk everything to get it back. Even if it means facing the most dangerous enemy of all. Even if it means dying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a phenomenal roller coaster ride

  • By Shadowplay on 04-23-18

☆!!!tour de force narrative!!!☆

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

If you could sum up Second Coming in three words, what would they be?

love's magic wins!!!

What other book might you compare Second Coming to and why?

I'd compare Second Coming to the first book in this trilogy, First Fruits. I very much enjoyed the first book — particularly the brilliant narration of Lynn Norris — but much territory in that book was taken up with exposition: our world crammed with supernatural players and a rich history of this shadow world, unperceived by "normal" humans.

In the second novel, plot baseline well established, we see much more of the deep, lavishly detailed and nuanced world of supernatural beings, in which even the "good" characters sometimes suffer from longstanding prejudice. Like the best of science fiction/fantasy, this story reflects societal ills and personal foibles with which we can all identify and, in a context of high adventure, romance, and a climactic full-on battle with detail at once ravishing and devastating, we're shown ways in which even the most evolved among us can grow.

A delicious array of characters and circumstances provides a vivid palette at last worthy of the simply prodigious vocal and interpretive talents of ☆LYNN NORRIS☆, who limns character after character with masterful detail and seemingly endless energy and range. I was nonplussed at first by the tack of voicing consistently third-person narrative in the voice of a single character appearing in each scene (rather than in a neutral narrator's voice), but I came to appreciate the extra emotional color and clarity afforded by plot advancement via a particular character's apparent perspective. A total innovation, in my experience. Way to go, Lynn Norris! I've made no secret of my admiration for her truly enormous narrative gifts, and this outing just takes the proverbial cake. Amanda Carney must be over the moon to have someone rise fully to the challenges of bringing her elaborate, panoramic plot to breathtaking life. Norris goes from strength to strength, and is destined to be a shining star in the audiobook universe.

Which scene was your favorite?

Truly, there are so many beautifully realized scenes in this book, but the true tour de force I referred to in my headline has to be the battle scene near the end of the story. The energy is just headlong, as Lynn Norris throws herself fully into breakneck tempo with perfectly enunciated, crystal-clear yet wholly passionate relating of Carney's stunningly detailed, no-holds-barred narrative of battle that feels like the memoirs of veterans, it's so emotionally real. Whoa. Just virtuosic. And in the midst of violent chaos and peril, we actually learn more, through revelation of their thought processes, about the principal characters, without sacrificing an atom of excitement. Breathtaking work by both author and narrator.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Magic power's great. Love and courage are better.

Any additional comments?

If you love great romantic fantasy-adventure, this book's for you. Read the trilogy in order, though; if the second book is any indication, it's just gonna get better and better.

  • The Council

  • Witch's Ambitions Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Kayla Krantz
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22

The Council is the governing Coven over the Land of Five, a region entirely inhabited and split apart by witches with varying powers. Lilith Lace, a witch thought to be born powerless, happily resides in Ignis, the Coven of Fire, until she suddenly develops telekinesis, an ability only seen in some witches born in Mentis, the Coven of the Mind. When the Council finds out about her odd development, she's taken under their wing and is finally told the truth.... Everything she's learned about the Land of Five, herself included, have been nothing but lies.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I find myself looking forward to the next book...

  • By Lonnie-The GreatNorthernTroll-Moore on 09-08-18

talk about a cliffhanger!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-18

Would you listen to The Council again? Why?

If I did, it'd be for Lynn Norris. It's all about Lynn Norris. She has style, substance, wit, real intelligence, beautifully delineated characters — and oh, that voice.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

To be honest, the story is not that compelling for me, despite the energy the fabulous narrator, Lynn Norris, infused into every character and plot point. It's a decent plot, but the writing is pedestrian and gratuitously ungrammatical, with too many words just plain misused; malapropisms are indefensible in the age of Google. Also, it's all in first-person, but with glaring faux pas for that MO throughout: the narrator says stuff like, I couldn't hear what he said, and then quotes what he said verbatim. That kinda thing just yanks me out of the moment, and is such an easy fix: just switch POV now and then!

