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Tim

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  • Bruce Lee

  • A Life
  • By: Matthew Polly
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Todd Ross
  • Length: 19 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 252
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 227
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228

The first authoritative biography of film legend Bruce Lee, who made martial arts a global phenomenon, bridged the divide between Eastern and Western cultures, and smashed long-held stereotypes of Asians and Asian Americans. Forty-five years after Bruce Lee’s sudden death at age 32, journalist and best-selling author Matthew Polly has written the definitive account of Lee’s life. It’s also one of the only accounts; incredibly, there has never been an authoritative biography of Lee.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic book about an amazing human

  • By David Quigley on 10-11-18

​Mythological Legend

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-18

​The life of Bruce Lee has always been an interest for me because his movies was apart of my childhood. I'd probably watched all of his movies at least twice. Bruce Lee is almost like a mythological legend in the Asian culture. He could be your long lost ninth cousin that you never knew and will never meet. Somehow we are all related to Bruce Lee because of our ethnicity at being Asian.

Matthew Polly's autobiography of "Bruce Lee" was honest for this man of steel. Polly doesn't sugar coat anything on this star, martial artist , womanizer and role model to many. The most interesting part was how he died. Upon his death, there were a lot of rumors going on and even after decades later, all of the rumors perceived to be true until the publishing of this book.

  • Twelve Years a Slave

  • By: Solomon Northup
  • Narrated by: Louis Gossett Jr.
  • Length: 7 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,996
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,746
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,745

In this riveting landmark autobiography, which reads like a novel, Academy Award and Emmy winner Louis Gossett, Jr., masterfully transports us to 1840s New York; Washington, D.C.; and Louisiana to experience the kidnapping and 12 years of bondage of Solomon Northup, a free man of color. Twelve Years a Slave, published in 1853, was an immediate bombshell in the national debate over slavery leading up to the Civil War.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Watched the Movie First, Then listened to the Book

  • By Russell on 02-04-14

​Terrible Times

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-08-18

When listening to "Twelve Years a Slave" you must pay attention to Louis Gossett Jr's voice because he almost gulps his words. I found him very distracting to listen to and lost my place many times in the story.

As for Solomon Northup's memoir, his life is an extraordinary story. Something that e should never forget or misplace in our history. 12 years of being in slavery and then escaping his freedom. What an amazing story of terrible times in our history.

  • A Place Called Freedom

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,893
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,269
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,248

This lush novel, set in 1766 England and America, evokes an era ripe with riot and revolution, from the teeming streets of London to the sprawling grounds of a Virginia plantation. Mack McAsh burns with the desire to escape his life of slavery in Scottish coal mines while Lizzie Hallim is desperate to shed a life of sheltered subjugation to her spineless husband. United in America, their only chance for freedom lies beyond the Western frontier - if they're brave enough to take it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WORTH THE CREDIT AND THEM SOME!

  • By Georgia on 08-28-15

Good Starter Kit

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-18

It's been a long time since I've read anything from Ken Follett. I've always enjoyed his writing style on historical fiction. Especially, his epic multi volume novels. They are some of the best that I've read. "A Place Called Freedom" is nowhere daunting as his popular series, but it's a good starter kit to get familiarize with his writing skills. Historical, slavery, hierarchy, and eroticism, these are all classic Follett. If you like this one, you will enjoy his much thicker multi series. They are bigger than a dictionary.

  • Black Hawk Down

  • By: Mark Bowden
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 15 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,208
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,026
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,027

Ninety-nine elite American soldiers are trapped in the middle of a hostile city. As night falls, they are surrounded by thousands of enemy gunmen. Their wounded are bleeding to death. Their ammunition and supplies are dwindling. This is the story of how they got there - and how they fought their way out. Black Hawk Down drops you into a crowded marketplace in the heart of Mogadishu, Somalia with the U.S. Special Forces and puts you in the middle of the most intense firelight American soldiers have fought since the Vietnam war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Classic Of Military Writing...

