LISTENER

Angela

Knoxville, TN, USA
  • 31
  • reviews
  • 139
  • helpful votes
  • 92
  • ratings
  • One Doctor

  • Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine
  • By: Brendan Reilly
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,424
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,315
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,309

An epic story told by a unique voice in Ameri­can medicine, One Doctor describes life-changing experiences in the career of a distinguished physi­cian. In riveting first-person prose, Dr. Brendan Reilly takes us to the front lines of medicine today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Brilliant

  • By Jan on 06-20-14

Practical illustration of modern US health care

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

It is true, as some reviewers have already mentioned, that Dr. Reilly doesn't tell his story in a linear fashion, so the listener does need to pay close attention. Since he is dealing with multiple patients, it's hard to see exactly how he could have written it any other way... Because each story has background information without which it wouldn't be complete.

This book is worth any extra effort involved. It shows how a modern big city teaching hospital operates, and lets the reader understand the historical reasons why the system operates as it does (and how the for profit motive impacts US health care). It's always much better as a patient to go into that system armed with facts and understanding. Since everyone gets sick at some point, and everyone dies, this is the kind of information that is universally useful.

For readers of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal, this is a good complementary listen.

  • The Coming Storm

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Michael Lewis
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,215
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,547
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,505

Tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis… Weather can be deadly – especially when it strikes without warning. Millions of Americans could soon find themselves at the mercy of violent weather if the public data behind lifesaving storm alerts gets privatized for personal gain. In his first Audible Original feature, New York Times best-selling author and journalist Michael Lewis delivers hard-hitting research on not-so-random weather data – and how Washington plans to release it. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why you shouldn't ignore the weather forecast

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 09-10-18

Every Voter should listen to this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

It's just two and a half hours, and it explains with concrete examples what your vote translates into at a federal level. This is the kind of information that can inform your decisions in the voting booth. A must listen.

  • Annihilation

  • Southern Reach Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Jeff VanderMeer
  • Narrated by: Carolyn McCormick
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,684
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,331
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,331

Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, bad narrator

  • By Julian P. on 01-26-16

Some people see a tunnel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

Some people see a tunnel, some people see a tower. I noticed some reviewers didn't care for Carolyn McCormick's reading - I thought she was absolutely spot on perfect for this story. With her mesmerizing voice,she completely creates the character of the biologist, even as you have to question every word that comes out of her mouth.

When I first started listening to this, I thought, "Roadside Picnic," But it's that and something more... The story is told from the viewpoint of someone already transforming into something alien, although when the transformation started, we can only guess. There are so many layers of duplicity here, the reader/listener hardly knows where to begin. But I love these juicy sort of literary puzzles. The biologist is about as unreliable as unreliable narrators can be, and so you can maybe guess some things from what other characters say about her... but how reliable are they?

All in all, it's beautifully written, beautifully read, and an entertaining piece of fiction as well. If you liked Gene Wolf's New Sun series, I can recommend this without reservation.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Crosstalk

  • By: Connie Willis
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 777
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 719
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 718

In a not-too-distant future, a simple outpatient procedure that has been promised to increase empathy between romantic partners has become all the rage. So when Briddey Flannigan's fiancé proposes that he and Briddey undergo the procedure, she is delighted! Only, the results aren't quite as expected. Instead of gaining an increased empathetic link with her fiancé, Briddey finds herself hearing the actual thoughts of one of the nerdiest techs in her office. And that's the least of her problems.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Learn when to say no

  • By Amazon Customer on 01-21-17

Loved the Narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-18

I love everything by Connie Willis, but when I first read the print version of this, I thought it was one of her weaker stories. It has all the stuff we CW fans love, like the detailed research, interesting facts, and the frustrating ends and outs of solving a puzzle, but I found the main character lacking. Finally I realized it's because we don't know what she does at her tech company. With all the meetings she ducks out of and people she avoids, it's never made clear what they need her for or what position she holds there, and I suspect she is one of those finance people who would have driven the characters from Bellwether crazy. Usually CW does better when her characters are scientists, or historians or other academic types. But I did go ahead and get this Audible version anyway... and I am happy I did. I loved it so much I listened to it twice in a row... Just because the narrator has such a pleasant voice to listen to and did such a great job with all the voices, male and female. She really brought the whole story to life.