Most interesting? I guess the whole supernatural thing, for which I had high hopes going in; it can be such a gas if it's given its full due (which it emphatically wasn't in this case). The least interesting bit is the marked absence of rich, discrete cultural detail for each of the covens; the protagonists' trip through each one is cursory at best, the "mission" the characters are on is an absurd failure in terms of the paltry amount of time spent in each coven's territory, precious little interaction with inhabitants that aren't already known to them, and the lack of thought and effort they expend in identifying subversives before hustling on to the next locale. A disappointingly lazy construction of a world with little texture or nuance, leaving only the lasting impression of Lynn Norris's always exceptional work.

Oh, and BTW, that's a truly shameless (and again, lazy!) cliffhanger at the end of this book.

What about Lynn Norris’s performance did you like?

Two major things stand out here: her beautifully detailed vocal characterizations (of which my favorite here is probably Lazarus, though he's but a cameo — and that's the point, of course. No opportunity to expand the palette is overlooked.), and her full-on commitment to the breathless terror and excitement of the battle scene at the end of this story. Norris's rendering of dialog is always natural and flowing, but the identity of speakers is never lost in complicated exchanges. And her voice, the instrument itself, is just beautiful and clear at all times. She elevates the text far beyond its intrinsic value, and delivers a flawlessly paced, intelligent, emotionally rich performance. I actually search on the Audible site for books read by her. She never fails to engage and delight.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Hey, Lilith:

Are you a good witch, or a bad witch?

Do you know?

Any additional comments?

Can't wait till the material offered to Lynn Norris is worthy of her extraordinary talents.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • First Fruits

  • By: Amanda Carney
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 8 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31

Parsley Walker didn't want to fall in love. She wanted to pour coffee, serve flapjacks, and forget that she could read minds. But then fate walked in, and he had dark hair and a dark mood, and he looked at her like she was the only woman in the world. Jesse Linwood intended to blow into town, grab the girl, and get gone. Instead, the girl grabbed him with her shy smile and sad eyes. Now, his cold, black vampire heart beats for her alone, but he isn't the only one who craves her. To keep her safe, he must pick a fight he knows he cannot win.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Rough start

  • By Kimberly Smith on 09-24-17

vamp thriller bursting with bloodlust and erotica

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. As always when I listen to her narrative, Lynn Norris takes the prize. She hasn't yet landed a book fully worthy of her talents, but it's just a matter of time, as her reputation grows. I've yet to encounter a character that she couldn't fully embody with her vocal gifts. Always serving the story, she brings more excitement and definition to each person (undead or otherwise) than the words alone convey.

The more colorful characters are cake for her, but the mainstream ones are more difficult to project, seems to me; it requires a kind of simplicity and authenticity, seasoned with deep social intelligence, to give them dimensional life with the voice alone. And this she does in spades. Every time. But oh, the character acting! From the languorous, feline Patrick (think George Sanders or, for younger readers, Alan Rickman's Snape), whose casual evil exudes ennui and depravity in equal measure, to the warm and nurturing Lou, who knows exactly who she is, and recognizes another loving soul when she sees one, Norris handles a wide disparity of character and accent with ease and naturalness. A real actor. It's a spine-tingling pleasure.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I'd have to say Parsley. That kind of ingenue can be a bit dull in the wrong hands, but Parsley grows on you. While maintaining vocal integrity for each character, so that no one is ever confused with another, Lynn Norris still manages to convey with her voice the evolution of her ingenue as she learns to love and trust, as she opens fully to her sexual nature, as she finds more strength and resilience than even she knew she had — she who's had many opportunities already in her young life to dig down for endurance and resourcefulness.

What does Lynn Norris bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

What doesn't she bring? She's a writer's dream. See above for the long, long list of attributes that make her simply outstanding.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Learning to love on the run from an ancient evil.

Any additional comments?

