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Sheepish Reader 'n' Writer

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  • How the Light Gets In

  • A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel, Book 9
  • By: Louise Penny
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 15 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,381
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,095
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,094

Shadows are falling on the usually festive Christmas season for Chief Inspector Armand Gamache. When Gamache receives a message from Myrna Landers that a longtime friend has failed to arrive for Christmas in the village of Three Pines, he welcomes the chance to get away from the city. Gamache soon discovers the missing woman was once one of the most famous people not just in North America, but in the world, and now goes unrecognized by virtually everyone. As events come to a head, Gamache is drawn ever deeper into the world of Three Pines.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Welcome Home!

  • By Nancy J on 09-06-13

Great Marriage of Text and Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-13

The Gamache series is one of my favorites. These books are some of the best written I've run across. They are obviously written for the more intelligent reader, but they aren't condescending - there is something here for everyone and Book 9 is no exception. I started out reading this series, but then got tuned into Ralph Cosham's narration and haven't turned back. There's a wonderful marriage here with his reading and Penny's text. I hope this isn't the end of the series. I think I saw a crack of light leaving a chance of more.

  • The Great Gatsby

  • By: F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Narrated by: Jake Gyllenhaal
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,365
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,290
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,297

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic American novel of the Roaring Twenties is beloved by generations of readers and stands as his crowning work. This new audio edition, authorized by the Fitzgerald estate, is narrated by Oscar-nominated actor Jake Gyllenhaal ( Brokeback Mountain). Gyllenhaal's performance is a faithful delivery in the voice of Nick Carraway, the Midwesterner turned New York bond salesman, who rents a small house next door to the mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simple, Beautiful, and Exquisitely Textured

  • By Darwin8u on 04-09-13

My New Favorite Version of The Great Gatsby!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-13

The Great Gatsby has always been one of my favorite stories and the performance by Jake Gyllenhaal blew me away - this version is my new favorite. I already thought the story was outstanding, but the performance is as well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Inventor and the Tycoon

  • A Gilded Age Murder and the Birth of Moving Pictures
  • By: Edward Ball
  • Narrated by: John H. Mayer
  • Length: 15 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 55

One hundred and thirty years ago Eadweard Muybridge invented stop-motion photography, anticipating and making possible motion pictures. He was the first to capture time and play it back for an audience, giving birth to visual media and screen entertainments of all kinds. Yet the artist and inventor Muybridge was also a murderer who killed coolly and meticulously, and his trial is one of the early instances of a media sensation.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • a challenge to listen to

  • By Andy on 07-14-13

A Bit Slow

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-13

Would you listen to The Inventor and the Tycoon again? Why?

This is one of the few books I've listened to that I wouldn't repeat. In fact, my iPod turned on in my bag and I missed a bit. I didn't go back. I expected the pace to be equivalent to Muybridge's motion studies and Stanford's horses. Unfortunately, for me, the text plodded. The book was interesting though.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful