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Martin

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  • Bomber Pilot: A Memoir of World War II

  • By: Philip Ardery
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 9 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 74
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72

"The sky was full of dying airplanes" as American Liberator bombers struggled to return to North Africa after their daring low-level raid on the oil refineries of Ploesti. They lost 446 airmen and 53 planes, but Philip Ardery's plane came home. This pilot was to take part in many more raids on Hitler's Europe, including air cover for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. This vivid firsthand account records one man's experience of World War II air warfare.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating...and true story

  • By Loretta on 06-24-15

Gripping story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. Gripping story, well written and well read.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The author...duh!

What about James Killavey’s performance did you like?

Very good narration ... let the author tell the story without trying to "take over."

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Both..in different sections.

Any additional comments?

This ranks right up there with my all time favorite WWII flying book..The Wrong Stuff.

61 of 62 people found this review helpful

  • Reconsidering the American Way of War

  • US Military Practice from the Revolution to Afghanistan
  • By: Antulio Joseph Echevarria
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72

This audiobook challenges several longstanding notions about the American way of war. It examines US military practice (strategic and operational) from the War of Independence to the campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan to determine what patterns, if any, existed in the way Americans have used military force. Echevarria surveys all major US wars and most every small conflict in the country's military history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent overview of complex subject

  • By Joe on 11-25-14

Must read for military.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-15

Would you consider the audio edition of Reconsidering the American Way of War to be better than the print version?

Much easier to understand. I had to read this for a class on military history and found it rough going. It's very dense and the sentence structure seems awkward at times...at least for me. I found listening to it a little at a time - 30 minutes or so, to be much easier since the reader did much of the work of "pharsing" the text and it actually became pretty clear what the author was talking about.

What other book might you compare Reconsidering the American Way of War to and why?

The Art of War but, of course, much more modern.

What does James Killavey bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Already said it...did a great job of making a complex book easier to understand.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Not really.

Any additional comments?

Thank you, Audible. One of the side benefits of listening is that, during class discussions, I was one of the few who pronounced the many difficult names correctly. The professor was very impressed and my classmates a bit envious. I wish all my required readings were in Audiobook form.

47 of 48 people found this review helpful

  • 200,000 Miles aboard the Destroyer Cotten

  • By: C. Snelling Robinson
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 14 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 559
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 521
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 516

In mid-1943, Snelling Robinson joined the crew of the Fletcher class destroyer USS Cotten as a newly commissioned ensign. The Cotten sailed to Pearl Harbor in time to join the Fifth Fleet. Under the command of Admiral Raymond Spruance, the Fifth Fleet participated in the invasions of Tarawa and Iwo Jima and several naval battles in the Philippine Sea and the Leyte Gulf.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding Book and Recording. Five Stars.

  • By Martin on 12-27-14

Outstanding Book and Recording. Five Stars.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-14

Would you listen to 200,000 Miles aboard the Destroyer Cotten again? Why?

Already read the print version once. Now listening to the audio book. The first person narration makes it an even more enjoyable experience and I can be doing other things at the same time.

What did you like best about this story?

The author served aboard the Destroyer USS Cotten in WW 2. (Ship named after a Navy Captain, not the plant ) The Cotten was a Fletcher-class destroyer, built in 1943. It’s purpose was to protect America’s new carriers from Japanese aircraft and submarines. This is a well written and fascinating story of his three years aboard the ship. Robinson and the Cotten survived some of the greatest and bloodiest naval battles in history -- the forcible amphibious assault landings at Tarawa, Saipan, and Iwo Jima, and the enormous fleet engagements in the Philippine Sea and Leyte Gulf. I've read quite a few such books but, in my opinion, this is the best of the lot, written by someone who was actually there. To quote another review of the printed version, “Few authentic veterans have ever done a better job portraying life at sea on a small man-of-war. His narrative is crisp, informative, authoritative.” I heartily agree. I think this book should become required reading for any future naval officer, if it isn't already.

Which scene was your favorite?

There were many of them. The scenes where they were trying to deal with the Kamikaze pilots were especially riveting.

Who was the most memorable character of 200,000 Miles aboard the Destroyer Cotten and why?

The author and, of course the Cotten.

Any additional comments?

I read the print version some time ago and am now in the middle of the audiobook. I am taking a brief pause to write this review. The narrator is doing an excellent job and, thank goodness, is familiar with Navy terminology. Little things like saying “zero-eight hundred” for the time, instead of the Army way of “Oh-eight hundred hours.” Things like this and the correct pronunciation of the many areas the ship visits, is making it obvious the publisher and the narrator took the time to make an excellent print book into an equally excellent audio book. Highly recommended.

122 of 124 people found this review helpful