This book badly needed a copy editor, especially at the beginning. That Patrick, the elegantly evil 1000-year-old vampire sire of Jesse and Felix and Bane, would not know the past participle of "drink" is laughable and ridiculous. That verb, of all verbs, for a vampire! Had *drunk*, lady, *not* had drank!! Lots of cliche verbiage, too. But both grammar and style seemed to improve as the book progressed — which may be a function of my getting more invested in the story, but I think it's more likely that the writing itself improved. I was all in by the end, abrupt though it was. Talk about a cruel cliffhanger! Looking forward to the next book; hope it's on its way soon!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Colin

  • A Serial Killer Romance
  • By: JB Duvane
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

It started with the mannequin heads. They were my escape, my solace, my companions in the darkness. But the day came when they weren't enough. That's when I started taking the girls. But Avery? She's not like the others. She's beautiful - so beautiful - but I can't hurt her. I need to keep her with me...forever. He should terrify me. I'm his prisoner. I've seen what he did to the others. How can I believe him when he says he won't hurt me? But there's more to him than darkness. There's a terrible sadness.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not worth it

  • By Sharina Smith on 08-26-18

are you ready for this?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-17

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Well, hmm. Sorta.

The reason I came to this is in the first place is that I am always game for anything narrated by the great *Lynn Norris*. First, there's the sheer pleasure of having her clear, mellifluous voice filling the room as I kick back and enjoy. Second, she's simply a genius at naturalistic dialog, and elevates the quality of everything she reads with lucid intelligence and deep but invisible emotional range. Love her character delineation. Her choices are impeccable, always. And she brings a side of lightly applied humor to the content. Always, always worth it, no matter what project she appears in.

(Plus, the book title was titillating. I admit I wanted to know more.)

Now, let's talk about the story. Can a college kid in her right mind fall for a serial killer? Who (spoiler alert) abducts her and holds her against her will? It's an extreme fantasy — Stockholm Syndrome and Co-Dependence On Steroids — and might represent the farthest end of the My-Love-Will-Heal-Him-And-Make-Him-All-Better spectrum, making my childhood fantasy of bringing Mr. Spock alive emotionally — the ultimate unavailable-man fantasy — seem like, well, child's play.

I'm a deep believer in bringing non-judgment to every encounter with another human being. Having worked at an agency that helps people involved with the criminal justice system turn their lives around, I've had strong friendships with people who've killed people, among other things, and we are all infinitely more than the worst thing we've ever done. But a love relationship with a serial killer, when you're little more than a kid yourself? Not a good idea, y'ask me. Way too complicated a pathology, way too malleable a mind; maybe one or 86 things to work out before you go all in, I think it's fair to say.

That said, the writing's pretty clean, plot-wise, though it's not stylish for my money, and needed some serious editing (e.g., "eyes big as saucers" used twice to describe the same character within a couple minutes; clichés galore; big ol' grammatical errors that contributed nada to character or color, in my view). For mindless fun, it's fine. It's certainly an original story idea, at least in my experience! And, as I said, Lynn Norris can read the phone book, or the cliché of your cherce, far's I'm concerned.

Would you be willing to try another book from JB Duvane? Why or why not?

If Lynn Norris is reading it, yes.

Have you listened to any of Lynn Norris’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes, I'm a huge fan of Lynn Norris, and have heard several of her audiobooks; I go out of my way to check them out. She's always fantastically talented, and leaves it all on the table every time. Comparing one performance to another is apples to kumquats, as she is entirely committed to each book, seems to me, and is such a pro that her energy and her sublimation of ego to the text are always 110%.

Could you see Colin being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Yeah, I could, if it were done in a tongue-in-cheek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer kind of way. Otherwise, the moral relativism would make for a lousy role model. No one in particular comes to mind to play the leads.

Any additional comments?

