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Tripp Southern

  • 16
  • reviews
  • 35
  • helpful votes
  • 267
  • ratings
  • Sea of Rust

  • A Novel
  • By: C. Robert Cargill
  • Narrated by: Eva Kaminsky
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 943
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 888
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 891

It's been 30 years since the apocalypse and 15 years since the murder of the last human being at the hands of robots. Humankind is extinct. Every man, woman, and child has been liquidated by a global uprising devised by the very machines humans designed and built to serve them. Most of the world is controlled by an OWI - One World Intelligence, the shared consciousness of millions of robots uploaded into one huge mainframe brain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Give me more Mercer

  • By Jerry on 11-06-17

FINALLY, a recently published book WORTH READING!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-22-18

Wow. A well written and original story published in the last 5 years? What a welcome surprise. Judging by the plot-less and poorly written books comprising the majority of SciFi published in the past few years how this one made it past the editors and into print is anybody's guess. Maybe they were all out getting milkshakes that day and left an intern at the desk instead.

Don't want to give anything away so I'll say nothing more than this; If you, like me, have been seriously contemplating cancelling your Audible account due to the paltry number new titles worth listening to hold off until you've listened to this one. You can always cancel afterwards.

  • Paradox Bound

  • A Novel
  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,554
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12,830
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,813

Nothing ever changes in Sanders. The town's still got a video store, for God's sake. So why doesn't Eli Teague want to leave? Not that he'd ever admit it, but maybe he's been waiting - waiting for the traveler to come back. The one who's roared into his life twice before, pausing just long enough to drop tantalizing clues before disappearing in a cloud of gunfire and a squeal of tires. The one who's a walking anachronism, with her tricorne hat, flintlock rifle, and steampunked Model A Ford.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Traveling through history rather than time

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 11-04-17

I want my 12 hours and 30 minutes back

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-17

Lame premise. Weak plot. Horrible ending. Yes, Clines other books all suffered one of these issues but still none made me feel robbed of the time I spent listening to them. Then came Paradox Bound. This is were I get off the Cline train. I will say that ray Porter’s narration is top notch. At least it’s got that.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Reality Dysfunction

  • Night's Dawn Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Peter F. Hamilton
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 41 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,865
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,656
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,646

In AD 2600, the human race is finally beginning to realize its full potential. Hundreds of colonized planets scattered across the galaxy host a multitude of prosperous and wildly diverse cultures. Genetic engineering has pushed evolution far beyond nature's boundaries, defeating disease and producing extraordinary spaceborn creatures. Huge fleets of sentient trader starships thrive on the wealth created by the industrialization of entire star systems, and throughout inhabited space the Confederation Navy keeps the peace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Finally on Audible!! My favorite Hamilton series!

  • By Patrick on 04-05-16

I could listen to John Lee read the phone book...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-16

...and pay to listen to it. That being said I'd say that if this had been such a recording it would have had a better plot than what Hamilton churned out for The Reality Dysfunction; i.e. at least you'd know that the reason Lee is reading through the "Smiths" was because there were Smiths in the phonebook. Too many loose ends. Could use editing, still. Just the same an enjoyable listen if not for Lee's soothing voice alone.

  • Saturn's Children

  • By: Charles Stross
  • Narrated by: Bianca Amato
  • Length: 13 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 321
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 244

In Saturn's Children, Freya is an obsolete android concubine in a society where humans haven't existed for hundreds of years. A rigid caste system keeps the Aristos, a vindictive group of humanoids, well in control of the lower, slave-chipped classes. So when Freya offends one particularly nasty Aristo, she's forced to take a dangerous courier job off-planet.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pleasent, Complicated Space Opera - Very Enjoyable

  • By GH on 01-31-13

Narrator is amazing, Stross at the top of his game

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-16

Chock full of smart, dry British humor, honest depictions of space travel and action. Lots of action. It's as if Alastair Reynolds, Arthur C. Clarke and Douglas Adams had a baby and raised him to be the most British of science fiction writers. And the cherry on top of this excellent space opera sandwich? The narrator, Bianca Amato. I could listen to her read the phone book, and pay money for the privilege. Saturn's Children is a credit well spent!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Aurora

  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Ali Ahn
  • Length: 16 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,575
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,382
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,379

A major new novel from one of science fiction's most powerful voices, Aurora tells the incredible story of our first voyage beyond the solar system. Brilliantly imagined and beautifully told, it is the work of a writer at the height of his powers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful

  • By ewreirct on 07-14-15

Deus Ex A.I.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-16

Aurora struck me as a short story or novella that the author padded the heck out to keep from having to return his publisher's advance. Thinly drawn human characters lacking any vestige of self-awareness and stilted character arcs. The AI's character arch was properly developed and even interesting through the first half of the book though the story it was narrating wasn't.

After half a book of anticlimactic crises narrowly avoided through human ingenuity the second half is straight up "Deus Ex AI" with the Ship's AI swooping in like the god-machines of Greco-Roman plays saving the now-bumbling idiot humans again and again. The ending was anticlimactic and the way KSR disposed of the only properly developed character of the entire novel was just plain lazy. Would not recommend.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Objects of Wrath

  • By: Sean T. Smith
  • Narrated by: Gabriel Vaughan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 257
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 238
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 241

After the bombs rain down, the entire world is an open wound; it is in those bleeding years that William Fox becomes a man. William flees with his family to Magnolia, a farm in Tennessee, while America descends into madness, anarchy, and death. With the aid of elite Special Forces units, Magnolia emerges as beacon of hope and stability. But evil is hungry and relentless. A new threat stalks the Earth. To save his people, and perhaps all of humanity, William must be more than a lethal soldier; he must become a hero.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A new series to listen to!