  • Call the Midwife

  • A Memoir of Birth, Joy, and Hard Times
  • By: Jennifer Worth
  • Narrated by: Nicola Barber
  • Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,153
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,502

At the age of 22, Jennifer Worth left her comfortable home to move into a convent and become a midwife in postwar London’s East End slums. The colorful characters she met while delivering babies all over London - from the plucky, warm-hearted nuns with whom she lived to the woman with 24 children who couldn't speak English to the prostitutes and dockers of the city’s seedier side - illuminate a fascinating time in history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best book I've listened to this year

  • By Richard on 06-12-13

Awful narrator - could not finish

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-18

I really hate to give a bad review of a book based on the awful narrator, because this started out looking like a very interesting story, and I still might try to pick up a print version sometime. But here's the thing... just because you are reading about babies, it doesn't mean your listeners are babies. In fact, they probably aren't. Please save the cutsy babyish intonation for reading to your six month old, and read adult books about adult experiences using a normal adult voice. I gave it 30 minutes and couldn't stand anymore, and I don't even object to listening to books that were written for kids. I have a few in my library, and some of them I have listened to more than once. But this just totally missed the mark for me.

  • A Rage in Harlem

  • A Grave Digger & Coffin Ed Novel
  • By: Chester Himes
  • Narrated by: Samuel L. Jackson
  • Length: 5 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 689
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 686

Academy Award nominee Samuel L. Jackson ( Pulp Fiction, Star Wars films), fresh off the success of his uproarious, Audie-nominated performance of the mock children’s book Go the F**k to Sleep, delivers a swaggering, darkly-humored rendering of Chester Himes’ classic first novel.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hardboiled Goodness

  • By Ilana on 04-03-12

Perfect marriage of story and narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-18

This is a tightly written, suspenseful crime drama with a lot of sudden changes of fortune. Samuel L. Jackson is so right for this story, and so good at creating the different characters, that you can totally forget you are listening to someone read and lose yourself in the story. Really impressive considering what a distinctive voice he has. I listened to this right after listening to Brideshead Revisted read by Jeremy Irons, and both works are just stunning examples of what can be achieved by professional actors in bringing a story to life. Well done Audible. Let's have some more like this.

  • Bird by Bird

  • Some Instructions on Writing and Life
  • By: Anne Lamott
  • Narrated by: Susan Bennett
  • Length: 6 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,334
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,104
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,082

A New York Times best-selling author of both fiction and nonfiction, Anne Lamott was also the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. As much a guide to writing as an exploration of the emotional challenges of being a writer, Bird by Bird offers a candid and often humorous look at how to tackle these varied obstacles.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A funny listen, but no writing samples to speak of

  • By Alice on 04-12-15

Read This Even if You Don't Want to Publish

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

I bought this book in the middle of the disastrous month of November 2016, probably hoping listening to something funny and non-political would cheer me up. And did it ever, only not in the way that I expected. It is full of humor, and very entertaining, so the book would be worth the credit if only for that. But this book is basically the writing course that she offers to lucky students who get to attend it in person, and I decided to follow her advice on writing - not that I had any plans on becoming a writer or getting anything published - but I just did the writing exercises for myself. It was amazing how effectively that helped improve my mood. It doesn't make any sense, but it worked; I felt almost completely restored and back to myself by the end of the book. Since that time, I have been recommending this book to almost everyone I know. The writing exercises that Lamott describes are useful exercises for anyone in any field, and if you are looking for a good way to improve your writing, following the advice in this book would be a great start. “Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes Entry”

  • The Last Season

  • By: Eric Blehm
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,009
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,830
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,835

