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Tim

United States
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  • Killing Commendatore

  • A Novel
  • By: Haruki Murakami, Philip Gabriel - translator, Ted Goossen - translator
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 28 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

In Killing Commendatore, a 30-something portrait painter in Tokyo is abandoned by his wife and finds himself holed up in the mountain home of a famous artist, Tomohiko Amada. When he discovers a previously unseen painting in the attic, he unintentionally opens a circle of mysterious circumstances. To close it, he must complete a journey that involves a mysterious ringing bell, a two-foot-high physical manifestation of an Idea, a dapper businessman who lives across the valley, a precocious 13-year-old girl, a Nazi assassination attempt during World War II in Vienna....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Masterpiece and A Good Novel To Start

  • By Elif Kaya on 10-18-18

​Mashup

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-18

​As a fan of Haruki Murakami, I was looking forward to read "Killing Commendatore" and bought it immediately as soon as it got translated to English. He is my top three authors of all time that I always jump to the chance to buy the next novel whenever he publish anything new. Murakami's style of writing hasn't changed much, if not at all. Once you read your first book by HM, you will either think that he is one of the greatest writers in modern time, or thinks that he is just talking about gibberish.

"Killing Commendatore" was much like his other works. Metaphors and metaphors, dreams within dreams, symbolism after symbolism and so on and so on. It was your standard HM's style of writing. This book felt like a mashup with "The Picture of Dorian Gray", "Stranger Things" and "Car Talk."

For those who already read "Killing Commendatore", you already know what I'm talking about by the examples that I gave. For those of you who are thinking about purchasing this book and not understanding my review, I can probably write a term paper on this book and my whole thesis could be the mashup between the three examples.

Once again, as a fan of this author, "Killing Commendatore" left me even more confused on what I just finished reading, but this is why what makes Haruki Murakami who he is. There is no specific genre for any of his novels. All of his books start off very linear, thinking to yourself that "you got this", but as you progress through pages after pages, you are lost in the gobbledygook. This is why I'm a fan of HM. None of his books fit in any genres.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Reverse of the Medal

  • Aubrey/Maturin Series, Book 11
  • By: Patrick O'Brian
  • Narrated by: Patrick Tull
  • Length: 10 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 905
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 665
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 660

Jack Aubrey is back in London after a successful mission. On the advice of an acquaintance he uses the time to invest some of his prize money. However when the investments link him to London's powerful criminal element and land him in jail it looks as if he has lost his post captaincy and the H.M.S. Surprise. It is once again up to ship's surgeon and covert agent Stephen Maturin to rescue his hapless friend.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Most Moving

  • By Jonathan on 01-24-08

One Star Below

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-18

It's been almost an year since I started this series and so far I just finished the 11th installment. I was about to give "The Reverse of the Medal" one star below than the usual reviews because I found the story drifting off from its core, but I never realized how much depth this author has. Patrick O'Brian was a remarkable writer. He was way ahead of his time. The transitions are so seamless that you find yourself cruising through the pages.

  • One Doctor

  • Close Calls, Cold Cases, and the Mysteries of Medicine
  • By: Brendan Reilly
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,087
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,003
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 995

An epic story told by a unique voice in Ameri­can medicine, One Doctor describes life-changing experiences in the career of a distinguished physi­cian. In riveting first-person prose, Dr. Brendan Reilly takes us to the front lines of medicine today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Brilliant

  • By Jan on 06-20-14

Not Patronizing the Patients

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

Dr. Reilly is not a celebrity physician or have a day time talk show, he is an ordinary doctor at New York Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical Center. Reading his personal memoir "One Doctor", you get a personal insight of what it's like to be a doctor in internal medicine and not a high price specialist.

Dr. Reilly is a brilliant writer. He lays out his book in the most simplest form, and not patronizing the patients with constant medical terms. He also explains our healthcare system and how to respect the patients' wants even though it's against their health.

I usually know what I want to read next before I get to the last spoken word, but "One Doctor" stood out to me as I was clicking through Audible, trying to find what to listen to next. I highly recommend everyone should read this book, either of paper, or on your screen, or through your headphones.

"One Doctor" should not be recycle in a second hand bookstore. This book should be a modern classic on humanity from a heart fill MD.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Salvation

  • Salvation Sequence, Book 1
  • By: Peter F. Hamilton
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 19 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 601
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 572
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 574

In 2204, humanity is expanding into the wider galaxy in leaps and bounds. Cutting-edge technology of linked jump gates has rendered most forms of transportation - including starships - virtually obsolete. Every place on Earth, every distant planet humankind has settled, is now a step away from any other. And all seems wonderful - until a crashed alien spaceship of unknown origin is found on a newly located world 89 light-years from Earth, carrying a cargo as strange as it is horrifying. To assess the potential of the threat a high-powered team is dispatched to investigate. But one of them may not be all they seem....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Wait For Book 2

  • By StrikitRich on 09-26-18

Lee's Voice

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

If it wasn't for John Lee's voice, It would had taken me longer to get through "Salvation". I'm a huge fan of Peter F. Hamilton and pretty much conquer all of his books, but this one was hard to finish. Too much build up that no payoff at the end. The overall plot felt really uniformed and very one sided. PFH has written better sex than what was presented in the book. I'm hoping the next future books in this series would be better. "Salvation" felt really structured, but I can listen to Lee's voice reading just about anything.