  • By Joshua on 11-06-16

​Classic for our Next Generation

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

​I don't usually read about modern warfare because I don't like knowing any about wars in my lifetime. They are all poorly written and pretty much all the same. Just lackluster brutal battles without any emotion, unlike both World Wars that capture the readers in so different ways.

"Black Hawk Down" was a bit different. Maybe because the movie is still my favorite, or maybe because it's been 25 years that the war has past, I found this book compelling to finish. Mark Bowden is an excellent writer. His book about Special Forces and Somalia could not be any more specific. All I needed was a flight jacket and choppers over my head to feel like I was there.

"Black Hawk Down" is going to be a classic for our next generation to respect our heroes from the past.

  • In Harm's Way

  • The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis and the Extraordinary Story of Its Survivors
  • By: Doug Stanton
  • Narrated by: Mark Boyett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,984
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,795
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,783

On July 30, 1945, the USS Indianapolis was torpedoed in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine. An estimated 300 men were killed upon impact; close to 900 sailors were cast into the Pacific Ocean, where they remained undetected by the navy for nearly four days and nights. Battered by a savage sea, they struggled to stay alive, fighting off sharks, hypothermia, and dementia. By the time rescue arrived, all but 317 men had died. The captain's subsequent court-martial left many questions unanswered

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating

  • By Clarence Sparks on 10-22-16

​​Buying Many More Copies

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-18

​When I first read Zamperini's life story, I thought that was the best survivors story that I ever heard. I bought many copies of that book and gave them as gifts. After reading about the sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, I'm buying many more copies of "In Harm's Way" and passing them out to whoever that wants to read on something that they can't imagine. I never listened to anything more riveting than the survival of the crew of the Indianapolis.

In fact, the two books compliment each other on what went on during the same time of WWII. When I was reading this book by Doug Stanton, I could had stayed up all night, just reading. I'm buying lots of copies of this book because everyone should read of true heroes, but the sinking of the ship could had been avoided.

  • The Cooking Gene

  • A Journey Through African-American Culinary History in the Old South
  • By: Michael W. Twitty
  • Narrated by: Michael W. Twitty
  • Length: 15 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70

Southern food is integral to the American culinary tradition, yet the question of who "owns" it is one of the most provocative touchpoints in our ongoing struggles over race. In this unique memoir, culinary historian Michael W. Twitty takes listeners to the white-hot center of this fight, tracing the roots of his own family and the charged politics surrounding the origins of soul food, barbecue, and all Southern cuisine.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Important to listen to

  • By Anne on 07-01-18

​Finish Less than Two Days

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

​I finished "The Cooking Gene" in less than two days. It's not because I liked the book, but I didn't wanted to spend the next week of torture and be in agony. I respect other cultures and like all kinds of food and I believe food is a big part of any culture, but Michael W. Twitty is a horrible writer and more so a terrible reader. I was really looking forward to learning about the history of Southern cooking and heritage of African Americans, but as soon as I got through the first chapter, I knew my 15 hours and 20 minutes blister was going to burst if I didn't get through this book as quickly as I could.

Not only the information is so disjointed, where I just imagine that the concept of this book was written in scratch paper, but Michael Twitty should had never recorded his own audiobook. I understand that this was a personal story for him, but he has no vocal talents to read his own content.

The picture of a cast iron skillet on the cover is misleading. There was no mentioned why fried chicken and watermelon is so degrading to African Americans or any other stereotypical judgement to their ethnicity.​

  • The Handmaid's Tale

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Claire Danes
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,116
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,378
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,372

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, serving in the household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife. She may go out once a day to markets whose signs are now pictures because women are not allowed to read. She must pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, for in a time of declining birthrates her value lies in her fertility, and failure means exile to the dangerously polluted Colonies. Offred can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost even her own name....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Top Pick for 2012

  • By Em on 11-30-12

​​Way Better Than Hulu

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-18

​After watching the first season on Hulu, I wasn't too keen to continue on watching the show. The show did not make any sense to me and to be honest, I don't know why there is so much fan fair over "The Handmaid's Tale". I'm not really sure if I can watch season two, but I thought that I would try the book.