Destined to become a classic of adventure literature, The Last Season examines the extraordinary life of legendary backcountry ranger Randy Morgenson and his mysterious disappearance in California's unforgiving Sierra Nevada - mountains as perilous as they are beautiful. Eric Blehm's masterful work is a gripping detective story interwoven with the riveting biography of a complicated, original, and wholly fascinating man.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well Written Character Study of an NPS Ranger

  • By Kindle Customer on 06-23-16

Better than Fiction!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-17

This is a suspenseful mystery with a fascinating cast of characters, but it's also a look at how undervalued the people who protect our national parks are. These are the people who risk their lives every day to look after our greatest natural resources, and, like teachers and so many others who give of themselves every day, simply aren't given the resources, pay or even acknowledgement of how much society values their contribution. Here is the story of a man who went back year after year for three decades to do seasonal work as a park ranger, was never offered a permanent position and rarely had any indication that his field reports were even being read. Yet he was considered one of the most knowledgable and capable rangers in the High Sierra. Throughout his career, radio problems cropped up again and again. Did such a problem ultimately lead to his death? We can't answer that, but I assume that the problem never got fixed because of budget cuts. No doubt the money that might have been used on our National Park Service got used for something more important, like bailing out banks or funding MIC projects. The way his widow is treated by the Department of Justice after his death will come as no surprise after hearing the rest of the story.
Jonathon Davis is good as always, and a great choice of reader for this compelling story.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Great Utopian and Dystopian Works of Literature

  • By: Pamela Bedore, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Pamela Bedore
  • Length: 12 hrs and 27 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 736
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 664
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 655

Can literature change our real world society? At its foundation, utopian and dystopian fiction asks a few seemingly simple questions aimed at doing just that. Who are we as a society? Who do we want to be? Who are we afraid we might become? When these questions are framed in the speculative versions of Heaven and Hell on earth, you won't find easy answers, but you will find tremendously insightful and often entertaining perspectives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A very enjoyable and educational audiobook

  • By N. H. on 04-06-17

Fascinating series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-17

I listened to this alongside another Great Courses lecture series, How Great Science Fiction Works, and they are both excellent and informative, well worth the credit; they sometimes cover the same writers but it's interesting to hear both viewpoints. I noticed that some reviewers have marked Professor Bedore down for including feminist and gender-related utopian and dystopian fiction. But this is just what made this series especially interesting for me. Her discussion of Octavia Butler really stands out as a highlight, although every lecture is packed with information and delivered with enthusiasm. Overall it's clear that people who have traditionally been regarded as second class citizens for long periods of history have a completely different take on surviving a society that doesn't value them, and in turn they give us a whole new take on the meaning of utoptia or dystopia. And this is ultimately what makes science fiction stand out from other genres - new ideas, new ways of looking at ourselves. After listening to this series, I have added a lot of books to my "to read" list, and I will definitely be listening to this one again.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Fault in Our Stars

  • By: John Green
  • Narrated by: Kate Rudd
  • Length: 7 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,253
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,187
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,289

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful Poignant Story

  • By AudioAddict on 04-25-13

Better than the usual star-crossed lover romance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-15

First of all the plot contains absolutely no surprises, and if you've ever read a Jodi Picoult novel, you know in advance how it's going to turn out. That's OK! In fact, it's what makes the book so remarkable; the writer takes what looks like a formulaic plot about romance between teenagers with cancer, and turns it into brilliant commentary about the struggle we all face with the knowledge of our eventual oblivion and a universe that is utterly indifferent to our concerns about what's going to happen after we are gone.

There is an interview with the writer at the end, and I don't think I am giving anything away when I mention that it took him years to write this novel. The time, care and attention really show. I applaud writers like this who respect their teenage audience enough to give them quality work. Well done.

The performance is worthy of this book. The narrator brings every character to life, and she gives just the right voice to the narrator, the teenage girl who is always struggling to breathe. Hearing her talk, you can almost forget that you are listening to a story but can believe that you are in the same room with her, hanging on her every word.