  • The Atomic City Girls

  • A Novel
  • By: Janet Beard
  • Narrated by: Xe Sands
  • Length: 8 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 142

In November 1944, 18-year-old June Walker boards an unmarked bus, destined for a city that doesn't officially exist. Oak Ridge, Tennessee has sprung up in a matter of months - a town of trailers and segregated houses, 24-hour cafeterias, and constant security checks. There, June joins hundreds of other young girls operating massive machines whose purpose is never explained. They know they are helping to win the war, but must ask no questions and reveal nothing to outsiders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I thoroughly enjoyed this book

  • By Mollie Morrison on 03-08-18

I Got Cheated

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

I felt that I got cheated out of my money when I bought "The Atomic City Girls" because it's the exact same story as "The Girls of Atomic City". The only difference is Janet Beard's version is fictional and Denise Kiernan's was historical and nonfiction. What is going on here? I'm guessing that Janet Beard got her inspiration from reading Kiernan's book and decided to choose a story from that historical piece and write a fake biography.

This idea is blowing my mind away and to be honest, I am a shame at writing this review. Just like Hollywood, authors are not creative enough to brainstorm and write something original? The true women and men gave their livelihoods at Oak Ridge. They were protecting our nation, but yet they only write fluff pieces of our history?

If you want to know what really happened at Oak Ridge and atomic bomb, try watching Manhattan from WGN. It's more accurate than this book. I was sad when the show got cancelled after just two seasons.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • American Wolf

  • A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West
  • By: Nate Blakeslee
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall, Nate Blakeslee
  • Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,467
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,367
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,357

Before men ruled the earth, there were wolves. Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction in the lower 48 states by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West. With novelistic detail, Nate Blakeslee tells the gripping story of one of these wolves, O-Six, a charismatic alpha female named for the year of her birth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Epic American Story

  • By Michael - Audible Editor on 10-17-17

06

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-18

​Sometime next year, my friends and I are going on vacation to Yellowstone. A friend of mine suggested that I read "American Wolf" before we go to Montana. I'm not an animal person and it is rare to read something about a pack of wolves, but as soon as I started this book, I was on the edge, wanting 06 to make it out of the pack. For nonfiction, Nate Blakeslee has done an excellent job at writing about the park, wild animals and politics. It's like watching Mutual of Omaha Wild Kingdom. This is one of my best reads of this year.

  • The Far Side of the World

  • Aubrey/Maturin Series, Book 10
  • By: Patrick O'Brian
  • Narrated by: Patrick Tull
  • Length: 14 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 953
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 708
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 705

The South Seas are a paradise for battle-weary Captain Jack Aubrey and ship's surgeon Stephen Maturin. But their peace is disturbed when Stephen's fancy for a peculiar marine organism lands him overboard. Acting in his usual headstrong fashion, Jack dives into the rescue, unfortunately failing to plan what will happen once they are both in the water watching the sails of the Surprise disappear in the mist.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What lies beyond is the far side of the world...

  • By Darwin8u on 05-08-17

Boobies

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-18

I had to smile each time I heard Patrick Tull saying "Boobies". After doing some research and asking my friend who read the entire series (twice), Patrick O'Brian was making a joke about birds. I'm at the midway point of the series (book #10) and so far "The Far Side of the World" has been my favorite.

  • The Upper Hand

  • By: Johnny Shaw
  • Narrated by: Alexander Cendese
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

Fifteen years ago, Axel, Gretchen, and Kurt Ucker lost their father. At the same time, they learned that he had secretly been a thief their whole lives - and left a fortune unaccounted for. Since then, the Uckers have lived a precarious existence. Their small town shunned and shamed them. Their mother, Bertha, retreated into her religion and her favorite televangelist, Brother Tobin Floom. Axel got a dead-end job. Gretchen turned to petty crime. And Kurt stayed with his mom and his garage band.  

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Adolescent Age

  • By Tim on 09-18-18

Adolescent Age

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-18

Johnny Shaw is the most underrated author that I always recommend to my friends, but yet, the book club that I belong to, refuses to read any of his stuff. Shaw's writing isn't for everyone. It is almost like a summer read for anyone who have a high level of testosterone rather than estrogen. I read for his jokes, outrages adventures and quick character development. I always have fun reading any of his books.

As for his new one, "The Upper Hand", it wasn't as funny as his previous books and a bit of a let down with limited swearing, but I still got a chuckle here and there. All of his books take me back to my adolescent age. Just funny with no responsibilities.

  • Vox

  • By: Christina Dalcher
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 449
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 417

On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than 100 words daily, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial - this can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women can no longer hold jobs. Girls are no longer taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke 16,000 words a day, but now women only have 100 to make themselves heard. But this is not the end. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Handmaid wanna be

  • By Bethany on 08-24-18

Took a U Turn

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

I almost didn't buy "Vox" because there are too many comparison of The Handmaid's Tale. Please stop comparing the two. It's really a turn off for anyone that is thinking about reading this book.

As for "Vox", I really like the concept of this book, but it became a different story for the second half. Somewhere between the spoken words, it took a u turn where the book became a science experiment for chimpanzees. What happened to the original premises of women has no rights at all and only allowed to speak 100 words a day?

  • American Kingpin

  • The Epic Hunt for the Criminal Mastermind Behind the Silk Road
  • By: Nick Bilton
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 9,906
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,133
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 9,105

In 2011, a 26-year-old libertarian programmer named Ross Ulbricht launched the ultimate free market: the Silk Road, a clandestine website hosted on the Dark Web where anyone could trade anything - drugs, hacking software, forged passports, counterfeit cash, poisons - free of the government's watchful eye. It wasn't long before the media got wind of the new website where anyone - not just teenagers and weed dealers but terrorists and black hat hackers - could buy and sell contraband detection-free.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An honest portrait of DPR

  • By Victor on 05-18-17

Awesome

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-18

Awesome book at explaining the Silk Road and the Dark Web. This has to be one of my top five tech / crime books of all time. "American Kingpin" is a must read for anyone that is born in the cyber age. I got a little bummed out that the guy who created Silk Road had so much potential to do good, but ended up going to prison for selling drugs and people dying.