Before I started reading the book, I asked my book club if "The Handmaid's Tale" is worth a try. Many times, I disagree with the book club and most members doesn't agrees what I like to read either, but we have been friends for a long time and what's the point of joining a book club where we can't express our opinions. Many of the members said that this was a great read and I would probably like the book much better than the show.

My friends were right!

I couldn't put this book down. The book is way better than the show in every way. It was well written and I didn't felt lost, unlike the show. I found the book a lot more engaging than watching the series. The book is a little different then Hulu's adaptation, but it just shows you reading something is much different than watching.

Thanks Book Club for suggesting that I give "The Handmaid's Tale" a try. Some of my friends are telling me that I should watch season two also, but I think that I will pass. The book was very good and I don't want to give too much credit to my friends. It's always good to not to agree to know our reading habits.

  • The Letter of Marque

  • Aubrey/Maturin Series, Book 12
  • By: Patrick O'Brian
  • Narrated by: Patrick Tull
  • Length: 11 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 983
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 717
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 709

In The Letter of Marque, Jack is once again aboard his beloved Surprise but stripped of his post captaincy for a crime he did not commit. Bought by Stephen, the Surprise has become a privateer. Sailing into French waters, the two concoct a desperate mission which, if successful, may redeem Aubrey from his state of disgrace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Two Patricks

  • By Male Feminist on 02-12-04

​Still Listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-18

​I'm still listening to Aubrey–Maturin series. Actually, I just finished #12, "The Letter of Marque" and as usual, I gave it five stars. I'm really enjoying these books because a part of me has a hidden life that I'm not aware of, by having sea legs and wants to sail the ocean. Besides the super writing from the author, I'm more amaze at listening to the reader.

So far I've listened to 170 hours of Patrick Tull's performance. He has become that neighbor that sits on his porch and telling stories of his time in the Navy. I can't wait for his next visit.

  • Milk!

  • A 10,000-Year Food Fracas
  • By: Mark Kurlansky
  • Narrated by: Brian Sutherland
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 55

Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the best-selling Cod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic and culinary story of milk and all things dairy - with recipes throughout. According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Horrible narration nearly kills Kurlansky

  • By Scarlatti's Muse on 05-15-18

​Cold Frosted Glass

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

​I read this book by accident when I was poking around Goodreads to look up what to read next. By instinct, I gravitate toward to informational books then anything else. As soon as I looked at the cover of a bottle glass of milk, I knew that it was something that I want to read.

"Milk!" is one of the best informational book that I ever read. It's one thing to read for entertainment purposes, but it's a whole new ballpark, when you are learning also. I never thought that I would know so much about milk, dairy products and history. For example, I never knew that the elites would use the poor housewives to nurture their babies.

"Milk!" is my book of the year. I simply couldn't put this down. This was ridiculous good. After I finish a chapter, I wanted to go onto the next. As a milk drinker, I felt like that I just finished a cold frosted glass of milk. I​ was​ very satisfied with the last gulp.

  • Niceville

  • By: Carsten Stroud
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 105
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 97

A boy literally disappears from Main Street. A security camera captures the moment of his instant, inexplicable vanishing. An audacious bank robbery goes seriously wrong: four cops are gunned down; a TV news helicopter is shot and spins crazily out of the sky, triggering a disastrous cascade of events that ricochet across twenty different lives over the course of just thirty-six hours. Nick Kavanaugh, a cop with a dark side, investigates.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't get through it.

  • By Mark Pelham on 03-27-16

Not Sure and Probably Not

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

A friend of mine suggested that I should give "Niceville" a try because we are both super fans of Stephen King. Stephen King tweeted that he liked this book by Carsten Stroud. The book has all different stories of the people that lives in Niceville. It also has a supernatural theme to it. After researching more of this book, it's an ongoing trilogy. I'm not sure if I will continue on the series. Unless Audible has the next book on sale, I will probably won't read the rest, but the first book was fun while it lasted.