Check out anything read by Lynn Norris. It will be unforgettable.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Night Whispers

  • The Complex, Book 0
  • By: Calinda B
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

For two long terrifying years, Sakhi Borren, and her beloved brother Reve, are headed to live at The Complex. An enclosed metal and concrete manufactured world on the barren planet Lorn, the Complex is some government's version of a good idea. Its sole purpose is to "heal the rifts between warring races" - a joke if ever Sakhi heard one. If she and her brother can survive to the end, they'll leave, far richer. In the meantime, all they can look forward to is co-existing with criminals and the scumbags known as Metas.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a delighful story with lovely twist

  • By Cyn on 07-12-17

can Sakhi help humans and meta-humans coexist?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-17

Where does Night Whispers rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I find it hard to compare books to one another. This book has rousing adventure, romance, mystery, sci-fi and fantasy elements galore, and a message of forgiveness and inclusiveness — that good and evil exist in all forms, and not exclusively in any group — with which I wholeheartedly concur. Fantastic work by the reader, Lynn Norris. What an exciting, beautifully paced job she did! The characters were many and varied, the action often breathless, and she remained crystal clear and true to plot and character from start to finish. A riproaring yet highly intelligent, nuanced performance. In short, I'd rank this very high indeed among my audiobook experiences. I had a blast!

What other book might you compare Night Whispers to and why?

No specific book comes to mind, but this is certainly cinematic, and the formula's classic: our beautiful young heroine goes through a series of harrowing trials by fire to discover her own strength and resilience. Love teaches her at last to open her heart; only by this means can she ultimately save herself and countless others from immolation in the fires of hatred and prejudice.

What about Lynn Norris’s performance did you like?

She's a wonder, this one. Each character was fully fleshed, to include growth and greater depth as the story unfolds; this was true whether they were protagonists or "bad guys," though some of the latter were gratifyingly ambiguous right to the end. Her pacing was uncanny; she knew when to give us time to relish a scene, and when to fill others with crackling intensity and heartstopping momentum. I derived great visuals from her perfectly inflected descriptions that put me right in the action, and was so swept up that I could hardly believe I wasn't hearing footfalls and energy weapons! The love scenes, though not gratuitously explicit, were highly charged and erotic. Ms. Norris has just endless talent for rich, evocative narration. In short, *wow*.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Dreaming or awake, young telepath Sakhi is assaulted and beset. Can she learn to trust again, figure out *whom* to trust, and bring a peaceful end to the endless human-Meta conflict?

Any additional comments?

Some world-class talent on this project! No question: I'm gonna be looking for Lynn Norris when I buy audiobooks in future.

  • Gypsy's Quest

  • Gypsy Series, Book 1
  • By: Nikki Broadwell
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3

When Gertrude wakes up in a world steeped in the past, discovering that she's pregnant with no memory of how she got there, she panics. But when her baby is kidnapped she has to snap out of her stupor or lose everything she loves. It is only when she comes upon a sailor with turquoise eyes that all the disturbing memories begin to resurface. But despite what happened between them, he is her only hope.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Time-Travel Fantasy, Green Overtones

  • By Kay on 05-06-17

Time-Travel Fantasy, Green Overtones

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

What made the experience of listening to Gypsy's Quest the most enjoyable?

Loved the ego-free calm and clarity of the reader, Lynn Norris. Beautiful character delineation, with some delicious "cameos" (check out the cheeky affect and the flawless accent of the barmaid, Renee I think her name was), but I'm always impressed, and appreciative, when the narrator keeps complicated plot lines and multiple characters crystal clear from the get-go. Requires that the text is always put first, and flamboyant emoting is firmly left at the door (except for "pops" of character color for delicious contrast, which were sparingly applied to provocative effect). Beautifully acted, precisely because I didn't experience it as acting at all.

Although the text at the beginning of the novel surprised and faintly annoyed me with a rather matter-of-fact enumeration of a series of fairly insane events that would make any sane person a bit hysterical (even if our protagonist's a contemporary tarot card reader and psychic, and so possibly used to an oddity or two), I was swept up into the story in pretty rapid order. Good, solid basis for a series: post-apocalyptic reversion to pre-industrial technology, complete with characters and lore from the Norse pantheon, one or two mythical outliers (e.g. a Druid and a satyr), a ripping, rocky love triangle (ish), a self-aware ship that can navigate through time, a "green" message about greed, nuclear power, and their long-term tragic consequences, and the quest for a child abducted by his evil-witch grandmother — kept young and beautiful by predictably nefarious means! Looking forward to future installments.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Gypsy's Quest?