  • By MDY on 07-18-17

AVOID this one, reads like straight to ebook book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-15

There's the bones of a fine story here. With some editing, pruning and word economy it might have been great. Objects of Wrath reads reminds me of many of the self-published, straight to ebook novels I've read in the past.

There are "orphaned characters" that have all the characteristics of a "Chekhov Character/Gun" that are never mentioned again. Too much time is spent in the beginning setting the stage for the epic battle showdown between two radically different factions while very little time is spent on said epic battle, or in making me at least understand what drove the other side to travel so far in the first place.

Hopefully the author will work with an editor next time, and a mentor. He has potential he just needs focus and practice.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Line War

  • By: Neal Asher
  • Narrated by: David Marantz
  • Length: 17 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 73

The Polity is under attack from a "melded" AI entity with control of the lethal Jain technology, yet the attack seems to have no coherence. When one of Erebus' wormships kills millions on the world of Klurhammon, a high-tech agricultural world of no real tactical significance, agent Ian Cormac is sent to investigate, though he is secretly struggling to control a new ability no human being should possess... and beginning to question the motives of his AI masters.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Well told story but...

  • By DEAN on 02-05-19

Meh. Did not care a bit about Cormack in the end

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-15

And I've read most of the series too. Most of the Cormack series is enjoyable. This one is not.

0 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Proxima: Book 1

  • By: Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Kyle McCarley
  • Length: 17 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 445
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 408
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 406

The very far future: The galaxy is a drifting wreck of black holes, neutron stars, and chill white dwarfs. The age of star formation is long past. Yet there is life here, feeding off the energies of the stellar remnants, and there is mind, a tremendous galaxy-spanning intelligence each of whose thoughts lasts a hundred thousand years. And this mind cradles memories of a long-gone age when a more compact universe was full of light... The 27th century: Proxima Centauri, an undistinguished red dwarf star, is the nearest star to our sun. How would it be to live on such a world?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • No Sense of Conclusion

  • By Lisa Davidson on 04-24-16

This is NOT the Baxter of Vacuum Diagrams.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-15

The story is amateurish. Rife with two dimensional characters, Chekov guns that are never fully developed characters left hanging from their cliffs never to be heard from again. It's like Baxter bellied up to his publicist and shouted "I don't need no stinking editor, I can do this all on my own!" Spoiler, he couldn't. Where is the Stephen Baxter who wrote Vacuum Diagrams?

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Departure

  • The Owner, Book 1
  • By: Neal Asher
  • Narrated by: Steve West, John Mawson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 447
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 410
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 413

The Argus Space Station looks down on a nightmarish Earth. And from this safe distance, the Committee enforces its despotic rule. There are too many people and too few resources, and they need 12 billion to die before Earth can be stabilised. So corruption is rife, people starve, and the poor are policed by mechanised overseers and identity-reader guns. Citizens already fear the brutal Inspectorate with its pain inducers. But to reach its goals, the Committee will unleash satellite laser weaponry, taking carnage to a new level. This is the world Alan Saul wakes to.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Bites the Hand that Enslaves

  • By SciFi Kindle on 04-10-13

Asher is a lazy writer

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-14

Too much "Deus ex machina". Still, enjoyable in a average manner. I won't ask for my credits back but I would recommend you find one of the thousands of better authors out there before you dredge the middle of the "acceptable" barrel.

One complaint is that this and the second in the "series" are really one book. For a book to truly be one of a series, at least when said books are written by real writers and not hacks, there must be at the minimum, some kind of proper ending. Nope, not here. Be prepared to buy the second one if you want closure.

6 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Matterhorn

  • A Novel of the Vietnam War
  • By: Karl Marlantes
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 21 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,752
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,637
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,633

Why we think it’s a great listen: A performance so poignant, we gave Bronson Pinchot (yes, Balki from Perfect Strangers) our inaugural Narrator of the Year award.... In the monsoon season of 1968-69 at a fire support base called Matterhorn, located in the remote mountains of Vietnam, a young and ambitious Marine lieutenant wants to command a company to further his civilian political ambitions. But two people stand in his way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Matterhorn

  • By Zachary on 04-20-10

I can't stop thinking about this book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-13

I've always judged a good book as one that I enjoy reading and a great book as one that I can't stop thinking about once I've finished it. Two weeks out from finish and there's not a day that goes by that I don't think about something from Matterhorn.

It was tough getting through the first one or two chapters. I found the author's style clumsy and thought the protagonist a bit two dimensional. Heck, there were even times when I felt I was being whacked with an allegory stick. But that was just ME being lazy. once I slowed down and read (listened) I was engrossed.

I want to say so much more but...you need to read it yourself. I will say this thought. If like me, at the end of chapter one you think you don't like Matterhorn, don't stop. The journey may appear arduous and arbitrary and some of the characters a bit simple, but it was, sometimes is and many, many are. Stop looking for meaning in everything and just solider on.