I think my favorite was the first bar scene in Glansgow (sp?), the wild-west-type harbor town where our heroine Gertrude must go disguised as a man. The narrator had a great time creating a memorable cast of shady characters for our delectation, and I was highly entertained by the riffraff she brought to light, as well as the changes in accent and affect that our male lead, Kefir (sp?), takes on when he's in mercenary mode. A nice juggling act, singlehandedly keeping all those characters distinct and, where appropriate, amusing.

Which scene was your favorite?

See above.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Nothing like a little time travel, amnesia, witches, Druids and satyrs, and a kidnapped baby to help you find out what you're made of . . . .

Any additional comments?

Give this a listen! I'm thinking this Lynn Norris is someone to keep an eye (ear?) on, too.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Touching His Robe

  • Reaching Past the Shame and Anger of Abuse
  • By: Leslie G Nelson
  • Narrated by: Lynn Norris
  • Length: 4 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3

Survivors of sexual abuse and assault often find themselves feeling like the woman who touched the hem of the Lord's robe to be healed: desperately needing the Savior's help, but feeling too full of shame and pain to approach him. When seeking help, survivors are generally counseled to forgive, but instead of bringing relief, this message often increases their shame and pain.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Processing deep & early wounds; warmly narrated

  • By Kay on 10-29-15

Processing deep & early wounds; warmly narrated

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-15

Would you consider the audio edition of Touching His Robe to be better than the print version?

I definitely would. Lynn Norris shows high intelligence, deep affinity for the text, and an inspired blend of consistent warmth, appropriate moments of emotional intensity, and reassuring, nurturing calm that guides us through everything from difficult revelation of wounds and the long, sometimes jagged healing process they precipitated, to wry moments of light relief, and everything in between. A truly beautiful, perfectly modulated voice, that brings clarity to sometimes challenging verbiage, and creates a place of safety in which we can explore this often raw topic. I wish every therapist could bring the loving presence she so naturally exudes.

I bet the author was simply thrilled to have this woman as her voice. I hope to hear her on many of your audiobooks, and will look for her name on future titles. If they're of any interest on their own, knowing I'll hear this wonderful, authentic, vibrant voice will certainly clinch the deal for me!

What did you like best about this story?

Leslie Nelson's very thoughtful and articulate, and I feel she's done real, serious work not only to excavate her own past and bring it up to the light and air to dissipate its pathology, but to give other abuse survivors significant tools to address their own stories and integrate them, this time exorcised (in an ongoing process) of the anger and shame that linger like the smell of rot if they're not also disinterred. It's so good, so life-affirming to understand that joy and wholeness are possible when repressed memories are cleansed, and when we learn, one thorny challenge at a time, how brave and resilient we can be.

I'm not conventionally religious, but as a spiritual person, I found the book immensely valuable with or without the Christian message, which was not overbearing -- something I felt the author worked consciously to achieve. Her Christian beliefs are clear, direct, and up front, but she never asserts that they're mandatory for anyone else to attain their own measure of freedom from the past. Nor does she give carte blanche to human or institutional representatives of Christ. Highly developed critical thinking, applied universally. I respect that.

Which scene was your favorite?

I don't know that it's a scene, precisely, but I loved Nelson's real-time narrative of the role mindfulness plays in dissipating emotional triggers/flashbacks and returning us to the present, as well as bringing resilience, perspective and joy to everyday moments. Probably confirmation bias; I'm a big practitioner of mindfulness!

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Not only did I want to; I am. I'm going to be tired at work tomorrow, but it's totally worth it!

Any additional comments?

Good, valuable book. Great, invaluable narrator.

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